Site of the Month

Hippie Things (February 2001)

- for the Grateful Web
Call  Toll Free 1-866-243-8336
Tuesday-Saturday 11-6pm and Sunday 12-5pm Central standard time
Shop hours are different for each season
but you can still shop online 24/7 :)
Special offer FREE sticker with purchase of two posters,
 
Plus be sure to check out the  Stickers page, Click here 
Visa and Mastercard accepted
Paypal Available!
Secure shopping cart for your peace of mind.
Shipping until further notice is soley through UPS
 
 

LocksofLove (December 2002)

 

locksYou may not have ten inches of hair to donate, but there are plenty of other ways you can help!

Help Us Help Others!
Tell your pediatrician or dermatologist about Locks of Love. Or, if you know a child who needs our help, please contact us with the name and address of the family. We will send an application.

If you happen to live in the Palm Beach County area, we always need helping hands to open and sort mail, send thank you notes, and a hundred other tasks that keep us going! Call us at (561) 963-1677.

ArtiGras
Do you know a celebrity that would be willing to doodle for Locks of Love? Contact us today for more information.

Friends of Cheese (August 2000)

- for the Grateful Web

Who is The String Cheese Incident?

  • Michael Kang electric mandolin, acoustic mandolin, violin
  • Bill Nershi six string acoustic guitar
  • Keith Moseley five string electric bass, four string acoustic bass
  • Michael Travis drums, congas, djembe, talking drum, percussion
  • Kyle Hollingsworth piano, organ, Rhodes accordion

    Masters of improvisation, The String Cheese Incident has reached the cusp of an explosive national breakthrough through outstanding live performances and a dedication to touring. Now averaging over 160 shows a year, the band has attracted fans of all genres by mixing high energy fun with rigorous musicianship and impassioned artistry.

    The String Cheese Incident crafts undeniable masterpieces from an astonishing mix of roots musics, with intricate mountain bluegrass, transcendent Afro-pop rhythms, sensuous Latin melodies and breezy Calypso grooves that branch from a trunk of traditional American rock. The String Cheese Incident not only weaves together these incredibly diverse musical elements, it creates an entirely new sound in the process.

    This Boulder, Colorado based quintet has leapt into the collective conciousness of several grassroots scenes at once. Fans of bluegrass, reggae, jambands and other roots genres have strongly embraced the creative milestone that is SCI's music, as well as the band's ability to create a relaxed, fun environment at every show, or Incident, as they are better known.

    The symbiotic, audience-band relationship that develops into a rich atmosphere at each Incident lead the band to provide a new level of fun and music to their fans in 1998 through several international Incidents, in both Negril, Jamaica, and Akumal, Mexico. More international shows are currently being planned.

    Pioneers of both music and the business of music, The String Cheese Incident has steadfastly refused to compromise any amount of creative control over its music by signing with a major label. Applying the grassroots ethic that has made the band into successful touring artists,The String Cheese Incident instead chose to launch a full-scale label, Sci Fidelity Records. The band now continues to build its grassroots empire with a website that attracts one million hits a month, an in-house ticketing service and a travel agency designed to cater to their fans.

    While the band's Incidents have become the stuff of legend, it is in the studio that The String Cheese Incident distinguishes itself in craftsmanship. Buoyed by the 1998 release "Round The Wheel," which has become the band's best selling album to date with its mix of richly textured arrangements and tight, ear-catching pop tunes, Sci Fidelity Records and The String Cheese Incident are currently choosing tracks for a live double album that will be released in early fall.

    The String Cheese Incident received the honor of opening and closing the 1998-99 New Year's Eve Celebration at the Kaiser Auditorium in Oakland, CA, with remaining members of the Grateful Dead and Hot Tuna. The band's success on a massive U.S. tour in the spring of 1999 culminated in three sold-out shows at the legendary Fillmore Auditorium in San Francisco, and a string of sold out shows along the east coast.

    In June, The String Cheese Incident returns to the Telluride Bluegrass Festival as a headlining act, where they stole the show as the opening act in 1993, just six months after their official formation. This summer, the band will also headline both the High Sierra Music Festival and the Oregon Country Fair. Looking towards the millennium, The String Cheese Incident will host a two-night New Years extravaganza in Portland, OR that will encompass a "world-music" theme on a scale of grand proportions.

