National Jazz Museum in Harlem August Schedule

The August 2009 public programs of the National Jazz Museum in Harlem present a diverse selection of events. For instance, trumpeter Wynton Marsalis’s compositional range and depth will be the focal point of a four-part series on Tuesdays. From his writings for small and large ensembles, to his forays into long-form and chamber composition, this free program will provide depths of musical analysis of Marsalis’s compositions unavailable even in most university settings.
 
One Saturday per month we delve deeply into a jazz topic of interest, often of musical artists of yesteryear deserving more attention. This month the pioneering drummer Papa Jo Jones is the focus of the Saturday panel, and will contain the viewpoints of senior statesmen of the music, as well as scholar Paul Devlin, who has spent many years working on a Jones biography.
 
On two Wednesdays this month we will pursue the current relevance of jazz culture via a forward-looking panel discussion and live performance moderated by one of the most exciting young pianists to hit
the scene in decades, Jonathan Batiste. This new program will accentuate the perspective of emerging jazz artists on the present and future valence of jazz music in modern society and culture.
 
Batiste will also lead a trio at
the Rubin Museum of Art, where the music will speak for itself.
 
Another angle into the genius of Duke Ellington will be explored as we investigate his efforts with the written word. Our flagship series, Harlem Speaks, now in its fifth year, has two musicians of appeal across generations and style.
 
The first, pianist Vijay Iyer, is a polymath with musical talent who has garnered winning attention from jazz critics far and wide for his compositional daring and integration of elements ranging from Indian music to free jazz. The second, bassist Eddie Gomez, has been a standard-bearer in countless rhythm sections of note since the ’60s. Both combine intellect and soulfulness in their musical and verbal conversations. Don’t miss this rare opportunity to spend time with them as they stretch out.

Monday, August 3, 2009

 
Jazz for Curious Readers

Ellington: The Author
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Tonight's program focuses on Duke Ellington’s written words.

Duke Ellington is best known as a composer, band leader and pianist. His musical oeuvre is second to none among American composers. Much less known is his writings, which include occasional responses to critics and his only book-length work, Music is My Mistress. Join us for this in-depth exploration of his original writings.
 
Tuesday, August 4, 2009

Jazz for Curious Listeners

Wynton Marsalis: Small Groups
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300
                                                                    
Wynton Marsalis: The Composer
 
Wynton Marsalis is the Artistic Director of Jazz at Lincoln Center. Born in New Orleans, Louisiana in 1961, Mr. Marsalis began his classical training on trumpet at age 12 and soon began playing in local bands of diverse genres. He entered The Juilliard School at age 17 and soon joined Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers. Mr. Marsalis made his recording debut as a leader in 1982, and since he has recorded more than 40 jazz and 11 classical recordings, which have garnered him nine GRAMMY Awards. In 1983, he became the first and only artist to win both classical and jazz GRAMMYs in the same year; Mr. Marsalis repeated this feat in 1984.

Mr. Marsalis’s rich body of compositions includes Sweet Release, Jazz: Six Syncopated Movements, Jump Start, Citi Movement/Griot New York, At the Octoroon Balls, In This House, On This Morning, and Big Train. In 1997, Mr. Marsalis became the first jazz artist to be awarded the prestigious Pulitzer Prize in music, for his oratorio Blood on the Fields, which was commissioned by Jazz at Lincoln Center. In 1999, he released eight new recordings in his unprecedented “Swinging into the 21st” series, and premiered several new compositions, including the ballet Them Twos, for a June 1999 collaboration with the New York City Ballet. That same year he premiered the monumental work All Rise, commissioned and performed by the New York Philharmonic along with the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra and the Morgan State University Choir in December 1999. Sony Classical released All Rise on CD October 1, 2002. Recorded on September 14 and 15, 2001 in Los Angeles in those tense days following 9/11, All Rise features the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra along with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the Morgan State University Choir, the Paul Smith Singers and the Northridge Singers.
 
Tuesday, August 11, 2009

Jazz for Curious Listeners

Wynton Marsalis: Big Band
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Wynton Marsalis: The Composer

 
On March 6, 2007 he released From the Plantation to the Penitentiary on Blue Note Records, the follow-up CD to his Blue Note Records releases The Magic Hour and Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise and Fall of Jack Johnson, the companion soundtrack recording to Ken Burns’ PBS documentary of the great African-American boxer, and Wynton Marsalis: Live at The House Of Tribes.

