band

Phish In Colorado for Labor Day Weekend

Phish will close their 2011 Summer Tour with three consecutive nights at Dick's Sporting Goods Park in Commerce City, CO over Labor Day weekend (September 2, 3 and 4). Onsite camping will be available in the lush soccer fields adjacent to the stadium. Colorado was the site of Phish's first extended tour outside of the Northeast, and the band has enjoyed a special connection with the community ever since. These additional dates will be the last announced by the band for the Summer and Fall.

An online ticket request period is currently underway for the Dick's Sporting Goods Park shows at http://phish.portals.musictoday.com/ and will conclude at noon ET on Monday, May 23. Tickets will go on sale to the general public beginning Saturday, June 4, at 10:00 AM MT.

Phish kicks off their 2011 Summer Tour on Memorial Day weekend, with three consecutive nights (May 27, 28 & 29) at Bethel Woods Center for the Arts in Bethel, NY. Stops along the way include Cleveland, Cincinnati, Mansfield, Darien Lake and more, as well as 2-night runs in Holmdel, Columbia and Alpharetta. The band also plays host to Super Ball IX, their own 3-Day Festival over Fourth of July Weekend in Watkins Glen, NY. Phish then hits the West Coast for shows at The Gorge, a sold out night at the Hollywood Bowl and two sold out shows in scenic Lake Tahoe, followed by a stop at Outside Lands in San Francisco and three sold out nights in Chicago.

For complete ticketing info, please visit www.phish.com/tours.

National Jazz Museum in Harlem May 16 - May 22, 2011

Upcoming events at the National Jazz Museum in Harlem for this week include:

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Tuesday, May 17, 2011

Jazz for Curious Listeners

Tito Puente Month: Presented by Joe Conzo and special guests

7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

The Jazz Years

The 60’s saw Puente fully immersed in his passion to combine Jazz and Latin music. A passion thatwas fueled by his mentors Machito and “Hall of Famer” Mario Bauza. It had been his belief that this “marriage” could become a powerful force in music, thereby enhancing the musical experience of the listener and dancer.

He teamed up with bandleader and trombonist Buddy Morrow and began a series of recording sessions where both of them performed with two full and completely different orchestras. The project culminated in the LP recording “Revolving Bandstand” under the RCA label.

With this recording, Latin Jazz received a shot in the arm. It would have a direct affect on some of the younger musicians that would be making a name for themselves in the years to come, notably, Ray Barretto, who first played with Puente in “Dance Mania” and also recorded on the “Revolving Bandstand” sessions.

Thursday, May 19, 2011

Harlem Speaks

Bennie Wallace, Saxophonist

6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Tenor saxophonist Bennie Wallace made waves throughout the jazz world in the late 1970's with his debut recording, The Fourteen Bar Blues. Thereafter, with an unflagging respect and affection for classic jazz, he repeatedly represented his own progressive take on the music. His talent for composing and arranging music attracted the attention of Hollywood moviemakers in the late 1980's, which led him to spend nearly a decade in California composing and directing film soundtracks. Wallace's music has developed a more lyrical sense, yet his rhythms retained an authentic style that belonged uniquely to Wallace, according to critics. Winner of Germany's Deutscher Schallplattenpreis, the jazz Grammy equivalent, and a five-time winner of the Down Beat magazine award for Talent Deserving Wider Recognition, the full impact of Wallace's talent remained yet to unfold into the new century.

Born Bennie Lee Wallace Jr. on November 18, 1946, in Chattanooga, Tennessee, Wallace began playing clarinet in his youth from the age of 12 when a music teacher at his school started a jazz band and taught the group about great jazz musicians like Count Basie, Charlie Parker, and Miles Davis. Later, Wallace played in the high school band and added tenor saxophone to his teenage repertoire. Despite his youth, he learned his way around the after-hour jazz clubs even while he was still in high school in Chattanooga. During his late-night excursions, Wallace participated in jam sessions, playing bebop and blues most frequently. He went on to study music at the University of Tennessee and received a bachelor's degree in clarinet studies in 1968. After college during the mid 1970's, he did some composing for a German radio orchestra although his first love was jazz saxophone. Even during a stint in Hollywood during the late 1980s and into the 1990's, Wallace maintai ned to interviewer Zan Stewart of the Los Angeles Times that his horn remained the focal point of his music and of his life.

