august

Jazz Museum Events: August 26-29, 2008

Dr. Billy Taylor- for the Grateful Web

Tuesday, August 26, 2008

JAZZ FOR CURIOUS LISTENERS
7:00pm
A Celebration of Dr. Billy Taylor

Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | register online

Instructors: Loren Schoenberg & Christian McBride

This week come greet and meet Dr. Billy Taylor in person.

Last week instructor Greg Thomas continued the month-long tribute to Dr. Taylor with a focus on trio configurations throughout his career, from the 50s 'til this century. Tempos ballad to brisk, and styles from straight-ahead swing to spiritual solemnity to dance-groove funk to a classically-tinged composition featuring his trio with a symphony orchestra, were appreciated by the attendees at the National Jazz Museum in Harlem's Visitors Center.

Dr. Taylor is one of the few musicians extant tutored by Art Tatum, and who, as house pianist at Birdland, can recount his days playing and recording with Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Ben Webster, Coleman Hawkins and other standard bearers of jazz innovation. So expect the living jazz master to share wisdom in his inimitably warm style of conversation...with Loren Schoenberg and Christian McBride.

 

Thursday, August 28, 2008

Harlem Speaks
6:30 – 8:30pm                                            Eddie Bert Trombonist

Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE

Trombonist Eddie Bert's career spans nearly seven decades of jazz, from big bands to bebop and beyond. In addition to being a jazz musician who's played with one and all, he's been a regular in Broadway show bands, and a first call studio player. Yet no matter what the musical setting, Eddie has always played his uniquely personal, warm and melodic style of jazz.

When renowned jazz leaders needed a dependable, original trombonist for a significant recording or event in the second half of the twentieth century, they turned to Eddie Bert. In fact, his resume reads like a Who's Who of modern Jazz, including musical relationships with Thelonious Monk, Charles Mingus, Coleman Hawkins, Woody Herman, Stan Kenton, Machito, Tito Puente, Benny Goodman, Thad Jones and Mel Lewis.

There's a reason Eddie Bert has played with the jazz masters - he's a truly gifted musician, a trombonist who has easily traversed eras and genres, from bop to swing, Mingus to Hampton, and Kenton to Herman. Eddie straddled the racial divide as well. He played in one of the first integrated big bands, Charlie Barnet's 1943 aggregation, which included Howard McGhee, Buddy DeFranco and Oscar Pettiford.

In addition to being one of the most dependable players in jazz history, always in demand because of his sight-reading skills and his ability to lend a passionate and individual approach to all music, Eddie is a soloist and arranger with a distinctive musical voice. In 1955, when he stopped playing only to sleep, he won Metronome's Musician of the Year award. He followed that with a top rated album of the same name for Savoy. He has led a number of other recordings during his distinguished career, featuring such sidemen as Duke Jordan, Joe Morello, Hank Jones and Kenny Clarke.

Yet during Eddie's teenage years, 52nd Street was a hotbed of musical activity. At fifteen, he began frequenting "The Street," where musicians of all generations played and gathered nightly. Being too young to get into the clubs at night, Eddie hung around during the afternoon when he knew the bands would be rehearsing.

Fast-forwarding several decades, in the 1990s Eddie started working with drummer T.S. Monk's group. "We did a European tour in 1997 and an album that featured a lot of Thelonious' new material that T. S. had found around the house. He hired me because I had played with his father-if you hang around long enough, you find that you have played with everyone's father!"

Now in his eighth decade, Eddie Bert is still playing the trombone, still traveling, and still married to Mollie, his wife of 60+ years. With three daughters and four grandchildren, he enjoys spending time with his family and, when not playing, also likes photography.

Friday, August 29, 2008

Harlem in the Himalayas
7:00pm                                   Theo Croker Quartet featuring Marcus Belgrave

Location: Rubin Museum of Art
(150 West 17th Street)
$18 in advance | $20 at door |
Box Office: 212.620.5000 ext. 344
 
Marcus Belgrave, trumpet
Theo Croker, trumpet
Joe Sanders, bass
Sullivan Fortner, piano
Kassa Overall, drums
 
Trumpeter Theo Croker, Doc Cheatham's grandson, has been featured all summer at Harlem in the Himalayas. This last performance promises to be hot, with Croker locking horns in antagonistic cooperation with elder trumpet legend Marcus Belgrave.
 