Mr. Marsalis is also an internationally respected teacher and spokesman for music education, and has received honorary doctorates from dozens of universities and colleges throughout the U.S. He conducts educational programs for students of all ages, and hosts the popular Jazz for Young People concerts and the Essentially Ellington High School Jazz Band Program produced by Jazz at Lincoln Center. Mr. Marsalis has also been featured in the video series Marsalis on Music and the radio series Making the Music.  

He has also written four books: Sweet Swing Blues on the Road in collaboration with photographer Frank Stewart, Jazz in the Bittersweet Blues of Life with Carl Vigeland, Marsalis on Music which was the companion book for the PBS television series of the same name, and recently released To a Young Musician: Letters from the Road with Selwyn Seyfu Hinds, published by Random House in 2004. He was also one of three contributing authors to a children's book called Listen to the Storyteller and, in October 2005, Candlewick Press released Marsalis’s Jazz ABZ, an A to Z collection of 26 poems celebrating jazz greats, illustrated by poster artist Paul Rogers.
 
Wednesday, August 12, 2009

Jazz Is: Now!

Jazz Culture I
Host: Jonathan Batiste
7:00pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

NEW PROGRAM

Join pianist/composer/bandleader/phenom Jonathan Batiste with an open panel discussion on jazz culture and its relevance in today's society, with special musical guest performances.
 
Thursday, August 13, 2009

Harlem Speaks

Vijay Iyer, Pianist
6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Voted the #1 Rising Star Jazz Artist and #1 Rising Star Composer in the Downbeat Magazine International Critics' Poll for both 2006 and 2007, VIJAY IYER was described in The Village Voice as "the most commanding pianist and composer to emerge in recent years." The son of Indian immigrants, he is a largely self-taught creative musician grounded in the American jazz lexicon and drawing from a range of Western and non-Western traditions. His widely acclaimed recordings include Panoptic Modes (2001), Blood Sutra (2003), Reimagining (2005), and Tragicomic (2008) with his trio/quartet; Your Life Flashes (2002), Simulated Progress (2005), and Door (2008) with the experimental three-piece unit Fieldwork; Raw Materials (2006) in his longstanding duo with saxophonist Rudresh Mahanthappa and In What Language? (2004) and Still Life with Commentator (2007), his large-scale works in collaboration with poet-performer Mike Ladd.
 
As a composer/performer, Iyer has received commissioning grants from the Rockefeller Foundation MAP Fund (2000, 2001, 2005), the New York State Council on the Arts (2002), Creative Capital Foundation (2002), Mary Flagler Cary Charitable Trust (2002, 2004), American Composers Forum (2005), Chamber Music America (2005), and Meet The Composer (2006). He received the prestigious 2003 CalArts Alpert Award in the Arts, the 2004 Up & Coming Musician of the Year Award in the Eighth Annual Jazz Awards, a 2006 Fellowship in Music Composition from New York Foundation for the Arts, and a 2007 Artist Residency at Harvestworks.
 
Iyer's first orchestral work, Interventions, was commissioned and premiered by the American Composers Orchestra in March 2007 under the baton of Dennis Russell Davies for the ensemble's 30th anniversary gala concerts. It was praised by Anthony Tommasini in The New York Times as "all spiky and sonorous," and David Patrick Stearns of the Philadelphia Inquirer wrote that the piece "immediately proclaimed its importance." Peter Burwasser wrote in the Philadelphia City Paper, "[Iyer] brings it off with a heft and dramatic vision and a daring sense of soundscape."
 
Iyer has collaborated in performance and on disc with a wide range of contemporary artists, including Steve Coleman, Roscoe Mitchell, Amiri Baraka, Wadada Leo Smith, Dead Prez, Amina Claudine Myers, Butch Morris, George Lewis, Miya Masaoka, Trichy Sankaran, Samir Chatterjee, Pamela Z, Imani Uzuri, Will Power, Suphala, Dafnis Prieto, Burnt Sugar, Karsh Kale, Ibrahim Quraishi, DJ Spooky, John Zorn, and many others.
 
A polymath whose work has spanned the sciences, arts, and humanities, Iyer holds a B.S. in Mathematics and Physics from Yale College, and a Masters in Physics and an interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Technology and the Arts from the University of California at Berkeley. He was chosen as one of nine "Revolutionary Minds" in the science magazine Seed, and his research in music cognition has been featured on the radio programs This Week in Science and Studio 360. He has given master classes and lectures in composition, improvisation, cognitive science, jazz studies, and performance studies at New York University, The New School University, California Institute of the Arts, Columbia University, Harvard University, Manhattan School of Music, and the School for Improvisational Music, among others. His writings appear in Music Perception, Current Musicology, Journal of Consciousness Studies, Critical Studies in Improvisation, Journal of the Society for American Music, and the edited anthologies Uptown Conversation: The New Jazz Studies (Columbia Univ. Press) and Sound Unbound (MIT Press). He is a Steinway artist.
 
