Folk

Kristy Lee Signs with ASCAP

Before her packed show at The Basement this past Monday, Alabama Firecracker Kristy Lee stopped by ASCAP Nashville's office to become a member of the performing rights organization and perform for the creative staff.
Kristy Lee is also currently slated to perform at this year's Hang Out Music Festival’s Main Stage & VIP pre-party in Gulf Shores, AL, producing and performing at UNLEASHED Memorial Weekend 2011 in Pensacola, FL, and sweep away passengers with her soul-folk sound on the Rombello Cruise this fall.
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TOUR DATES:
5/14 8pm Soul Kitchen Music Hall - Mobile, AL
5/20 4:45pm The Hangout Music Festival - Gulf Shores, AL
5/26-5/29 Memorial Weekend Unleashed 2011 - Pensacola, FL
9/29-10/3 Rombello Cruise - Tampa to Cozumel
* Tour Dates Added Regularly.
Please check www.kristyleemusic.com for more information.

Lissie Named VH1's Next "You Oughta Know" Artist

Lissie has been named VH1's next "You Oughta Know" artist, joining the ranks of the highly acclaimed franchise that has helped break many artists such as Adele, Sara Bareilles, Feist, Mumford & Sons, and Regina Spektor, among others. Lissie's VH1 "You Oughta Know" support includes music videos on VH1 and streamed music videos, interview clips, tour updates, photos and more at YouOughtaKnow.VH1.com beginning on May 2nd. On-air support on VH1 begins May 9th. Launched in 2004, the "You Oughta Know" program introduces promising new artists on the rise to VH1's base of music lovers.  Other current artists in the program include The Civil Wars, Fitz and The Tantrums, Grace Potter and The Nocturnals, Christina Perri, and Two Door Cinema Club.

On Saturday May 21st, following her current three-week Australian tour, Lissie will perform a benefit concert at the ALS Association Greater Chicago Chapter Walk in Wheaton, IL. Each year, the Walk to Defeat ALSTM brings communities together in the fight against Lou Gehrig's Disease, to which Lissie lost her aunt this past fall. Registration begins in Cantigny Park at 9am; the Walk begins at 11am and Lissie will perform immediately following the Walk. To register online, donate, or for more information on the ALS Association Greater Chicago Chapter Walk, please visit http://web.alsa.org/goto/lissie.

Later this summer, Lissie will perform at the Lollapalooza festival in Chicago, IL, the weekend of August 5th-7th. She'll also perform at the Cities97 Basilica Block Party in Minneapolis, MN, on July 8th, as well as at multiple European festivals in June and July - including the Isle of Wight Festival and Rockness 2011 in the UK. Lissie's US headlining tour in January and February featured multiple sold-out shows and drew glowing live reviews: SPIN.com declared of her Los Angeles show at The Music Box, "The way the sandy blonde stunner would count her players off in a whisper, the way she'd quietly coax each song out of its corner then build to a roar...one couldn't help but be a little in love for an hour at least."

Lissie's debut full-length album Catching A Tiger, released in the US August 17th, 2010 via Fat Possum, was primarily recorded in Nashville, TN, with Jacquire King (Kings of Leon, Norah Jones, Modest Mouse) and in Asheville, NC, with Bill Reynolds (of Band Of Horses, who also produced most of her 2009 EP, Why You Runnin'). The album - a captivating mix of classic '60s-flavored pop, spirited folk, and brilliant pop/rock anchored by Lissie's remarkably soulful, powerful voice - has garnered significant attention from the press, including The A.V. Club, Billboard, Blurt, The Boston Globe, Filter, The Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, Paste ('Best New Solo Artist of 2010'), Relix, SPIN, and USA Today. Her cover of Kid Cudi's "Pursuit Of Happiness" is featured as one of '50 Songs Every Man Should Be Listening To' in the music issue of Esquire on stands now.