Trumpeter, composer, arranger, educator, recording artist, and producer Marcus Belgrave was born in Chester, Pennsylvania June 12 1936.
 
He began playing the trumpet at age six and professionally at age twelve.  Mr. Belgrave describes himself as "born into bebop."  An early inspiration and mentor was Clifford Brown.  At age eighteen, Marcus earned his initial reputation joining the Ray Charles Orchestra.  His solo on Alexander's Ragtime Band from the album The Genius of Ray Charles put him on the map. He toured for five years and is heard on such Charles hits as  Night Time is the Right Time, What'd I Say, You are My Sunshine, Margie, Ruby and Stella by Starlight.
 
In the early 60's he worked and recorded in the bands of leading innovators of post-bop modern jazz: Max Roach, Charles Mingus and Eric Dolphy. In 1963 Marcus settled in Detroit, becoming one of the prominent studio musicians with Motown Records.  He is heard on many Motown hit recordings including Dancing in the Street, The Way You Do the Things You Do, and My Girl. His distinguished career as a player includes performances with legendary stars from both the pop music and jazz world: Ella Fitzgerald, Bud Powell, Tony Bennett, Aretha Franklin, Sammy Davis Jr., Wynton Marsalis, Lena Horn, Liza Minnelli, Doc Cheatham, Sarah Vaughn, Dizzy Gillespie, Billy Eckstein, Gene Krupa (with whom he recorded) and many others.
 
As an original member, starting in 1988, he toured with the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra, appearing on national television and recording for CBS/Sony. Marcus Belgrave's own recordings began in 1974 with the release of his self-produced album Gemini II, showcasing a collective of Detroit jazz artists, which he led. This record was the first to garner the attention of the international jazz press, about new "cutting edge" jazz activity emanating from that famous music city. Belgrave's recordings from the 1980's and '90's include the critically acclaimed Detroit Piano Legacy with Tommy Flanagan and Geri Allen and Working Together, Marcus' collaboration with composer/drummer Lawrence Williams. Recording more traditional jazz material in this period, Marcus co-led on albums with several of the last surviving "pioneers" of the pre-bebop era including saxophonist Franz Jackson (Live at Windsor Jazz Festival III) and pianist Art Hodes (Hot 'n Cool Blues). Critical accolades for these releases are cited in The Biographical Encyclopedia of Jazz, The Rolling Stone Guide to Jazz and Blues on CD, other jazz reference books, and major news publications.
 
Since 2001 Marcus Belgrave has led his Tribute to Louis Armstrong octet, appearing in thirty states, Canada and Puerto Rico and playing Armstrong's music in pops programs with the Detroit Symphony and other US orchestras.

As a soloist, Marcus continues to travel the US for appearances at jazz festivals, night clubs and concert hall performances. In January 2006 he was featured on three concerts at Jazz at Lincoln Center's presentation Detroit: Motor City Jazz, later broadcast on National Public Radio.

Mr. Belgrave is internationally known for his dedication to educational endeavors. He is founder of Detroit's Jazz Development Workshop and co-founder of the Jazz Studies Program at the Detroit Metro Arts Complex (recognized with grants from federal and state levels). He was also an original faculty member with the Oakland University Jazz Studies Program and in 2003 became the first Chair of Jazz Education and Programming for the Detroit Symphony Orchestra. Beneficiaries of his musical tutelage include leading names of today's jazz scene: pianist Geri Allen, bassist Robert Hurst, saxophonist Kenny Garrett, violinist Regina Carter and bassist Rodney Whitaker. The past five years Marcus has served as Professor of Jazz Trumpet at Oberlin University in Ohio.
 
In recognition of his outstanding artistry, vision, and life-long achievement in jazz education, Marcus Belgrave is the recipient of numerous honors including the Arts Midwest Jazz Master Award, the Michigan Governor's Arts Award, and the Louis Armstrong Award.

THE FABULOUS THUNDERBIRDS TO PLAY DENVER ON AUGUST 31

- for the Grateful Web

The Fabulous Thunderbirds will be playing Taste of Colorado at the Qwest Main Stage, in Civic Center Park, in downtown Denver on August 31 at 7:30 PM.  Admission is free for the entire Taste of Colorado event, which runs from August 29 through September 1.  For more information, please call 303-295-6330.

For over thirty years, The Fabulous Thunderbirds have been the quintessential American band. The group's distinctive and powerful sound, influenced by a diversity of musical styles, manifested itself into a unique musical hybrid via such barnburners as "Tuff Enuff" and "Wrap It Up."