Tuesday, August 18, 2009


Jazz for Curious Listeners

Wynton Marsalis: Orchestral
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Wynton Marsalis: The Composer

 
In 2001, Mr. Marsalis was appointed Messenger of Peace by Mr. Kofi Annan, Secretary-General of the United Nations, and he has also been designated cultural ambassador, in conjunction with Jazz at Lincoln Center touring, to the United States of America by the U.S. State Department through their CultureConnect program. Mr. Marsalis was instrumental in the Higher Ground Hurricane Relief concert, produced by Jazz at Lincoln Center, which has raised over $3 million for the Higher Ground Relief Fund to benefit the musicians, music industry related enterprises and other individuals and entities from the areas in Greater New Orleans who were impacted by Hurricane Katrina. He helped lead the effort to construct Jazz at Lincoln Center’s new home – Frederick P. Rose Hall – the first education, performance, and broadcast facility devoted to jazz, which opened in October 2004.

Wednesday, August 19, 2009

Jazz Culture II
Host: Jonathan Batiste
7:00pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

NEW PROGRAM

Join pianist/composer/bandleader/phenom Jonathan Batiste with an open panel discussion on jazz culture and its relevance in today's society, with special musical guest performances.
 
Tuesday, August 25, 2009

Jazz for Curious Listeners

Wynton Marsalis: Chamber
Instructor: Ethan Iverson
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Wynton Marsalis: The Composer

 
Small ensemble jazz is comparable to chamber classical music in the intimate settings in which they are often performed and the conversational nature of the interaction among the musicians. Wynton Marsalis has innovated a unique compositional style for small jazz ensembles that makes for an intriguing study of comparison to his writings for the classical chamber ensemble. Join Ethan Iverson of The Bad Plus fame for an in-depth look and listen to some challenging and innovative music.

Thursday, August 27, 2009

Harlem Speaks

Eddie Gomez, Bassist
6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Eddie Gomez (born October 4, 1944) is a jazz bassist born in Santurce, Puerto Rico; he emigrated with his family at a young age to the United States and grew up in New York. He started on double bass in the New York City school system at the age of eleven and at age thirteen went to the New York City High School of Music and Art. He went on to study with Fred Zimmerman. He played in the Marshall Brown-led Newport Festival Youth Band from 1959 to 1961, and was later educated at Juilliard.
 
His impressive resumé includes performances with jazz giants such as Miles Davis, Dizzy Gillespie, Bill Evans, Gerry Mulligan, Benny Goodman, Buck Clayton, Marian McPartland, Paul Bley, Wayne Shorter, Jeremy Steig, Herbie Hancock, Tony Williams, Chick Corea and Carli Muñoz. Time Magazine lauded: “Eddie Gómez has the world on his strings”. Eddie Gómez would spend a total of eleven years with Bill Evans Trio which included performances throughout the United States, Europe, and the Orient, as well as dozens of recordings. Two of the Trio's recordings won Grammy awards. In addition, he was a member of the Manhattan Jazz Quintet.
 
Simply put, Gomez is one of jazz’s great veterans and this is a rare opportunity to hear him speak at length about his long and distinguished career.
 
In addition to working as a studio musician for many famous jazz musicians, he has recorded as a leader for Columbia Records, Projazz and Stretch. Most of his recent recordings as a leader, are co-led by jazz pianist Mark Kramer.

 
Friday, August 28, 2009

Harlem in the Himalayas

Jazz Festival: Jonathan Batiste Trio
7:00pm
Location: Rubin Museum of Art
(150 West 17th Street)
$18 in advance | $20 at door |
Box Office: 212-620-5000 ext. 344

Musicians you SHOULD know about!


Jonathan Batiste was born in New Orleans, Louisiana in 1986. He was first introduced to music through his family's band, the batiste Brothers Band, in which he played the percussions at the age of 8, switching to the piano at age 11. A student of jazz and classical music, Jonathan has been mentored by his musical family and other great musicians and is a poised and talented pianist of his generation. "An extremely rare talent. His feeling, originality, humor, boldness of conception and deep swing are an absolute joy" says pianist Benny Green.
 