Lissie appeared on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon in early February, performing "When I'm Alone," iTunes UK's '2010 Song Of The Year.' Last Call With Carson Daly has aired live performances of "In Sleep" and "Little Lovin'," taped at her October sold-out show at Los Angeles' The Troubadour, in October 2010 and March 2011, respectively.

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Lissie tour dates:

APRIL 27 HOBART, AU WREST POINT SHOWROOM*

APRIL 28 MELBOURNE, AU ORMOND HALL*

APRIL 29 MELBOURNE, AU THE FORUM*

MAY 3 BRISBANE, AU OLD MUSEUM*

MAY 4 BRISBANE, AU THE TIVOLI*

MAY 5 SYDNEY, AU THE METRO*

MAY 6 SYDNEY, AU THE METRO*

MAY 10 ADELAIDE, AU THE GOVERNOR HINDMARSH*

MAY 11 ADELAIDE, AU THE GOVERNOR HINDMARSH*

MAY 13 PERTH, AU THE ASTOR*

MAY 14 PERTH, AU FLY BY NIGHT

MAY 16 BRISBANE, AU THE ZOO

MAY 17 SYDNEY, AU OXFORD ART FACTORY

MAY 19 MELBOURNE, AU NORTHCOTE SOCIAL CLUB

MAY 21 WHEATON, IL LS Asso. Greater Chicago Chapter Walk

(Cantigny Park)

MAY 28 TORONTO, ON PHOENIX CONCERT THEATRE

MAY 31 MONTREAL, QC THEATRE CORONA

JUNE 3 NURBURGRING, DE ROCK AM RING (Nurburgring Race Track)

JUNE 5 NURENBERG, DE ROCK IM PARK (Frankenstadion)

JUNE 8 CRANS-PRES-CELIGNY, CH CARIBANA FESTIVAL

JUNE 10 ISLE OF WIGHT, UK ISLE OF WIGHT FESTIVAL

JUNE 12 DORES, UK ROCKNESS 2011

JUNE 29 LANGESUND, NO WRIGHTSGARDEEN

JULY 1 WERCHTER, BE ROCK WERCHTER FESTIVAL

JULY 2 ST. GALLEN, CH OPENAIR ST. GALLEN

JULY 3 GUERNSEY, UK GUERNSEY FESTIVAL

JULY 8 MINNEAPOLIS, MN CITIES 7 BASILICA BLOCK PARTY

(Sun Country Stage)

AUG. 5-7 CHICAGO, IL LOLLAPALOOZA

* supporting Washington

David Bromberg's USE ME Tapes Friends

When David Bromberg, one of America’s finest roots musicians, emerged from a recording hiatus of 17 years with the solo, acoustic, traditional folk-blues album Try Me One More Time (Appleseed, 2007), fans and critics were thrilled, and the CD was rewarded with a Grammy nomination. For his follow-up album, Use Me, Bromberg chose a different approach: Why not ask some of his favorite singer-songwriters and musicians to write (or choose), produce, and perform on songs tailored to his versatile but distinctive skills as a guitarist and vocalist?

Answering David’s call were well-known artists from the many genres comprising the amorphous “Americana” musical category. Representing contemporary rootsy singer-songwriters: John Hiatt, the first musician Bromberg approached, who penned the pensive “Ride On Out a Ways” for him; for New Orleans “fonk,” Dr. John; there’s three-guitar jam band interplay with Widespread Panic and jug band music with Levon Helm (the sprightly “Bring It With You When You Come,” produced by Grammy-winning Larry Campbell). Linda Ronstadt puts in a rare appearance on a soulful Brook Benton ballad, Los Lobos contribute a Mexican-flavored waltz, Vince Gill and Tim O’Brien take care of the country and bluegrass quotient, Keb’ Mo’ brings the blues, and the hitmaking Butcher Brothers, producers Phil and Joe Nicolo (Bob Dylan, John Lennon, Cypress Hill, Nine Inch Nails), provide the languid R&B groove for the title song, a cover of Bill Withers’ classic “Use Me.”