After his arrival in New York from Tennessee, Wallace spent 1973 studying the old jazz masters and their music to discover the essence of each, focusing heavily on Johnny Hodges and Coleman Hawkins. Yet despite his in-depth study of historical jazz, Wallace disliked repertory bands and eschewed revivalist groups equally. He remained committed to personal definition in everything that he performed. It became evident that Wallace moved in a direction different from the bandwagon that typified so many of his contemporaries, with his styles rooted more closely in the work of Coleman Hawkins than with John Coltrane. In 1985, Wallace signed with Blue Note Records. His debut album for that label, entitled Twilight Time, remained a favorite for many years

In 1991, in an unanticipated career shift, Wallace moved his residence to Pacific Palisades in Southern California to be near the Hollywood film industry as he became involved in composing for films. The opportunity came as a result of his 1985 Blue Note release, Twilight Time, which caught the ear of filmmaker Ron Shelton. Shelton requested that Wallace contribute to the soundtrack for the late-1980's film Bull Durham. Wallace obliged with "Love Ain't No Triple Play," written expressly for that movie. Also heard on the Bull Durham soundtrack was a reprise of Wallace's arrangement of "Try a Little Tenderness." Wallace went on to score the movie Blaze and served as musical director the film White Men Can't Jump.

During this time, Wallace worked extensively with pianist Tommy Flanagan in creating film music. Additionally, Wallace worked behind the scenes as a docent of pianist Jimmy Rowles after Wallace, having settled in California, contacted Rowles completely without introduction. Regardless, a comfortable relationship bloomed between the two, as Rowles mentored Wallace not only in the mechanics of playing the piano, but also in the fine points of harmony. In 1993, Wallace released The Old Songs, an album which represented a culmination of the wisdom and inspiration that he derived from Rowles. He’s now back on the East Coast, living with his wife in Connecticut.

Friday, May 20, 2011

Harlem in the Himalayas

Colin Vallon Trio

7:00pm
Location: Rubin Museum of Art
(150 West 17th Street)
$18 in advance | $20 at door | 
For tickets: RMA Box Office or call 212-620-5000 ext. 344

Colin Vallon, piano
Patrice Moret, double-bass
Samuel Rohrer, drums

Get an insight into the international sounds of cutting edge jazz with the music of this band, which belongs among the most remarkable and fascinating which the Swiss scene has to offer. The 29-year-old Colin Vallon has everything an extraordinary musician needs: brilliant technique, personal expression, a sense for perfect timing and a very individual, musical language which he creates through the unusual sounds from his prepared piano. Together with bassist Patrice Moret and drummer Samuel Rohrer, he has developed an exciting multiple stylistics based on modern jazz, but from which it steps out into all directions possible. The trio lives out its dramaturgically excellent compositions in sensitive interplay.

Saturday, May 21, 2011

Saturday Panels
A Tito Puente Celebration
12:00 – 4:00pm

Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Join us for an afternoon with the music of the King of Timbales, Tito Puente.

El Rey de Timbales. Tito Puente more than earned first place among modern Latin jazz musicians, working continuously from 1937 to 2000, recording over 100 albums.

Puente started his professional career as a drummer in Noro Morales’ orchestra. He played briefly with Machito’s Afro-Cubans before being drafted into the U.S. Navy, where he played in a band led by famed swing band leader, Charlie Barnet. After his discharge, Puente took advantage of the G.I. Bill to study at the Juilliard School of Music, while working with a variety of Latin bands in New York.

Puente quickly became known as a sizzling arranger. Promoter Federico Pagani hired Puente after hearing him jamming with a group of players from Pupi Campo's band, and dubbed them the Picadilly Boys. Puente subsequently moved to Tico Records and changed the group's name to Tito Puente and his Orchestra. Through numerous changes in labels and musicians, Puente has been in front of his group ever since.

Puente's fame skyrocketed when promoter Max Hyman bought the Palladium dance hall and opened it as a nightclub just as the craze for dancing the mambo and cha-cha hit in the early 1950's. He recalled nearly 50 years later:

“It was the explosion of dance. Remember, the Palladium was a big dance hall. I've always maintained that without a dance the music cannot be popular. People became aware of a new dance--the Mambo--it was ‘in’ to learn to dance the Mambo no matter what part of society you came from. And so here was a place, the Palladium, where everybody could come to dance or learn the Mambo. Dance studios sent their students to the Palladium, where they could learn and see great dancers—ballet stars, Broadway stars, expert Mambo dancers—all in one place. And I geared my music to these dancers.”