    The creative and musical foundation that constitutes the essence of The String Cheese Incident is always evolving with the band's musical tastes and their interaction with the fans in the live setting. The albums speak volumes and the critical acclaim rises, but there is no substitute for a live "Incident".

    - Image and text from The String Cheese Incident official website, www.stringcheeseincident.com

  • Central Plains Jamband Society (October 2002)

    plainsCentral Plains Jamband Society (CPJS) is a grassroots nonprofit organization that is committed to improving the live jamband music scene in the Midwest.  We are succeeding by educating a growing loyal fan base about jambands while giving those jambands exposure to their public.

    We believe that the best way to accomplish our goal is to create a social environment where the fans can interact with one another and become friends.  To this end, CPJS has online discussion groups, forums, and organizes music festivals, live concerts, CD trading parties and other fun social events.

    We encourage all of our members to support the jamband scene by regularly going out and enjoying live music.  CPJS periodically organizes member gatherings, fund raisers, and fun events to help strengthen the jamband community.  We hope to create a loyal membership within Central Plains Jamband Society that will help us spread the word to others about jamband music.  This is an organization that brings fans together with bands.

    Board of Directors

    Hello, my name is John Bollin, most people know me as Johnny B.  I grew up in Leavenworth, KS.  After high school I moved to Pittsburg, KS to go to school.   While there, a college roommate introduced me to the Grateful Dead.  I started going to Grateful Dead concerts in 1990 and was VERY drawn to the music and the scene.   From this scene I met people that introduced me to live tape trading, a bunch of new "jambands" that allowed taping, and the internet.  In 1994 I started taping shows.  I have been involved in the local and internet taping/jamband community since.   I enjoy being a part of the this community and want to do what I can to help make it flourish.

    Thanks for stopping by to read my bio, but more importantly thanks for showing interest in Central Plains Jamband Society!! I have a day job that allows me to pursue my after hour passions for live music.  I grew up moving every couple of years, and I believe this is one of the reasons for my continual involvement with Jamband music. I was brought up with change all the time, and I get a lot of that at live shows. I got involved with CJPS because I was interested in meeting the faces that I always saw at shows.  I have met so many new friends and my hope is that when I am 65 I am still involved with CJPS. Once again, thanks!! Michelle

    Hi.  My name is Todd Garren.  Many of you know me as "GoToddGo".  I was born in St. Louis, but grew up in Kansas City.  My interests include playing pool, guitar, nature and spreading music.  I have always listened to and enjoyed all types of music.  But when a friend of mine introduced me to Phish and to jamband music, I knew it was something special.  Ever since then, I have chosen to devote my time supporting the jamband scene.  I do this because the jamband "community" is wonderfully unique and makes me feel great.  I am a part of Central Plains Jamband Society because I want this feeling of "community" to grow.  Let's work together to make it happen!  Peace.  -GoToddGo

    Hello, thanks for your interest in the Central Plains Jamband Society.  Without you the fan, we wouldn't exist.  I am a Kansas City native and currently live in the Brookside area. From an early age I have loved all types of music, but life changed when I was introduced to jamband music.  My college roommate introduced me to the Grateful Dead, which opened up a whole new world of great music. In 1989, I started a weekly jamband radio show on my college radio station, KSDB 91.9.  I still have fond memories of a regular listener recommending an album by friends of his. I finally found the vinyl masterpiece and started playing the title track regularly on my show.  After a few weeks of play my listener called back with his friends on the telephone.  Who was it?  It was the then unknown band (in the Midwest) named Widespread Panic.  Since college, I have traveled all over the Unites States to see all kinds of great live music.  When the opportunity to start CPJS came up, I couldn't resist.  I've seen a lot of great changes in our music scene over the last ten years; the years to come will be even better!  I'm on the bus, who else is in?

    All my life I have been involved in music.  Growing up I was involved in my church's choir and participated in my school choir as well.  My family was very influenced by British musicians and I was the youngest so whatever they listened to so did I.  I grew up to the sounds of the Beatles, Rolling Stones and Led Zeppelin.  These bands were big favorites in my household.