Founding member Kim Wilson spearheads the group as it evolves into its newest incarnation. "We started as a straight blues band." vocalist and harmonica player Wilson says. "We now incorporate a mixture of a lot of different styles. We're an American music band and we're higher energy than ever before." The Fabulous Thunderbirds features Jay Moeller on drums, Johnny Moeller and Mike Keller on guitar, and Randy Bermudes on bass.

Wilson's musical talents have garnered him multiple Blues Awards and Grammy Nominations. The Blues Foundation 2008 blues Music Awards named Wilson   "Instrumentalist - Harmonica" category.  In 2006, he was named "Contemporary Blues Male Artist of the Year" in 2006, and "Lookin' for Trouble!" was named Blues Song of the Year in 2004. Wilson has contributed to the work of many other great artists such as the legendary Muddy Waters (who called him his "son"), contemporary artist Bonnie Raitt, guitar legends Stevie Ray Vaughn and brother Jimmy Vaughn, and Martin Scorsese's movie "The Blues". With his current movie project "Cadillac Records," Wilson continues to focus on the music he loves.

With over 20 albums recorded and millions sold, Kim Wilson and The Fabulous Thunderbirds tour the world performing their own unique style of music. Ranging from pop anthems like "Powerful Stuff" which was featured in the Tom Cruise movie "Cocktail," to the low down blues of "Chicago," this brand of honest music brings fans back time and again.

Having shared the stage with The Rolling Stones, Joe Cocker, Carlos Santana and blues legends BB King and Buddy Guy and countless others, The Fabulous Thunderbirds continue to tour Europe and the North America, bringing more great music to their fans worldwide.

Their new CD (tentative title "Pay Back Time") is to be released in mid-2008.

Old 97's Murry Hammond's first solo album due August 18

Murry Hammond- for the Grateful Web

On August 18, 2008, Old 97's bass player and co-frontman Murry Hammond will celebrate the national release of his first full-length album outside of the Old 97's.

For two months prior to this street date, the album – I Don't Know Where I'm Going But I'm On My Way – was made available exclusively at Old 97's shows and through special mail-order. Hammond wished to capitalize on fan anticipation of the album's release in order to raise funds for the non-profit organization Project Mercy. Project Mercy builds basic housing in the poorest sections around Tijuana, Mexico (similar in mission to Habitat for Humanity) using volunteer labor provided by area churches. A group of men and women from Hammond's home church in Burbank, Calif. (where he performs roots gospel music weekly when he's not traveling) have adopted the organization as a primary mission. Hammond was in a unique position to raise funds quickly, and in time to fund fall building before the 2008 winter sets in. The strategy has already paid off, for as of July 1st generous fans purchased enough CDs to pay for one house.  The album will always be made available at Old 97's shows, with 100% going to charitable groups such as Project Mercy.

Hammond has played many memorable solo shows over the years, but it was certain events in his life, including the death of both parents, leaving Texas to start a family in California, and a renewed spiritual sense, that inspired him to record I Don't Know Where I'm Going But I'm On My Way. Hammond has been given the credit — and to some, the blame — for the persistent roots influence found in the 97's songwriting and sound, and that sound is found here in its distilled form. "Both in my own contributions and in co-writing with Rhett [Miller], I've always tended to push the chug of train songs, the soul of old-time songs and spirituals, the high-lonesome wail of mountain music, and the pure tuneful fun of singing cowboy music."  Hammond's contributions have been some of the group's most engaging, including the lament "Valentine" and "Color of a Lonely Heart is Blue," and with Miller he co-wrote some of the group's best-known songs, among them "Timebomb," "Indefinitely" and "The New Kid."

Hammond completed I Don't Know Where I'm Going but I'm on My Way over the course of 2007 in San Diego, California with producer Mark Neill, with whom Hammond worked on the Old 97's 2004 release Drag It Up. The album uses all acoustic instruments (six- and twelve-string guitars, a harmonium pump-organ), cowboy poetry-style spoken word and instrumentals, and lots of "period" reverb to paint a psychological journey through a world of spiritual trouble and triumph, restlessness, hope, loss, longing, regret, and wonder. Train songs and spirituals abound as Hammond displays his love of all things Carter Family, Hank Williams and Johnny Cash, but with the twist of incorporating the moody approach of ambient artists such as Brian Eno. Like that of his heroes, the music has a minimalist heart, at once serene and severe.