Puente rode the wave on Tico, then switched to RCA for what some consider his best albums, including Top Percussion, Dance Mania, his top-seller, and Mucho Puente. In the early 1960's, he moved from cha-chas and mambos to the new pachanga style and rejoined Tico to record Pachanga Con Puente. His 1962 descarga (Latin jam) album, El Rey Bravo debuted Puente's composition, "Oye Como Va," which later became a huge pop hit for Carlos Santana. "Every time he plays 'Oye Como Va,' I get a nice royalty check," Puente said.

Puente suffered through the boogaloo craze ("Boogaloo meant nothing to me. It stunk.") and carried on into the rise of salsa in the early 1970's. He recorded several albums in collaboration with Celia Cruz, the "Queen of Salsa." In the early 1980's, he moved into more traditional Latin jazz for the Concord label, earning a Grammy award for Tito Puente and His Latin Ensemble on Broadway. Although he was criticized for leaning on a clichéd style in his performances and material, Puente rallied again in 1991 to capitalize on the popularity of Oscar Hijuelos' novel, The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love with the album, The Mambo King: 100th Album. It was actually something like his 112th, but who was counting at that point? Ever a trend-rider, Puente made his prime-time television debut in 1995 on an episode of "The Simpsons."

In 1997 Puente recorded 50 Years of Swing, a compilation of hits that celebrate his fifty years in the Latin music industry, and in 1999, he won his fifth Grammy for Best Latin Performance for his CD, Mambo Birdland. In the late 1990's, he was designated as a "Legend" by the Hispanic Hall of Fame, inducted to the Jazz Hall of Fame, received a star on the Walk of Fame in Hollywood, and received a Smithsonian Lifetime Achievement award. He suffered a heart attack soon after his last public appearance, in April 2000, with the Puerto Rico Symphonic Orchestra at the "Centro de Bellas Artes" in Puerto Rico.

Afrobeta Debut Album Out August 9th

Miami’s avant-dance duo recently announced the release of their debut full-length, Under The Streets, along with the first track from the album, “Nighttime.” Now the band has released a futuristic new video, for “Play House,” directed by Dutch director Ruben Van Leer, along with the details for the “Play House” single, which sees a digital release today (May 10th) on iTunes, Beatport and Amazon. The single will come packaged along with remixes by NYC legend Larry Tee, and Alexander Technique & Junior Sanchez!

Afrobeta’s unique (and diverse) sound transcends genre classifications. Cuci’s rapid-fire delivery, combined with Smurphio’s funky synths and head-bopping basslines, will keep you moving from start to finish on Under The Streets. The thirteen tracks that make up their debut album will undoubtedly ignite dance-floors around the world-the band has a sound that is universally irresistible.

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Click HERE or the Single Art Below to Watch the Futuristic Video For “Play House”

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Under The Streets Tracklisting:

Two Different Worlds
Do You Party?
Nighttime
As Long As You Like It
Play House
That Thing
Touch
Land Of Lost Lovers
Pistol Whip
Love Fur Life
Jealousy
The End
Love Is Magic

Gary Nicholson's New CD, Texas Songbook

Gary Nicholson is a musical renaissance man — a number one hit songwriter, a two time Grammy winning record producer, a guitarist, singer, and recording artist. A consistent presence on the upper reaches of the country chart hit parade for the last three decades, his associations and collaborations read like an honor roll of notable talent in country and beyond: George Strait, Ringo Starr, Garth Brooks, Jeff Bridges, Robert Plant, B.B. King, Fleetwood Mac, Gregg Allman, The Judds, Buddy Guy, Neil Diamond, Emmylou Harris, Bonnie Raitt, Del McCoury, The Neville Brothers, Vince Gill, Delbert McClinton, Etta James, John Prine, Keb’ Mo’, Waylon Jennings and Willie Nelson among them. His songs have been heard in the movies Crazy Heart, Major League, City of Hope, Message in a Bottle and Where the Heart Is. “I’m always curious about working with different people and styles,” he says.