    Over time I became more fascinated with more artist in the rock and roll scene as I grew up.  In high school my brother turned me on to American rock and roll by buying me my first Grateful Dead record "In the Dark" for my sixteenth birthday.  From that day on I became intrigued with the Grateful Dead and it's culture it stood for.  I listened to many of my brother's bootlegs and discovered the meaning of improvisational music.

    I attended college at Avila College in Kansas City, MO.  In October of 1995, I attended my first Phish concert at Municipal Auditorium in downtown Kansas City.  I was completely blown away for the first time hearing Mike's Song> I am Hydrogen>Weekapaug Groove and knew instantly that Phish had become my new favorite band.  I continued to attended as many shows as possible and fell in love with the whole theatrics of their show along with the audience and artist connection that Phish had established with its phans.

    On January 1st, 2000 in the early hours of the new century at Big Cypress Seminole Indian Reservation.  I met a taper whom I randomly stumbled upon.  We chatted briefly and came across that we both were from the Kansas City area.  Johnny Bollin became my first taper friend and introduced me to the jamband community in Kansas City.  It was a whole new world for me to be in.  I began to collect and trade shows with other people who enjoyed this type of music.  At Avila College I had two friends who were very familiar with Phish.  The rest of the student body could not identify with me on this level.

    As Johnny and I became friends so did I with his wife Michelle.  Since then we all have become friends through the music of Phish.  In the summer of 2001, Michelle came to me with the idea of Central Plains Jamband Society.  I was in total favor of it, and have helped support CPJS from it infancy.  I enjoy meeting new people from the area as well as all over the country.  The jamband community is my second family away from home.  The unity and energy that is involved with this music and its culture is where I have always felt comfortable being myself.

    I write for CPJS and interview artists in the local, regional, and national levels.  I love to recognize artists and tell their stories from when they were growing up.  I feel there is more to an artist than just the music they make.  I hope to see CPJS grow and become a successful organization that provides a safe haven for all types if people of different backgrounds.  Thank you for reading my bio and supporting CPJS and live music.

    Pink Floyd Online (February 2003)

    New Pink Floyd DVD and Book
    It has now been confirmed the release titled, "Inside Pink Floyd - A Critical Review 1967 - 1996", will be a 2 disc DVD set complete with accompanying book. It is scheduled for release June 14th, 2004 on the Classic Rock label as part of their "Critical Review" series...

     

     

    Pink Floyd song played on Mars
    The Pink Floyd song Eclipse, from the album Dark Side of the Moon was used to wake the Mars probe 'Opportunity' on the 10th of March 2004. The song was chosen in recognition of the transit of the martian moon, Phobos. After the probe finished with the classic song...

     

     

     

    Gilmour to Perform at Benefit Concert
    It was recently announced that David Gilmour will be one of the guest artists appearing as part of the week long series of Teenage Cancer Trust benefit shows in London. The shows, organist by the remaining members of The Who, will be held at the end of...

     

     

     

    Dark Side of the Moon wins 4 Awards
    The 2003 Surround Music Award winners were announced at a gala event in Los Angeles yesterday, (December 11th, 2003). The ceremony, organized by UE Media's Surround Professional magazine, recognized the year's outstanding achievements in the field of...

     

     

     

    Site: PFO and RWO join forces
    I'm pleased to announce Roger Waters Online and Pink Floyd Online have joined forces. Roger Waters Online is the premier site on the web for Roger Waters related news and info, and we are teaming up to bring a more complete service to Pink Floyd and...

     

     

     

    Pink Floyd Reunites? UPDATE
    It now appears that early reports that Roger Waters performed with Pink Floyd at Steve O' Rourkes funeraI were in fact false, despite this news coming from very reliable sources. Initial reports suggested that Roger Waters was present and reunited with Pink Floyd to play...

     

     

     

    'Dark Side' Nominated for Award
    Pink Floyd's 'Dark Side of the Moon' SACD is one of six discs nominated for High Fidelity Review's 2003 Surround Music People's Choice Award. Visitors to the High Fidelity Review site can vote for their favourite title of 2003, with the award being presented to the...