Inspired by the grass-roots ethic of early punk record labels such as Dischord and Touch & Go, Hammond decided to operate DIY. He funded all facets of the CD from recording to manufacturing, and he distributes by dealing directly with independent music stores and mail-order houses. Although he also sells on Amazon.com, Hammond wants you to know, "I fill all my own orders personally. It gives me a chance to occasionally write something thoughtful or joke-y on the mailing box."

Hammond is also excited to have contributed a new track, "Bound for Canaan," to a compilation of Sacred Harp music (also known as "shaped note singing") that was produced by the filmmakers of Awake My Soul, a documentary film about the 200-year history of Sacred Harp worship singing in the U.S. The film was shown in 2007 and 2008 on 120 PBS stations, and was released this year on DVD.  The compilation also features Innocence Mission, John Paul Jones from Led Zeppelin, Jim Lauderdale, Carolina Chocolate Drops and Woven Hand (ex-16 Horsepower), among others. The Awake My Soul audio CD is due later this year. More information on Awake My Soul film and audio CD can be found here.

For the rest of 2008 Hammond will be performing solo dates between Old 97's touring, and has also begun work on a follow-up project with producer Mark Neill.

World Premiere of Dead Symphony, August 1st, in Baltimore

Dead Symphony- for the Grateful Web

The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra will delve into the psychedelic world of The Grateful Dead on what would have been Jerry Garcia's 66th birthday, Friday, August 1 at the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall with the world premiere performance of Lee Johnson's Dead Symphony No. 6. More than 10 years in the making, Dead Symphony No. 6 is the first orchestral tribute to The Grateful Dead ever composed. For this one-night-only performance, the lobby will transform into a counterculture museum featuring Grateful Dead memorabilia and other rock 'n' roll gems from the 1960s and 1970s. Rare Grateful Dead photographs by Baltimore native Amalie Rothschild—house photographer for the legendary concert hall Fillmore East in NYC - will also be auctioned online and in the lobby the night of the performance with all proceeds benefiting the BSO. See below for complete program information.

Known not only as counterculture icons, but also for their original musicianship, the group stands alone in its embrace of genres as diverse as gospel, funk, jazz, blues and psychedelic rock—complex musical forms which lend themselves to symphonic settings. With a following of "Deadheads" in the hundreds of thousands even today, the legendary music of The Grateful Dead lives on with countless cover bands and live recordings. The BSO is the first major orchestra to dedicate an entire concert to The Grateful Dead's legendary music. The BSO's premiere of Dead Symphony No. 6 will also celebrate the 66th birthday of Jerry Garcia, the late lead guitarist and iconic member of The Grateful Dead.

Dead Symphony No. 6—the No. 6 signifies that it is Johnson's Sixth Symphony—dedicates separate movements to Grateful Dead hits "Saint Stephen," "Here Comes Sunshine," "Mountains of the Moon," "Blues for Allah," "Sugar Magnolia," "To Lay Me Down," "If I Had the World to Give," "Stella Blue," "Bird Songs" and "China Doll." The work also features a symphonic jam session during "Stella Blue." In keeping with The Dead's performance style, Pro Video Group of Baltimore will recreate a psychedelic video display behind the orchestra during this performance.

Work began on the symphony in 1995, shortly after Jerry Garcia's death, when record producer and Deadhead Mike Adams contacted Johnson with the idea for the symphony. "I wasn't a Deadhead at the time, so I had to start at the beginning," Johnson said. "I bought everything The Dead had published and became a student of their art. I would finish a movement or two and gather up those that loved The Grateful Dead and see what happened when I played it for them. Their honest reactions told me everything. Tears, smiles, closed eyes and sometimes dancing. Any new movement that didn't create a genuine vibe in the listening room went away for good."

The culmination of Johnson's hard work paid off in 2007 when the Russian National Orchestra recorded and released Dead Symphony No. 6. The August 1st performance will be the first time Dead Symphony No. 6 is performed live.

Lee Johnson, composer

Lee Johnson has conducted and recorded with several world-class orchestras including the Russian National Orchestra, London Symphony Orchestra, Taliesin Orchestra, London Session Orchestra, American Rock Orchestra and Cyberlin Philharmonia. During his career, he has composed six symphonies, four musicals, two operas and numerous chamber works, concerti, choral and vocal works. He has also composed music for ballet, theater, feature and experimental film and hundreds of works for multimedia and interactive technologies.