The resultant album is due for July 12, 2011 release on Appleseed Records. A national tour will ensue.
Standout tracks change with each listening, but some of the high points include the crisp blues shuffle “Tongue,” the album’s lone Bromberg original, with Levon Helm on drums; “You Don’t Wanna Make Me Mad,” featuring David on slide guitar and Dr. John on piano; the ominous slow blues “Diggin’ in the Deep Blue Sea,” updated by Keb’ Mo’ and Gary Nicholson from Larry Davis’ “Texas Flood” to address the dangers of offshore drilling, and the chipper Vince Gill — Guy Clark co-write “Lookout Mountain Girl,” the only song on which David cedes most of the lead guitar duties (to Vince, although David splits the lead with Widespread Panic’s Jimmy Herring on “Old Neighborhood”).
Rather than collating individual instrumental parts literally phoned in to a central location, the recording sessions for Use Me generally took place on each guest artist’s home turf — in Woodstock (Levon Helm), New Orleans (Dr. John), Nashville (John Hiatt, Tim O’Brien, Vince Gill), Los Angeles (Los Lobos), and so on, to retain their regional flavors. For Bromberg, who started his professional career as an accompanist for everyone from Dion and Jay and the Americans to Bob Dylan and Willie Nelson, the sessions were simultaneously a throwback to his sideman days and a sidestep from his own recordings. “As artist and producer, I get to completely mold my vision of how the song should go,” he explains. “The drawback is that I don’t get many ideas that are not my own. It was fascinating for me to see the different approaches that everyone used in production.”
No matter who the producers, songwriters or accompanying musicians are on Use Me, Bromberg’s expressive guitar-playing and “rippling Fred Neil-like baritone that . . . brings warm, reassuring comfort” (Rolling Stone) remain the centerpiece of the CD, diamonds in golden settings.
Born in Philadelphia in 1945 and raised in Tarrytown, NY, “I listened to rock ’n’ roll and whatever else was on the radio,” says Bromberg. “I discovered Pete Seeger and The Weavers and, through them, Reverend Gary Davis. I then discovered Big Bill Broonzy, who led me to Muddy Waters and the Chicago blues. This was more or less the same time I discovered Flatt and Scruggs, which led to Bill Monroe and Doc Watson.”
Bromberg began studying guitar when he was 13 and eventually enrolled in Columbia University as a musicology major. The call of the Greenwich Village folk scene in the mid-’60s drew David to the downtown clubs and coffeehouses, where he could watch and learn from the best performers, including primary sources such as his inspiration and teacher, the Reverend Gary Davis.
Bromberg’s sensitive, blues-based approach to guitar-playing earned him jobs playing the Village “basket houses” for tips, the occasional paying gig, and lots of employment as a backing musician for Tom Paxton, Jerry Jeff Walker and Rosalie Sorrels, among others. He became a first-call, “hired gun” guitarist for recording sessions, playing on hundreds of records by artists including Bob Dylan (New Morning, Self Portrait, Dylan), Link Wray, The Eagles, Ringo Starr, Willie Nelson and Carly Simon. In the early ’90s, David produced an as-yet-unreleased Dylan album, although two tracks have been issued as part of Dylan’s “Bootleg Series.”
An unexpected and wildly successful solo spot at the 1970 Isle of Wight Festival in Great Britain led to a solo deal with Columbia Records, for whom David recorded four albums. His eponymous 1971 debut included the mock-anguished “Suffer To Sing the Blues,” a Bromberg original that became an FM radio staple, and “The Holdup,” a songwriting collaboration with former Beatle George Harrison on which Harrison also played slide guitar. David, who had met the Grateful Dead’s Jerry Garcia at the Woodstock Festival when they both took refuge from the rain in a tepee, wound up with four Dead members, including Garcia, playing on his next two albums.
Bromberg’s range of material, based in the folk and blues idioms, continually expanded with each new album to encompass bluegrass, ragtime, country and ethnic music, and his touring band grew apace. By the mid-’70s, the David Bromberg Big Band included horn-players, a fiddler, and several multi-instrumentalists, including David himself. Among the best-known Bromberg Band graduates: mandolinist Andy Statman, later a major figure in the Klezmer music movement in America, and fiddler Jay Ungar (who wrote the memorable “Ashokan Farewell” for Ken Burns’ PBS documentary, “The Civil War”).
Despite jubilant, loose-limbed concerts and a string of acclaimed albums on the Fantasy label, Bromberg found himself exhausted by the logistics of the music business. “I decided to change the direction of my life,” he explains. So David dissolved his band in 1980, and he and his artist/musician wife, Nancy Josephson, moved from Northern California to Chicago, where David attended the Kenneth Warren School of Violin Making. Though he still toured periodically, the recordings slowed to a trickle and then stopped.
After “too many Chicago winters,” in 2002 David and Nancy moved to Wilmington, Del., where they currently serve as unofficial “artists in residence” and where David established David Bromberg Fine Violins, a retail store and repair shop for high quality instruments. Frequent participation in the city’s weekly jam sessions helped rekindle Bromberg’s desire to perform music “live” again, and the encouragement of fellow musicians Chris Hillman (The Byrds, Desert Rose Band, Flying Burrito Brothers) and bluegrass wizard Herb Pedersen helped nudge him back into the recording studio. The Wilmington jams also led to the formation of Angel Band, fronted by Nancy and two other female vocalists, with David frequently serving as an accompanist.
Bromberg’s participation in his local and musical community has subsequently included a fund-raising music festival (Bromberg’s Big Noise in the Neighborhood) to help renovate a local theater, and a keynote address at this past spring’s Folk Alliance International convention, a non-profit organization of musicians, concert presenters and industry professionals.
David continues his musical revitalization with projects like Use Me, playing solo shows or backed by his own bluegrass quartet and reunions of the David Bromberg Big Band. Use your ears and catch him when you can!