    Grateful Dread on the Web (January 2003)

    On Grace and RWR

     Are you sick of the seemingly nonstop coverage of "national mourning?" Yeah, me too. Thank the goddess for "Elimidate." Funeral? Procession? Watching the plane carrying his remains fly into DeeCee? No thanks, I pass.

    As previously stated, I am all for folks injecting truth about Ronald Reagan into the ongoing one-sided lovefest. An accurate portrayal of the man must include good and bad, and if there are those who see more bad than good, well, they have the right and duty to speak their truth.

    Into this arena comes commentator and cartoonist Ted Rall. I like much of Rall's work - his published opinions are sometimes incendiary (which is not necessarily a bad thing), and more often than not (such as in the case of his controversial and harsh May 3 take on the granting of "hero" status to football star-turned-friendly-fire-casualty Pat Tillman), he is dead right. Most of the positions in Rall's take on Mr. Iran-Contra are in line with mine. Check out this excerpt from his June 9 commentary, "Reagan's Shameful Legacy":

    Reagan's defenders, people who don't know the facts or choose to ignore them, claim that "everybody" admired Reagan's ebullient personality even if some disagreed with his politics. That, like the Gipper's tall tales about welfare queens and "homeless by choice" urban campers, is a lie. Millions of Americans cringed at Reagan's simplistic rhetoric, were terrified that his anti-Soviet "evil empire" posturing would provoke World War III, and thought that his appeal to selfishness and greed - a bastardized blend of Adam Smith and Ayn Rand - brought out the worst in us. We rolled our eyes when Reagan quipped "There you go again"; what the hell did that mean? Given that he made flying a living hell (by firing the air traffic controllers and regulating the airlines), I'm not the only one who refuses to call Washington National Airport by its new name. His clown-like dyed hair and rouged cheeks disgusted us. We hated him during the dark days he made so hideous, and, with all due respect, we hate him still.

     

    Rall had me until the last sentence. While I can't say I liked the man and I certainly didn't admire him or find inspiration or optimism in him, I emphatically do not hate Reagan. Then again, I don't hate any person. Rall, here, is expressing his emotions truthfully; he has that right. But it is important for folks on the Left to stand against hate in any form - trust me, the Right will hold all libs accountable for the publicly expressed hatred of a few, so we must speak against hate.

    Listen to O'Reilly, Limbaugh, Carlson, Coulter et al, if you can stomach them: They insist that the Left is all about hatred. Not so. Some so-called progressives indeed hate, but not all do. This lib may hate right-wing policies and actions (and some Democratic ones as well), but that doesn't mean personally hating the Shrub or Rummy or John Effin' Kerry or Ronnie Ray-gun.

    If you are opposed to hate, you should oppose it when it comes from the Right and the Left. After all, progressivism is supposed to be about peace and love - the antithesis of hate - isn't it?

    Rall defends his criticism of Reagan, and I do not disagree with him a bit on it. As he notes for Conspiracy Planet, "Imagine what would happen when Clinton dies, and they gloss over the fact that he lied under oath. I bet there will be conservative writers there to point that out and say something similar to what I said. And I think it is completely appropriate."

    Absolutely right, and not just because I am no fan of Slick Willie. I can deal with folks praising Reagan, but without telling the full story of the man and his deeds, it amounts to nothing more than inane sycophancy. We need the counterpoints.

    Still, there is a huge difference between pointing out a dead president's sins and envisioning him burning in Hell.

    In a June 6 rant on his blog, Rall really showed the lengths of his hatred:

    How Sad...

    ...that Ronald Reagan didn't die in prison, where he belonged for starting an illegal, laughably unjustifiable war against Grenada under false pretenses (the "besieged" medical students later said they were nothing of the sort) and funneling arms to hostages during Iran-Contra.

    Oh, and 9/11? That was his. Osama bin Laden and his fellow Afghan "freedom fighters" got their funding, and nasty weapons, from Reagan.

    A real piece of work, Reagan ruined the federal budget, trashed education, alienated our friends and allies and made us a laughing stock around the world.

    Hmmmm...sounds familiar.