He is also a true blue son of the Lone Star State whose love and pride for the place he calls home brims from every track of his Bismeaux Records album, Texas Songbook, due out June 21, 2011. Recorded in Austin with some of the finest players in the state, it features such guest stars as Joe Ely, McClinton, Marcia Ball, Randy Rogers, Ray Benson and Jason Roberts of Asleep at the Wheel on songs inspired by or about Texas by Nicholson himself and penned with Texans like the late Stephen Bruton, McClinton, Guy Clark, Lee Roy Parnell and others. It’s sure to satisfy anyone with a taste for swinging, two-stepping, and dancehall and honky-tonk style Lone Star country music.

The album leaps into a Lone Star state of mind from the opening track, “Texas Weather,” and keeps the theme dancing though “She Feels Like Texas,” “A Woman in Texas, A Woman in Tennessee,” “Lone Star Blues” (with Ely and Benson singing along, and just recorded by George Strait for his next album), “Talkin’ Texan” and “Texas Ruby” (with Ball on piano). The set includes the signature song “Fallin’ & Flyin’” from Crazy Heart, the infectiously swinging “Messin’ With My Woman” (with backing vocals by Benson and Roberts), “Same Kind of Crazy” (written with McClinton, who plays harmonica on the track and cut the song, as did George Strait on his Twang album), and “Listen to Willie” (a tribute to the Red-Haired Stranger with Stoney LaRue and Benson on vocals and Mickey Raphael on harmonica). It wraps up with “Bless Them All” (with the McCrary Sisters), “Live, Laugh, Love” (previously recorded by Texan Clay Walker), and the closing grace note of “Some Days You Write the Song” (the title song of the Grammy-nominated Guy Clark album, co-written with Clark and Jon Randall Stewart).

Nicholson’s impetus for making Texas Songbook was his recent induction into the Texas Songwriters Hall of Fame. “I’ve always wanted to make a truly country record,” he says of his fourth release in his own right. “So I figured, okay, if I’m going to do this, I’m going to do this in Texas with all Texas players and with songs co-written by Texans. I’m just going to make the most Texas record I can possibly make and have fun doing it.”

To do so, the first and only choice was to “go straight to Ray Benson.” Recorded at Benson’s Bismeaux Studio, the disc features Asleep at the Wheel members and associates Roberts (fiddle), David Sanger (drums), Floyd Domino (piano) and Kevin Smith (bass) as well as steel guitarist Tommy Detamore and accordion player Joel Guzman. “I couldn’t have made this record in Nashville and gotten this music,” notes Nicholson, a Music City resident for now more than three decades. “I could have come close. But I knew I could only make this album in Texas.” Plus for good measure include in the creative mix some honorary Texans from the state’s “north 40” of Oklahoma like guest singer and Lone Star/Red Dirt music scene hero LaRue and Kevin Welch, co-writer of “Listen to Willie” and now residing in the Hill Country town of Wimberley.

The trail that led Nicholson to becoming an integral and pervasive presence in the Nashville music industry and scene — and 26 ASCAP songwriting awards and nomination to the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame — begins in Garland in the Dallas/Fort Worth metroplex where he came of age within the fertile musical context of the mid 1950s.

He soon took up the guitar and started playing folk and country music, making his public debut in his school’s eighth grade talent show and winning it. Then along came The Ventures and Nicholson took up electric guitar. When he later came to believe that the Beatles “were the greatest thing ever” and heard area resident Freddie King, his fate was sealed. As a teen he played in such British Invasion-inspired bands as the Valiants, the Catalinas and the Untouchables.

While studying at North Texas State University in nearby Denton, Nicholson fell in with such other musical students as soon-to-be Eagle Don Henley and pianist/producer/arranger Jim Ed Norman, later president of the Warner Bros. Nashville label. He stayed busy by night in club bands, and was also recruited to tour with the Nazz after Todd Rundgren left the group. “They hired me because I had a Marshall stack and a Les Paul,” Nicholson recalls with a chuckle. Following a night in 1971 hanging out with Gram Parsons on a swing through Dallas by the American-music pioneer, Nicholson left college and, urged on by Parsons, moved with his band to Los Angeles.

His friends Henley and Norman soon followed as Nicholson went on to win his first publishing deal, scored his debut recorded cover by bluegrass star Doug Dillard, and inked a record deal with Kapp/MCA with his band, Uncle Jim’s Music. They rehearsed in the same building as budding star Linda Ronstadt, whose producer John Boylan helmed the first of the band’s two albums of Nicholson’s songs (with Norman on keyboards for the second), prized by collectors.