Arlo Guthrie & Reed Foehl @ Boulder Theater

On April 20, eTown welcomes legendary artist Arlo Guthrie and up-and-coming Colorado musician Reed Foehl for a two-hour live taping. Folk music icon Arlo Guthrie will make his fifth visit to eTown, on the heels of his Journey On tour. And, Colorado-based singer/songwriter Reed Foehl, a storyteller in his own right, will perform material from his most recent release: "Once an Ocean."

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More Info / Buy Tickets

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Check out some earlier Arlo coverage on The Grateful Web.

MilkDrive Releases Studio Album ROAD FROM HOME

MilkDrive, Austin’s phenomenal alt-folk-progressive acoustic string band, will release on April 5 its debut studio album, ROAD FROM HOME, which captures the quartet’s soulful, textural, multi-layer mix of rhythms, tempos, flavors, improvisation and its harmony vocals.

After its Austin CD Release Show, on Friday, April 8, at Saxon Pub, MilkDrive plays a number of nationally acclaimed music festivals: Old Settler’s on April 14, “Woodsongs Old-Time Radio Hour” on May 9, Pagosa Folk N’ Bluegrass in Colorado in June, and Rockygrass in Lyons, Colo., at the end of July.
ROAD FROM HOME was recorded at Mountainside Audio Labs in Nashville, produced by MilkDrive and Bil VornDick (Alison Krauss, Bela Fleck), and engineered and mixed by VornDick.
Like its independently released debut live album, the band’s new studio album features fingers flying at “unbelievable” speed, original tunes that go beyond extraordinary and “impeccable” arrangements. Both “Back” and “Dry Creek Inn” from ROAD FROM HOME have the old-school sound, with haunting mandolin and fiddle, but thoroughly modern lyrics on topics such as love and death bring it into the 21st century.