    Anyway, I'm sure he's turning crispy brown right about now.

    Ouch.

    Again, I'm with him until the very last sentence. Perhaps a lot of libs are saying that sort of thing in private (I'm praying for them). And honesty is indeed the best policy. But speaking for myself, I believe the Creator is a merciful deity. Avoiding hell is based on favor and God's grace, not merit. (If not for this, I trust most of us would end up a crispy brown.) Meaning, if I have a shot of getting into heaven, so should Ronnie Ray-gun. And I have to wish for that, even as I criticize what the 40th president did throughout his hellish reign.

    So, please forgive me if I borrow a question from - of all people - El Rushbo: Where's the love, Ted?

    Fur is Dead (January 2004)

    The fur ads you might see in magazines and commercials portray fur coats as a symbol of elegance. But these ads fail to show how the original owners of these coats met their gruesome deaths.

     

    Millions of fur-bearing animals—including foxes, raccoons, minks, coyotes, bobcats, lynxes, opossums, nutria, beavers, muskrats, otters, and others—are killed each year on fur farms by anal and vaginal electrocution and in the wild by drowning, trapping, or beating.

    Click on the sections below to read more about each.

    A Lifetime in a Cage

    Fur Farm Exposé

    What We Uncovered on a "Modern" Fur Farm

    Foxes in Boxes

    Suffering in the Wild

    Fur mean, Not "Green"

    Fur: A Personal Choice?

    "Suffering in the Wild": The Fur Industry & Indigenous Trappers

    Free tags: 

    Enviornmental Protection Agency (December 2003)

     

    Our Mission

    Our Mission
    The mission of the Environmental Protection Agency is to protect human health and the environment. Since 1970, EPA has been working for a cleaner, healthier environment for the American people. View the Agency's complete strategic plan, annual report, and policy resources.

     

    Our Mission

    Our Mission
    The mission of the Environmental Protection Agency is to protect human health and the environment. Since 1970, EPA has been working for a cleaner, healthier environment for the American people. View the Agency's complete strategic plan, annual report, and policy resources.


    Who We Are
    EPA employs 18,000 people across the country, including our headquarters offices in Washington, DC, 10 regional offices, and more than a dozen labs. Our staff are highly educated and technically trained; more than half are engineers, scientists, and policy analysts. In addition, a large number of employees are legal, public affairs, financial, information management and computer specialists. EPA is led by the Administrator, who is appointed by the President of the United States.


    What We Do
    EPA leads the nation's environmental science, research, education and assessment efforts.

    Develop and enforce regulations: EPA works to develop and enforce regulations that implement environmental laws enacted by Congress. EPA is responsible for researching and setting national standards for a variety of environmental programs, and delegates to states and tribes the responsibility for issuing permits and for monitoring and enforcing compliance. Where national standards are not met, EPA can issue sanctions and take other steps to assist the states and tribes in reaching the desired levels of environmental quality. More information

    Offer financial assistance:  In recent years, between 40 and 50 percent of EPA's enacted budgets have provided direct support through grants to State environmental programs. EPA grants to States, non-profits and educational institutions support high-quality research that will improve the scientific basis for decisions on national environmental issues and help EPA achieve its goals.

    Perform environmental research: At laboratories located throughout the nation, the Agency works to assess environmental conditions and to identify, understand, and solve current and future environmental problems; integrate the work of scientific partners such as nations, private sector organizations, academia and other agencies; and provide leadership in addressing emerging environmental issues and in advancing the science and technology of risk assessment and risk management. More information

    Sponsor voluntary partnerships and programs: The Agency works through its headquarters and regional offices with over 10,000 industries, businesses, non-profit organizations, and state and local governments, on over 40 voluntary pollution prevention programs and energy conservation efforts. Partners set voluntary pollution-management goals; examples include conserving water and energy, minimizing greenhouse gases, slashing toxic emissions, re-using solid waste, controlling indoor air pollution, and getting a handle on pesticide risks. In return, EPA provides incentives like vital public recognition and access to emerging information. More information

    Further environmental education: EPA advances educational efforts to develop an environmentally conscious and responsible public, and to inspire personal responsibility in caring for the environment. More information


    How We Are Organized
    Explore the Agency organization chart and access information about specific program offices, regional offices, and labs across the country.