Not long after watching Henley join forces with Glenn Frey in Ronstadt’s band and then soar to superstardom in The Eagles, Nicholson married his college sweetheart Barbara and headed back to Texas in 1973. Despite the artistic boom in California, “I liked the music back in Texas better,” he notes. One reason why was an album by locals and fellow expatriates to L.A. who would also return home, Delbert & Glen (Clark).

Nicholson wound up doing stints as a guitarist in McClinton’s band throughout the rest of the 1970s. He also started a group called Hot Sauce that melded country-rock and blues and were sometimes joined by his guitar hero Freddie King at their weekly Sunday residency at Mother Blues in Dallas. He also sharpened his Western swing and country chops taking gigs throughout North Texas, and continued to hone his songwriting skills.

Then Norman tapped a Nicholson song, “Jukebox Argument,” for a recording by Mickey Gilley that ended up on the Urban Cowboy 2 soundtrack. His friend then invited him to relocate to Nashville to write for his publishing company in 1980. By 1984 he had joined the roster of legendary writers at Tree Publishing and nabbed his first No. 1 cut with “That’s the Thing About Love” by Don Williams. He has since written or co-written scores of country chart songs including such Top 10 gems as “One More Last Chance” (Vince Gill), “The Trouble With the Truth” (Patty Loveless), “She Couldn’t Change Me” (Montgomery Gentry) and Reba’s “When Love Gets a Hold of You.”

Nicholson showcased his skills as a producer on his 1995 solo debut, The Sky Is Not the Limit. Four albums for McClinton followed, two of them Grammy winners (Best Contemporary Blues Album) and another nominated, and to date the longtime friends have written some 40 songs together that Delbert has recorded. His other noteworthy productions include T. Graham Brown’s acclaimed Wine Into Water, New Day Dawning by Wynonna and the landmark Reunion by the Judds as well as discs by Chris Knight, Seth Walker and Pam Tillis plus Marcia Ball’s latest album, among others.

Soon after arriving in Music City Nicholson did his first session as a guitarist. His credit can be found on numerous albums since, especially when a taste of Texas C&W and blues is called for. He toured out of Nashville in his early years there with Guy Clark, Billy Joe Shaver, Tracy Nelson and Gail Davies until Bobby Bare advised him to leave his band and better spend his time at home writing songs. Now that his sons are grown, Nicholson is back out on the road and with his band Fortunate Sons, who put out an album in 2010, as well as gigging and making a record under his nom de blues Whitey Johnson. As Texas Songbook hits the market, he also gathers together a country band to share stages with Asleep at the Wheel over the summer of 2011.

Texas Songbook follows the form of his previous Nashville Songbook album that collected a number of Nicholson’s top country covers in his own versions. Given his Lone Star State roots, his latest disc is a truly special endeavor for the multi-talented musical artist. “I’m really proud of it,” he concludes. “It’s very important stuff for me. As great as Nashville is and has been to me, it will never take the place of Texas in my heart."

String Cheese Incident releases Winter Carnival 2011

The String Cheese Incident announces the digital release of Winter Carnival 2011, a live, 21-track compilation of songs culled from the band’s recent Winter Carnival run at Colorado’s brand new 1STBANK Center. Available exclusively at iTunes beginning May 24, 2011, Winter Carnival 2011 catches all of the energy and excitement from this epic run of hometown shows.

Four years had gone by since the last "Winter Carnival", The String Cheese Incident's annual celebration of ski slopes, music, Mardi Gras, and the Winter/Spring Solstice. From humble beginnings in Boulder in 1999, through seven years at Denver’s Fillmore Auditorium, the band's annual Winter Carnival run always offered up a chance to welcome SCI’s musical heroes, as well as a few emerging favorites, to share the stage. Guest highlights over the years are numerous, including Little Feat, Bruce Hornsby, Del McCoury Band, Warren Haynes, Los Lobos, The Funky Meters, Olatunji, Dr. John, Michael Franti & Spearhead, Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe - and the list goes on and on.

Picking back up the tradition, for Winter Carnival 2011 the band welcomed OTT, JD Crowe and the New South, and Ivan Neville's Dumpstaphunk to join them on stage at the celebration’s new home, the 1STBANK Center in Broomfield, Colorado. A brand new venue just outside of the band's hometown of Boulder, The String Cheese Incident had played there only once before – hosting the now-legendary “Fourmile Canyon Revival” benefit concert. Now, it was time for SCI to lay down roots at this venue that would run deep. And indeed the 1STBANK Center proved to be a natural fit for this epic run of "Incidents."