Among his numerous accolades for original compositions, Mr. Johnson has received an Emmy Award (1991, "It May Not Be Tara"), was named Georgia Artist of the Year (1995) and has won ASCAP (1993) and ADDY (1996) awards. Mr. Johnson is currently a full-time Callaway Professor of Music Chair at LaGrange College in Georgia.

About the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra

The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra (BSO) is internationally recognized as having achieved a preeminent place among the world's most important orchestras. Acclaimed for its uncompromising pursuit of artistic excellence, the Baltimore Symphony has attracted a devoted national and international following while maintaining deep bonds throughout Maryland through innovative education and community outreach initiatives.

The Baltimore Symphony made musical history in September 2007, when Maestra Marin Alsop led her inaugural concerts as the Orchestra's 12th music director, making her the first woman to head a major American orchestra. With her highly praised artistic vision, her dynamic musicianship and her commitment to accessibility in orchestral music, Maestra Alsop's directorship has ushered in a new era for the BSO and its audiences.

Each season the BSO plays host to some of the world's most renowned talents, including violinists Hilary Hahn and Joshua Bell, and cellist Yo-Yo Ma. In addition to its year-round classical programming, the BSO has been praised for its popular concerts. In recent years, the BSO has performed with artists such as Elvis Costello, Alison Krauss, Ben Folds and The Decemberists. For more information about the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, visit BSOmusic.org.

COMPLETE PROGRAM INFORMATION

Dead Symphony: A Symphonic Tribute to the Grateful Dead

Friday, August 1, 2008 at 8:00 p.m. — Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall

Lee Johnson: Dead Symphony No. 6 (WORLD PREMIERE PERFORMANCE)

Special anniversary pricing at the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall is made possible by generous underwriting from the PNC Foundation.

Media sponsorship is provided by WBAL 1090AM.

Tickets for this program range from $20 to $60 and are available through the BSO Ticket Office, 410.783.8000, 877.BSO.1444 or BSOmusic.org.

The Gabe Dixon Band's New Album Streets August 26th, 2008

Gabe Dixon- for the Grateful Web

The Gabe Dixon Band's new self-titled album, due out on Fantasy Records on August 26, is in fact the group's third release, following the 2002 album On a Rolling Ball and the 2005 EP Live at World Café. But there's good reason Dixon, the band's writer/singer/pianist, considers it the GDB's debut.

Formed nine years ago by Dixon — then a classical piano major — and his two college roommates, bassist Winston Harrison and drummer Jano Rix, the group added a sax player and spent several years specializing in jazz-inflected, heavily improvised excursions, showcasing the virtuosity of the players. Dixon's elevated piano chops subsequently led to performances with Alison Krauss, O.A.R. and no less than Paul McCartney who tapped Dixon to play keyboards on his Driving Rain album and back McCartney and others on the internationally broadcast 9/11 tribute "Concert For New York City."

Offered the keyboard slot for McCartney's world tour, Dixon respectfully declined to focus on his own band and its then-yet-to-be-released debut album. But after a bout of cutbacks and regime changes at Warner Bros., the band's original label, the band reinvented itself as a three-piece song-based unit. The band's rededicated attention to arrangement, classic song-craft, and performance can be heard on the band's eponymous new album, The Gabe Dixon Band.

The trio cut the album live off the floor during ten days at Nashville's renowned Blackbird Studios with co-producer/engineer mixer Neal Cappellino (Alison Krauss, Mindy Smith, Jonny Lang) and with bassist Harrison doubling on "mandotar," a modified guitar he created whose sound somewhat resembles that of an electric mandolin. The album embeds vividly detailed, intensely personal and universally relatable songs in elegant yet muscular settings that draw, unabashedly and expertly, on classic rock.

The Tennessean, the newspaper in the band's hometown of Nashville, called it early when it stated in 2005 that the young artist "deserves to join the ranks of Jackson Browne and early Elton John in the pop pantheon." The piano-driven band has also rated favorable comparisons with the Ben Folds 5 and Bruce Hornsby.

Both the material and the supple arrangements result from "the music we heard growing up, listening to our parents' record collections," Dixon points out. "Mostly '70s LPs by Elton John, Jackson Browne, Paul Simon, Stevie Wonder, Ray Charles, Joni Mitchell, Bob Dylan, Carole King and James Taylor. It was a magical era, the pinnacle of pop, rock and folk in terms of songwriting and musicianship." Dixon and his bandmates have not only assimilated those influences but brought them back into the present tense, resulting in music that is instantly familiar both musically and thematically, yet still provocative and in the moment.