    Our Budget and Performance

    Access primary budget documents, information about performance measures, EPA's annual report, and various other management reports, including:


    Contracting Opportunities
    Access documents that describe the specifications and proposal due dates for supplies and services the government requires, information on contract awards, notifications of canceled procurements, and other information about contracting with EPA.


    Our History
    In July of 1970, the White House and Congress worked together to establish the EPA in response to the growing public demand for cleaner water, air and land. Prior to the establishment of the EPA, the federal government was not structured to make a coordinated attack on the pollutants that harm human health and degrade the environment. The EPA was assigned the daunting task of repairing the damage already done to the natural environment and to establish new criteria to guide Americans in making a cleaner environment a reality. More Information

    Howard Dean for America (November 2003)

    Democracy for America  is dedicated to supporting candidates for all levels of office and building a grassroots network.

    Our goals are:

    1. To have strong, sustained grassroots involvement in the democratic process.
    2. To promote an America where candidates and office holders tell the truth about policy choices and stand up for what they believe. The era when politicians equivocate about matters as fundamental as war and peace must end.
    3. To fight against the influence and agenda of the two pillars of George W. Bush's Washington: the far right-wing and their radical, divisive policies, and the selfish special interests who for too long have dominated politics.
    4. To fight for progressive policies like health care for all; investment in children; equal rights under law; fiscal responsibility; and a national security policy that makes America stronger by advancing progressive values.

    Over the next couple of months we will:

    1. Recruit and encourage progressive candidates to run for office at every level. We will help them find the resources to campaign successfully with small donations from grassroots supporters, to begin to break the stranglehold special interests have on the political process.
    2. Raise funds for Congressional candidates for whom financial support could be the key to winning, and whose election will be key to winning back a House of Representatives that has become the tool of the Republican right-wing.
    3. Develop strategic partnerships with other progressive organizations to maximize resources for candidate recruitment, training, and organization.
    4. Build relationships with other political initiatives to focus on the failed, destructive policies of the Bush administration.
    5. Harness the power of the Internet to enlarge and support our grassroots organization committed to taking back America from special interests that control the right wing leadership of our Congress and the White House.

    Read Governor Dean's full announcement speech.

    ENS - Environmental News Service (October 2003)

    The Environment News Service is the original daily international wire service of the environment. Established in 1990 by Editor-in-Chief Sunny Lewis and Managing Editor Jim Crabtree, it is independently owned and operated.

    The Environment News Service (ENS) exists to present late-breaking environmental news in a fair and balanced manner.

    ENS news reports are indexed by Reuters/Dow Jones Factiva, and the London Financial Times. Over 400 websites feature ENS headlines and story briefs.

    ENS contributors around the world cover issues and events that affect the environment such as: legislation, politics, conferences, lawsuits, international agreements, demonstrations, science and technology, public health, air quality, drinking water, oceans and marine life, land use, wildlife, forests, natural disasters, the indoor environment, hazardous materials, toxics, nuclear issues, renewable energy, recycling, transportation, and environmental economics.

    Respected, knowledgeable correspondents file stories to the central ENS editorial desk. In addition to being journalists, ENS contributors are often experts in other fields. They may be lawyers, economists, biologists or geographers. Most are based in centers such as Washington, London, Brussels, Moscow, Canberra, Buenos Aires, Tokyo, Kathmandu, or Cape Town. Some travel on assignment.

    ENS has been first with many stories over the years. An ENS correspondent was on the ground during the first days of the Gulf War and was first to report on the environmental consequences of that conflict. An ENS reporter was first into the Soviet secret nuclear site at Alma Ata. ENS correspondents have covered the ecological effects of conflicts in Croatia, Kosovo, Afghanistan, and Iraq.

    Many news sources in the United States and around the world contact our newsroom well in advance of public announcements and work closely with us on breaking developments.

    The Environment News Service maintains editorial offices in Washington, DC; Boulder, Colorado; and Seattle, Washington.

    Story inquiries for Environment News Service (ENS) may be directed to: news@ens-news.com.

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