Check out Grateful Web's review of the Fourmile Canyon Revival.

The String Cheese Incident’s Winter Carnival 2011 Track List is as follows:

DISC 1
1. Betray The Dark
2. Cottonmouth
3. Pygmy Pony
4. Rosie
5. Will It Go 'Round In Circles
6. Rocky Road Blues
7. Let's Go Outside
8. Sand Dollar
9. Colorado Bluebird Sky

DISC 2
1. Rivertrance
2. Give Me The Love
3. Blue Bossa
4. Sweet Melinda
5. Big Shoes
6. Ramble On

DISC 3
1. Rhythm Of The Road
2. Dirk
3. Way Back Home
4. Black Clouds
5. Wanna Be Startin' Somethin'6. Black Clouds (Reprise)

Santah Premieres New Song & Tour Dates

Santah was born with their feet planted in the ground and their heads in the clouds. Composed of guitarist/vocalist Stanton McConnell, drummer Steven Plock, bassist Otto Stuparitz, and Tommy Trafton on keyboards, the quintet met at the University of Illinois and with their debut full-length record, "White Noise Bed," they have assembled a kaleidoscopic opus whose reach extends far beyond the Midwest.

Recorded at the late Jay Bennett's Pieholden Studios, where the band found its niche among the studio's forbearers of psychedelic Americana, "White Noise Bed" has a yin and yang aesthetic: sometimes sunny and sometimes stormy, but always running on audible elation. The band takes its cues from the power pop greats of the 70's such as The Raspberries and The Cars, and dresses them in a twangy haze, full of clever, lyrical nooks and crannies ala Wilco and Whiskeytown.

After finishing the record last May, Stan's sister Vivian joined the band, adding her passionate vocals and thoughtful guitar. They have since been touring the country and building their cult following; performing multiple sets at CMJ, SXSW and the Pygmalion Music Festival, and sharing the stage with the likes of Surfer Blood, Cults, Margot and the Nuclear So and So's, Pomegranates and Young the Giant.

Santah isn't just something the listener hears, it's something they feel. Be it a tropical aura of relaxation, the bittersweet mystery of growing up, or the lulling memory of a past love, Santah creates an original sonic journey for all.

Download "No Other Woman" exclusively @ FilterMagazine.com!

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Santah Live

10-May Milwaukee, WI Cactus Club 11-May Des Moines, IA Vaudeville Mews
12-May Iowa, City, IA The Blue Moose Tap House
14-May Chicago, IL Lincoln Hall
16-May St, Louis, MO Off Broadway
20-May Lexington, KY Cosmic Charlie's
21-May Chattanooga, TN Collective Warehouse
23-May Columbus, OH Rumba Café
24-May Detroit, MI Lager House
1-Jun Indianapolis, IN White Rabbit
3-Jun Pittsburgh 31st Street Pub
4-Jun New York City, NY Piano's *
7-Jun Brooklyn, NY Knitting Factory ^
8-Jun Cambridge, MA TT Bear's
10-Jun Charlottesville, VA Twisted Branch Tea Bazaar
13-Jun Atlanta, GA Smith's Olde Bar
16-Jun Nashville, TN Mercy Lounge
17-Jun Champaign, IL Cowboy Monkey
18-Jun Chicago, IL Beat Kitchen

* = w/ The Dig and Dinosaur Bones
^ = w/ Brian Bonz and Stationary Set

First Aid Kit Head Into The Studio With Producer Mike Mogis

First Aid Kid - the Swedish duo of sisters Klara and Johanna Söderberg - are currently recording with acclaimed producer Mike Mogis at his ARC Studios in Omaha, NE.They'll spend the next month working on the follow-up to their highly praised debut album, The Big Black & The Blue, released last year on Wichita Recordings. In addition to being known as a member of Bright Eyes and Monsters Of Folk, Mogis is a renowned producer who has worked with artists including The Concretes, Cursive, Lightspeed Champion, Rilo Kiley, Sea Wolf, and Pete Yorn, among many others.