Given the band's innate feel for rock's glory days, it was fitting that the legendary Henry Diltz, whose unforgettable photos of The Doors and Crosby, Stills & Nash have become an indelible part of rock history, shot the album cover images.

While Dixon wrote all the album's songs, three were co-written by onetime Trip Shakespeare and Semisonic frontman Dan Wilson, whose co-write of "Not Ready To Make Nice" with the Dixie Chicks earned him a Grammy. Two songs were co-written with gifted Nashville songsmith Tia Sellers, who won a Grammy of her own for Lee Ann Womack's "I Hope You Dance." For the ballad "Further the Sky," Dixon duets with Mindy Smith, herself a Grammy nominee, at her most inspired.

Of the newfound song focus of his onetime jam band, Dixon says, "We love great songs and real musicianship, and we take time as a band to come up with something that isn't typical, because the arrangement and performance can be just as impactful as the song itself. We've become more refined, and to the point, making the impact direct and immediate. The idea is pretty simple, really: We're dedicated to playing music people like that we like too."

From this immensely promising vantage point, it's been quite a journey for a guy who a decade ago was playing Tootsie's Orchid Lounge in downtown Nashville every afternoon from 1 to 5 for tips. The bridge of the song "All Will Be Well" could serve as the credo for Dixon and his bandmates: "You've got to keep it up and don't give up and chase your dreams," he sings, "and you will find, all in time."

YARD DOGS ROAD SHOW ON TOUR IN AUGUST

- for the Grateful Web

The Yard Dogs Road Show is a hobo cabaret, a living patchwork of vaudeville and rock and roll. Last spring they sauntered through the Northwest with their Cabaret Blitz! Tour.  Most recently, the troupe left Oregon Country Fair audiences breathless. This month, the Yard Dogs will return to the Northwest at intimate venues in select cities, performing with Louisiana's restless musical storyteller Gill Landry at Seattle's Triple Door and Portland's Doug Fir Lounge (www.myspace.com/gilllandry). In addition, the Yard Dogs Road Show will share the stage once again with Portland's own Vagabond Opera, this time in Boise, for a late-night shebang with New Belgium Brewery's Tour De Fat (www.vagabondopera.com).

Yard Dogs Road Show are pure visual and sonic voodoo. It's a true story on stage: sword swallowers, dancing dolls, fire eaters and sunset hobo poetry - all animated by the live sounds of the Yard Dogs cartoon heavy band. Born from the saloon vaudeville that toured the Wild West in the late 1800's and slammed into the underworld of modern American road culture. The Yard Dogs create a timeless space for the union of ancient theatrical alchemy and modern pop culture.

Current west coast confirmed show details are as follows:

Sunday, August 12th and Monday, August 13th

Triple Door

w/ Gill Landry

216 Union Street, Seattle

Tickets $20.00 Advance, $22.00 DOS / All Ages Welcome

For more information please visit www.tripledoor.com

Saturday, August 18th and Sunday, August 19th

Doug Fir Lounge

w/ Gill Landry

830 East Burnside Street, Portland

Tickets $15.00 Advance, $17.00 DOS / Ages 21 + Welcome

For more information please visit www.dougfirlounge.com

Saturday, August 25th

The Bouquet

Co-headlining w/ Vagabond Opera

1010 West Main Street , Boise

Tickets $12.00 / All Ages Welcome

New Belgium Tour De Fat after-party

For more information please visit www.thebouquet.net

Look for Yard Dogs Road Show on the East Coast this fall.  Visit www.madisonhousepublicity.com

With the publication of his book, Hobo: A Young Man's Thoughts on Trains and Tramping in America (Random House / 2003), straw boss and founding member Eddy Joe Cotton and the Yard Dogs Road Show surfaced into the mainstream media, including recent recognition in SPIN Magazine. As the San Francisco Weekly reviewed, "Many wandering youngsters identify with the label "tramp artist," but few have taken it to the top-hat perfection quite like Eddy Joe Cotton…[Eddy] and the Yard Dogs Road Show do their neo-vaudeville thing the only way it should be: with flash, panache and an underlying sense of menace."