Timber Timbre Unveils Video & Tour Dates

With the band’s richly textured and evocative fourth album, Creep On Creepin’ On, slated for release on Arts & Crafts April 5, Timber Timbre is pleased to announce a number of North American dates, intended to showcase what NPR has already hailed as “a haunted, gnarled switch of plaintive top tap” first hand for fans across the continent.

The band also recently commissioned a video for album track “Woman,” which features actor/musician Slim Twig and is premiering today on popmatters.com.

WATCH TIMBER TIMBER’S “WOMAN” VIDEO NOW

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TIMBER TIMBRE ON TOUR:

April 2 - Peterborough, ON @ Murray Street Baptist Church

April 7 - Hamilton, ON @ Centenary United Church

April 8 - Toronto, ON @ Trinity St. Paul's United Church

April 9 - Ottawa, ON @ First Baptist Church

April 11 - Boston, MA @ Brighton Music Hall

April 12 - Philadelphia, PA @ World Cafe Live

April 13 - New York, NY @ Joe's Pub

April 14 - Brooklyn, NY @ Galsslands

April 16 - Montreal, QC @ Corona Theatre

May 19 - Pontiac, MI @ Pike Room

May 20 - Chicago, IL @ Schubas

May 21 - Evanston, IL @ Space

May 22 - Mikwaukee, WI @ Cactus Club

May 24 - Minneapolis, MN @ Bryant Lake Bowl

May 26 - Winnipeg, MB @ Park Theatre

May 27 - Saskatoon, SK @ Amigo's

May 28 - Calgary, AB @ Central United Church

May 29 - Edmonton, AB @ Avenue Theatre

May 31 - Victoria, BC @ Alix Goolden Hall

June 1 - Vancouver, BC @ The Vogue Theatre

June 3 - Dawson, YT @ Dawson City Music Festival

June 5 - Whitehorse, YT @ Yukon Arts Centre

Christopher Paul Stelling Reveals NYC Residency

Christopher Paul Stelling arrived in New York City in 2008 with nothing but his guitar and a duffel bag. Not necessarily concerned with making a name for himself, circumstance and necessity soon found him singing and playing guitar on the subway platforms. Although he still turns heads while playing in the subway every now and then, Stelling has since graced some of New York’s finest stages, and now we’re thrilled to announce his Rockwood Music Hall residency April, taking place each Tuesday night at 8pm.

CPS also took time to link up with Break Thru Radio to film a compelling video for “Flawless Executioner,” which was recorded in a horse stable near Prospect Park in Brookyln. The video went live today, so head over to BTR and check it out!

The years prior to Stelling’s arrival in Brooklyn had seen him through something of an odyssey. He’s studied under a master guitar builder in Colorado, slept in a closet in North Carolina, managed a used bookstore in Florida, and wandered aimlessly through Seattle, all without a said plan in mind- and completely unaware that something was being stitched together beneath it all.

His guitar playing style would seem more appropriate for a man twice his age, bringing to mind the likes of Leo Kottke, John Fahey, and Sandy Bull. His songwriting reaches deep, tugging emotional heartstrings, all while conjuring up imagery from religion, mythology and folklore.  Having already self-released a 20 song album on his own, and a live session with Daytrotter, his first official full-length is currently in the works.

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Upcoming Christopher Paul Stelling Tour Dates

3/10 – NEW YORK, NY – The General Society of Mechanics & Tradesmen
(Live Performance & Artist Q&A)
4/05 - NEW YORK, NY - Rockwood Music Hall, Stage 1 
4/12 - NEW YORK, NY - Rockwood Music Hall, Stage 1
4/19 - NEW YORK, NY - Rockwood Music Hall, Stage 1
4/23 – BUTLER, PA – Butler Art Center (AABC)
4/26 - NEW YORK, NY - Rockwood Music Hall, Stage 1