By the age of 16 years old, Jonathan had, and can be seen, performing with some of New Orleans' most outstanding and respected musicians including the New Orleans Jazz Orchestra, Irvin Mayfield, Nicholas Payton, Alvin Batiste, Cyril Neville, Donald Harrison, Greg Tardy, Maurice Brown, Russell Batiste, Big Sam's Funky Nation, Troy "Trombone Shorty" Andrews and other great musicians. He has been performing at the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival for years and in 2005 headlined his show in the WWOZ Jazz Tent. He can be seen performing around the city at venues such as New Orleans' Snug Harbor, Tipitinas, Funky Butt as well as other venues and festivals worldwide.
 
His skills range from gifted performer and recording artist to composer and arranger as well. At the age of 17, Jonathan wrote the score for the Arts Council of New Orleans. His score will be played every day and all day as background music at the Louisiana Arts Work Museum in New Orleans.
 
The year of 2004, Jonathan graduated from St. Augustine High School and the New Orleans Center for Creative Arts (NOCCA). NOCCA is a high-level fine arts conservatory that has produced alumni such as Wynton Marsalis, Branford Marsalis, Harry Connick Jr., Terrence Blanchard and many more. He studied Jazz at NOCCA in which he received education in ear training, big band, combo playing and private lessons in which he studied with Michael Pellera, a prominent pianist/composer and educator. He also studied with Alvin Batiste, New Orleans clarinetist/composer who is head of the jazz studies department at NOCCA. Jonathan received a letter from the State of Louisiana Governor Office acknowledgement of outstanding NOCCA student. Jonathan was selected to the National Beta Club at St. Augustine High School, which is the academic high school he attended.
 
Upon graduating from high school he was the talk of many throughout New Orleans and even the country. Many people believe in the talent of this youth. "Full understanding of the harmonic approach to the piano. His solos, almost Monk-like, are inventive and unpredictable" says the great Benny Golson. The next move was New York City.
 
Jonathan auditioned at The Juilliard School for the 2004-2005 school year and was accepted. He is presently studying Jazz Piano at The Juilliard School of music in New York. Since his arrival to New York he has already began to make his mark on the music scene, from performing regularly around the city with his groups and others to debuting at Carnegie Hall in November of 2005.

Jonathan is already considered to be one of the of the next generation of young lions who will carry on the legacy of New Orleans' composers/piano wizards such as Jelly Roll Morton, Professor Longhair, and James Booker to New Orleans and the world over. He is establishing his own unique voice in the epically diverse world that we call music.
 
Saturday, August 29, 2009

Saturday Panels

Jo Jones
10:00am – 4:00pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

The Man Who Played Like The Wind

Paul Devlin, a literary scholar with a strong basis in jazz, has been working with Albert Murray on a biography of Jo Jones for many years. He will be sharing many of his insights, along with musicians who have found much to study, revere, and love about the music of this percussionist pioneer.
                           
Jo Jones shifted the timekeeping role of the drums from the bass drum to the hi-hat cymbal, greatly influencing all swing and bop drummers.  Buddy Rich and Louie Bellson were just two who learned from his light but forceful playing, as Jones swung the Count Basie Orchestra with just the right accents and sounds. After growing up in Alabama, Jones worked as a drummer and tap-dancer with carnival shows. He joined Walter Page's Blue Devils in Oklahoma City in the late '20s. After a period with Lloyd Hunter's band in Nebraska, Jones moved to Kansas City in 1933, joining Count Basie's band the following year. He went with Basie to New York in 1936 and with Count, Freddie Green and Walter Page he formed one of the great rhythm sections. Max Roach said on many occasions that if a drummer played three beats, he owed two of them to Jones.
 
Jones was with the Basie band (other than 1944-46 when he was in the military) until 1948 and in later years he participated in many reunions with Basie alumni. He was on some Jazz at the Philharmonic tours and recorded in the 1950s with Illinois Jacquet, Billie Holiday, Teddy Wilson, Lester Young, Art Tatum and Duke Ellington among others; Jones appeared at the 1957 Newport Jazz Festival with both Basie and the Coleman Hawkins-Roy Eldridge Sextet. Jo Jones led sessions for Vanguard (1955 and 1959) and Everest (1959-60), a date for Jazz Odyssey on which he reminisced and played drum solos (1970) and mid-'70s sessions for Pablo and Denon. In later years he was known as "Papa" Jo Jones and thought of as a wise if brutally frank elder statesman. This is a wonderful chance to focus in on one of the greatest jazz innovators and philosophers.

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