Bringing rock & roll to theatre and theatre to rock & roll, Yard Dogs Road Show has collaborated with Teatro Zinzanni, Cirque Du Soleil, and Burning Man and have performed such renowned festivals as Bonnaroo, Vegoose, Oregon Country Fair and Wakarusa.

There is some speculation as to the origin of the Yard Dogs Road Show.  Not for the want of mystery but for the difficulty in translating an experience that was navigated by the overly-romantic and sleep deprived. Shows came and went leaving very little time to fully comprehend what was going on.  Some say the carnival-inspired performance art of the Yard Dogs Road Show began as a three piece jug band performing in road houses and dance halls and at informal gatherings, including Oregon's modern day acid tests with Ken Kesey and The Merry Pranksters. Some say they traveled in a 1967 Ford Galaxy 500 and the evolution of their show revealed itself in the flames of a campfire on Dog Creek Road: dancing dolls with feather fans, an hombre in silver sunglasses eating fire, a dreamy guitar boy with golden locks, a bearded swami capable of conjuring the supernatural. Others say this story is complete hogwash and it was actually the brainchild of a unemployed "cowboy" and his faithful muse – transient artists with an incredible talent for brainstorming impossible ideas while under the influence of poppy tea and wishful thinking.  By chance these conversations were overheard by an ambitious young poet who decided to actualize them for the sake of all impossible dreams everywhere.

Either way, that was seven years ago, and the unlikely troupe of gypsies has been performing on stages ever since.

Gathering of the Vibes - August 12th, 13th, & 14th

Greetings Friends,

It's with great pride & excitement that we are now able to announce that we've been welcomed back to the Town of Duanesburg to join our friends at the Indian Lookout Country Club to celebrate the 10th Annual Gathering of the Vibes, August 12, 13 & 14, 2005!

Friends of Cheese (August 2000)

- for the Grateful Web

Who is The String Cheese Incident?

  • Michael Kang electric mandolin, acoustic mandolin, violin
  • Bill Nershi six string acoustic guitar
  • Keith Moseley five string electric bass, four string acoustic bass
  • Michael Travis drums, congas, djembe, talking drum, percussion
  • Kyle Hollingsworth piano, organ, Rhodes accordion

    Masters of improvisation, The String Cheese Incident has reached the cusp of an explosive national breakthrough through outstanding live performances and a dedication to touring. Now averaging over 160 shows a year, the band has attracted fans of all genres by mixing high energy fun with rigorous musicianship and impassioned artistry.

    The String Cheese Incident crafts undeniable masterpieces from an astonishing mix of roots musics, with intricate mountain bluegrass, transcendent Afro-pop rhythms, sensuous Latin melodies and breezy Calypso grooves that branch from a trunk of traditional American rock. The String Cheese Incident not only weaves together these incredibly diverse musical elements, it creates an entirely new sound in the process.

    This Boulder, Colorado based quintet has leapt into the collective conciousness of several grassroots scenes at once. Fans of bluegrass, reggae, jambands and other roots genres have strongly embraced the creative milestone that is SCI's music, as well as the band's ability to create a relaxed, fun environment at every show, or Incident, as they are better known.

    The symbiotic, audience-band relationship that develops into a rich atmosphere at each Incident lead the band to provide a new level of fun and music to their fans in 1998 through several international Incidents, in both Negril, Jamaica, and Akumal, Mexico. More international shows are currently being planned.

    Pioneers of both music and the business of music, The String Cheese Incident has steadfastly refused to compromise any amount of creative control over its music by signing with a major label. Applying the grassroots ethic that has made the band into successful touring artists,The String Cheese Incident instead chose to launch a full-scale label, Sci Fidelity Records. The band now continues to build its grassroots empire with a website that attracts one million hits a month, an in-house ticketing service and a travel agency designed to cater to their fans.

    While the band's Incidents have become the stuff of legend, it is in the studio that The String Cheese Incident distinguishes itself in craftsmanship. Buoyed by the 1998 release "Round The Wheel," which has become the band's best selling album to date with its mix of richly textured arrangements and tight, ear-catching pop tunes, Sci Fidelity Records and The String Cheese Incident are currently choosing tracks for a live double album that will be released in early fall.

    The String Cheese Incident received the honor of opening and closing the 1998-99 New Year's Eve Celebration at the Kaiser Auditorium in Oakland, CA, with remaining members of the Grateful Dead and Hot Tuna. The band's success on a massive U.S. tour in the spring of 1999 culminated in three sold-out shows at the legendary Fillmore Auditorium in San Francisco, and a string of sold out shows along the east coast.