Iron & Wine @ the Boulder Theater | 06.04.11

97.3 KBCO & Z2 Entertainment are proud to present Iron & Wine at the Boulder Theater on Saturday, June 4th, 2011.

Over the course of his ten-year career, Iron & Wine’s Sam Beam has become one of today’s greatest story tellers, crafting meticulous tales full of forlorn love, religious imagery and wistful dreams.  It’s been more than three years since his last studio effort, The Shepherd’s Dog, which was widely praised by fans and critics alike. While Beam’s early albums were sparse, intimate solo affairs, Shepherd’s introduced layered textures and poly-rhythmic sounds that allowed his lyrics to spring to life. It’s only natural then, that Beam took this sonic collage and built upon it for his new album, Kiss Each Other Clean. The result is a brighter, more focused record that retains the idiosyncratic elements that make Iron & Wine such an engaging band.

Beam continued to mine folk, African, rock, country, and Jamaican musical traditions, but switched the focus of his studio lens to 60s and 70s pop influences for the Kiss Each Other Clean sessions. Mingling memories of his parents’ record collection and hits heard between the static of scanning the car radio on family drives for inspiration, Iron & Wine is once again pushed into new territory. Multi-part vocal arrangements reminiscent of Buckingham / Nicks era Fleetwood Mac albums and classic Motown singles permeate “Half Moon” and “Godless Brother.” Electronic synthesizer sounds percolate through “Monkeys Uptown” and “Glad Man Singing” recalling the adventures of Elton John and Stevie Wonder. The horn sections on “Big Burned Hand” and “Lazarus” match the confidence of Beam’s vocal delivery and bring an entirely new dimension to Iron & Wine. Kiss Each Other Clean’s dynamics and surprises are the latest chapter in Beam’s studio collaborations.

Producer Brian Deck returned for the Kiss Each Other Clean sessions, continuing the creative partnership that he and Beam have developed over the course of three albums. The comfort level and respect found between Deck and Beam allows for a unique working relationship where they push each other to experiment, while still letting the songs naturally evolve in the studio. The Shepherd’s touring rhythm section Matt Lux, Ben Massarella (Califone), and Chad Taylor (Chicago Underground Duo) arrived early for live recording of basic tracks at Chicago’s Engine Studios and overdubs continued for about a year. Joe Adamik (Califone), Jim Becker (Califone), Thomas Bartlett (Doveman), Stuart Bogie (Antibalas), Rob Burger and Sarah Simpson round out the other musicians brought into the sessions to complement and fully realize the songs on Kiss Each Other Clean.

Kiss Each Other Clean’s profound artistic statement continues to move the listener’s expectation forward with regard to what one can expect from Iron & Wine. Beam’s masterful storytelling and musical experimentation relies on the conflict from combining the happy and the sad, the heavy and the light, and creating an ongoing narrative between the artist and the listener. It’s the blending of all of these elements that allows Kiss Each Other Clean the versatility to paint a true portrait of life.

Kiss Each Other Clean was recently released on January 25th, 2011 on Warner Bros. Records.

For more information, visit www.ironandwine.com

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Tickets are on sale at Boulder Theater Box Office. Call (303) 786-7030 for tickets by phone.

Tickets are also available through our website @ www.bouldertheater.com.

Tickets are On Sale Friday March 4th!

$32.50 adv / $35.00 dos

John Prine at the Boulder Theater - 03.25.11

97.3 KBCO & the Daily Camera are proud to present John Prine at the Boulder Theater on Friday, March 25th, 2011.

The first time he got onstage to perform – at a Chicago open mic night – there was absolute silence. Here comes a guy nobody had ever seen, a mailman from nearby Maywood, and the very first songs he ever sings are miracles, songs like “Hello In There” and “Angel from Montgomery.” But this stunned silence spelled disaster to Prine. “They just sat there,” he said. “They didn’t even applaud, they just looked at me. I thought, `Uh oh. This is pretty bad.’ I started shuffling my feet and looking around. And then they started applauding and it was a really great feeling. It was like I found out all of a sudden that I could communicate deep feelings and emotions. And to find that out all at once was amazing.”