    In June, The String Cheese Incident returns to the Telluride Bluegrass Festival as a headlining act, where they stole the show as the opening act in 1993, just six months after their official formation. This summer, the band will also headline both the High Sierra Music Festival and the Oregon Country Fair. Looking towards the millennium, The String Cheese Incident will host a two-night New Years extravaganza in Portland, OR that will encompass a "world-music" theme on a scale of grand proportions.

    The creative and musical foundation that constitutes the essence of The String Cheese Incident is always evolving with the band's musical tastes and their interaction with the fans in the live setting. The albums speak volumes and the critical acclaim rises, but there is no substitute for a live "Incident".

    - Image and text from The String Cheese Incident official website, www.stringcheeseincident.com

  • Mark Karan (August 2000)

    - for the Grateful Web

    When Mark Karan takes a break from life on the road as lead guitarist with Bob Weir's RatDog, what does he do for fun? He hits the highway with his own band!

    Since 1998, Mark has been touring with offshoots of the Grateful Dead (including The Other Ones, Mickey Hart's Planet Drum and Bobby Weir's Ratdog).

    Before crossing over into the land of the Dead, Mark worked his guitar voodoo for the likes of Dave Mason, Paul Carrack, Delaney Bramlett, the Rembrandts, Huey Lewis, Jesse Colin Young, Alex Call and Sophie B. Hawkins

    .

    Mark has appeared on the Today Show, Austin City Limits, Regis and Kathy Lee, and Late Late Night with Craig Kilborn, in addition to numerous radio stations nationwide, and has been making fans around the country. You can hear why on his bands CD entitled "Jemimah Puddleduck" (Quacktone Records/available at www.markkaran.com). In addition to original songs like "Time Will Tell" & "Rock Your Papa", Mark covers a wonderfully eclectic range of material… from the stanky funk of Johnny Guitar Watson's "You Can Stay (But the Noise Must Go)" to the aching country-soul of Gram Parsons' "She"… from the reggae tinged jamminess of Mark's take on Peter Tosh's "Don't Look Back" to a raucous rave-up like Lowell George's "Teenage Nervous Breakdown" with vocals by Mark's ever-funky bassman, Bob Gross.

    Other available recordings featuring Mark on guitar include both "Evening Moods" (2000) and"Live At Roseland" (2001) with RatDog, The Other Ones' "Only The Strange Remain" (1999), "Sounds From Home" by Delaney Bramlett (1998), "Spin This" (1998) by The Rembrandts…Whether with "Jemimah Puddleduck" (Mark's band with premier drummer John Molo) or one of the many combinations of well known musical talent and wonderful "lesser known" players, we've taken to calling "Mark Karan's Buds", Mark brings his soulful blues-based vocal stylings and passionate, inspired guitar work to some of the tastiest tunes around… a passionately delivered mix of rock meets R&B, with flashes of folk, blues, reggae, jazz and whatever other muse might pay a visit in the moment… often surprising… always "the real deal"… Mark Karan.

    Mark Karan uses PRS, Gibson and Fender guitars, A. Brown Soun "Tone Tubby" cabinets, Two-Rock amplifiers, and Pyramid Strings

    Curious Yellow (August 2003)

    - for the Grateful Web

    Named after the controversial Swedish film I Am Curious: (the Yellow Film) Denver-based indie-rock quartet, Curious Yellow, had its beginnings in early 2001.

    After fronting a couple bands in the mid 90s in California and spending the next several years developing his musical and songwriting talents in Japan and Minneapolis, Adam Lancaster landed in Denver in 2000 and founded the band.

    The band took on many formations and seemingly endless lineup changes for about a year until the perfect complimentary additions of Gregg Rosenthal (drums), Josh Eckhoff (guitar), and Matt Novack (bass, vocals) created a sound and style beyond what Adam could have hoped for. This new talented group immediately began writing songs and reworking old songs to create music and a performance that attracts and engages every listening audience. The personal and musical bond between each member deepened quickly and the dedication from everyone to develop the band to its fullest possibilities is evident.

    Now that they fill rooms at venues like the Bluebird Theater at home, they've set their sites on a touring schedule to increase national notoriety and label interest. Curious Yellow has independently released one E.P. (1-2-3 Go Go Go) and plans to start work on their second release in May 2004, upon return from a spring tour.