That one night changed his life. The club-owner offered him a gig, and from that moment on he quickly became one of Chicago’s most beloved local heroes, a guy who would honor the Windy City with as much love and grace as Studs Terkel and Carl Sandburg. Prine soon befriended another local hero, Steve Goodman, and with Goodman he met the world. Kris Kristofferson heard his songs, helped him land a record deal, and soon everyone knew what Chicago already did, that Prine was the real deal. From that first album on, he came known as a genuine “songwriter’s songwriter,” one of the rare ones who writes the songs other songwriters would sell their souls for.  Evidence of this is the long list of songwriters who have recorded his songs, including Johnny Cash, Bonnie Raitt, the Everly Brothers, John Denver, Kris Kristofferson, Carly Simon, Ben Harper, Joan Baez, and many others. Even Bob Dylan was stunned. “His stuff is pure Proustian existentialism,” said Bob Dylan.  . “He’s so good,” said Kristofferson, “we’re gonna have to break his fingers.”

Dylan and the rest were simply recognizing that which we have all come to know, that Prine’s songs are so hauntingly evocative of the laughter and tears inherent in the human condition, so purely precise and finely etched, that lines from them linger in our hearts and minds like dreams, separate from the songs. There’s the rodeo poster from “Angel from Montgomery,” the hole in daddy’s arm and the broken radio (from “Sam Stone”), the old trees that just grow stronger (from “Hello In There.”) The kinds of lines you carry around in your pocket, knowing they’re in there when you need them. With a staggering penchant for detail, a proclivity to be both hilarious and deeply serious (and often in the same song), and a visceral embrace  of roots music, he’s  made the kinds of songs nobody ever dreamed of before, or since.

Born on October 10th, 1946 in Maywood, he grew up spinning Roy Acuff and Hank Williams 78s in his dad’s collection, as well as tuning into WJJD to hear Webb Pierce, Lefty Frizell and others “back to back, all night long.” And then a new kind of music arrived: “I was coming of age just as rock and roll was invented,” he said, and along with his country heroes he added Elvis, Little Richard, Fats Domino, and the one he loved the most, Chuck Berry: “Because he told a story in less than three minutes.”

At 14 he started playing guitar and never stopped, starting with old folk tunes taught to him by his brother Dave. After high school he enlisted in the army, and was happy to be stationed in Germany, far from Viet Nam. He spent most of his time in the barracks playing guitar and singing Lefty Frizzell and Hank Williams songs with a friend.After the army, he became a mailman, which he loved because he could write songs while walking his familiar route. “It was like a library with no books,” he said.

He haunted the fringes of Chicago open mic nights, mostly at the old Fifth Peg on Armitage in Old Town. Once he summoned up the courage to perform, although terrified, he knew he was home. The rest is singer-songwriter history. It was 1971, the dream of the Sixties was over and Goodman and Prine emerged with a new kind of song, eschewing abstractions to write story songs about real people:  “Midwestern mindtrips to the nth degree,” as Dylan put it. Songs with the concrete details and imagery of a novel, but compounded, like Prine’s hero Chuck Berry’s songs, into mini-masterpieces.

After landing his first gig, he went home and wrote more masterpieces that made up his first self-titled debut, released in 1971. It was received with near-unanimous raves: “… absolutely one of the greatest albums ever made,” wrote a hometown paper, “by one of the most creative and evocative songwriters of our time.” There was the recognition then, which has been confirmed by the passage of time, that even among the best, he stood out. “Good songwriters are on the rise,” wrote Rolling Stone, “but John is differently good.”

Fans hungry for meaningful new music discovered him, unconcerned if he was the “new Dylan” or not, as he was often labeled, but drawn to the complex simplicity of his songs, the heady amalgam of sorrow and whimsy. Always seeking to strike a balance in his work, Prine said he wrote funny songs so as to get back to the tragic ones.

He made eight albums on two major labels, including Sweet Revenge, Common Sense, and Bruised Orange. In 1980 he moved to Nashville, and with longtime manager Al Bunetta, formed his own label, Oh Boy Records in 1981. They’ve since released a chain of great records, including 1991’s Grammy-winning The Missing Years, which featured cameos by Bruce Springsteen and Tom Petty. In 2000 he recaptured his own legacy by recording Souvenirs, new recordings of many of his classic songs.

In 1998 he was diagnosed with a rare form of cancer centered in his neck. The removal of a tumor and subsequent radiation seems to have eradicated it completely. Although his singing voice was lowered significantly, he faced his illness with the same blend of wistful humor he instills in his songs. In a post-surgery letter to his fans, he wrote, “Hopefully my neck is looking forward to its job of holding my head up above my shoulders.”

Now he’s back with a brand new live album, John Prine: In Person & On Stage, which contains both solo and duet renditions of some of early songs such as “Angel From Montgomery” (here in a breathtaking duet with Emmylou Harris) as well as later classics such as “Unwed Fathers” (with Iris DeMent) and one of the most poignant songs ever from a husband to a wife, “She Is My Everything.”

“If he’s this good this young,” wrote Rolling Stone in 1971, “time should be on his side.” Truer words have rarely been written. Some four decades since his remarkable debut, Prine has stayed at the top of his game, both as a performer and songwriter. Recently honored at the Library of Congress, he has been elevated from the annals of songwriters into the realm of bonafide American treasures.  Poet Laureate Ted Kooser introduced him at the Library of Congress by likening him to Raymond Carver for making “monuments of ordinary lives.” But the greatest testaments to his lasting legacy are the songs themselves. Unlike so many which belong only to the time in which they emerged, his, like the old trees in “Hello In There,” seem to just grow stronger with the passing years.

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Tickets are on sale at Boulder Theater Box Office. Call (303) 786-7030 for tickets by phone.

Tickets are also available through our website @ www.bouldertheater.com.

Tickets are On Sale Saturday, February 5th!

$40 GA / $48.50 Res / $65 Gold Circle

Sugar Hill To Release Brian Wright's House On Fire

Sugar Hill Records is proud to continue its legacy of incredible songwriters with the release of Brian Wright’s House on Fire – due out March 29th. While this is the first label release from the Waco, TX native, he has built a firm base of fans within and beyond the music industry with two previous releases and tireless touring in the US and Europe. Unlike previous releases, which were both recorded in the studio with a band, House on Fire approaches the recording process in a much more relaxed and reflective manner, with Wright playing every instrument himself and handpicking his prolifically written songs into a mindful, well-curated collection.

And make no mistake, this album truly is about the songs. Gems like “Mean ol’ Wind” and “Live Again” convey the tenderness of the soul which very few songwriters can capture.  “Striking Matches” and “The Good Dr.” bring the driving sound of a cross-country bound train, bound for heartache or redemption. “Maria Sugarcane” paints with a Southern Gothic brush that would make Flannery O’Connor proud.

“When people ask what I sound like, I usually say I’m somewhere between Woody Guthrie and Velvet Underground,” says Wright. “This album finally allowed me to make the music the exact way it was in my head.”

After spending his early twenties on the Austin/Waco/Dallas bar circuit, playing everything from punk to covers, Wright flipped a coin to decide his future home, either New York City or Los Angeles.  Going West won the day.  Today, when not touring, he resides in Los Angeles where he is a fixture in the LA music scene.  For the last six years he has been the front man and lyricist for his band Brian Wright and the Waco Tragedies, a band that has gathered a devoted audience across the country.

Wright has plans to launch the record with a full showcase schedule at SXSW in Austin plus a string of nation-wide tour dates.