"We met Mike at Austin City Limits last year. He saw our show there and we got talking about recording an album together," said Klara and Johanna. "Bright Eyes was the band that got us inspired to start making music, so working with Mike is quite surreal for us. We feel honored. So far things are going really well and we believe we're in the process of creating something very special. This truly is a dream come true."

First Aid Kit broke out last year with the release of The Big Black & The Blue, garnering praise from AOL Music's Spinner blog, NPR's All Songs Considered, Nylon, and SPIN ('Breaking Out' artist), among others, and earning spots on HearYa, Nylon, and PasteMagazine.com's 'Best of 2010' lists. The year proved to be one of 'firsts' for the young band, who were only 17 (Klara) and 19-years old (Johanna) at the time of the album's release.

March 2010 saw First Aid Kit perform in the US for the first time at SXSW, which they followed with their first stateside headlining tour in June that included a sold-out stop at New York's Mercury Lounge. In September, they toured Australia and released a 7-inch single for album standout "Ghost Town," which featured a spectral cover of Fever Ray's "When I Grow Up" as a B-side in tribute to mentor Karin Dreijer Andersson (Fever Ray, The Knife), whose label Rabid released their debut EP Drunken Trees in 2008. First Aid Kit returned to tour the US again in October, with stops at the Austin City Limits festival and the CMJ Music Marathon (featuring a second sold-out NYC show at Joe's Pub).

The band rang in 2011 with the January release of a Third Man Records Blue Series 7-inch that featured covers of Buffy Sainte-Marie's "Universal Soldier" (made famous in 1965 by Donovan) and the classic blues standard "It Hurts Me Too" (a song much loved by fans of Karen Dalton's 1969 folk-blues version), recorded with Jack White at his own Third Man Studios in Nashville, TN.

Ursa Minor Announces New Release & Show

Fronted and founded by New York singer/writer Michelle Casillas, Ursa Minor has become a mainstay in NYC’s indie rock scene. The band delivers a timeless mix of vocal driven pop-rock with a primal rhythmic undercurrent; sharp and urban, broad and free.
Ursa Minor’s debut LP Silent Moving Picture was released by Sonic Youth’s Steve Shelley, on Smells Like Records. It was a deep and darker picture, slow bumps in the night and big spaces, featuring Casillas’ swampy electric piano and shuddering vocals. Ursa Minor is a band of improvisers, grown from downtown roots. Over many years of live performances and writing, they have pursued their artistic bent without compromise, and coincidentally become a source of naturally catching melodies and themes of a broader life.
From Beaconpass: “This Spring will see the arrival of Ursa Minor’s follow up, SHOWFACE.  The sound is often bigger, louder, more pugnacious: this is the sound of a band playing whatever turns them on. Live, Ursa Minor has been known to take the Violent Femmes' sweet ballad "Please Do Not Go" and turn it into a smoldering reggae slow jam, somewhere between Blondie's version of "The Tide is High" and Patti Smith's "Birdland."  Singer Michelle Casillas and her band can wring every drop of feeling out of a song, whether it's loud or lowdown, sweet or seething.” Many of their peers, some of New York’s most celebrated innovators, are often spotted at their shows, including Norah Jones, Marc Ribot, Joan As Police Woman, and Bill Frisell.
SHOWFACE (Anthemusa Records) was produced by Tony Scherr (Bill Frisell, SexMob, Norah Jones, Lounge Lizards, Feist), who is also featured on guitar. Bass whiz Rob Jost (Imogen Heap, Bjork) and NY heavy hitter Robert DiPietro (Norah Jones, Josh Rouse) equally create the sound, contribute songs of great depth and strength, and sing harmony. Special guests include Chris Brown (Joan As Police Woman, Barenaked Ladies, Abrams Brothers) on organ, and Jim Campilongo (Martha Wainwright, Teddy Thompson) and Teddy Kumpel (Rickie Lee Jones) on guitars.
Ursa Minor kicks off their new release, SHOWFACE, at NYC’s Joe's Pub, Tuesday, May 24th at 7:30pm!

1st Annual Boulder Roots & Blues Summit at Fox & Boulder Theater

TheBluesMobile.com, 97.3 KBCO, Daily Camera & Colorado Daily are proud to present The 1st Annual Boulder Roots & Blues Summit at the Fox Theatre & Boulder Theater Friday, May 13th through Sunday, May 15th.

Tickets are On Sale Now for the First Annual Boulder Roots & Blues Summit, May 13-15, in historic Boulder, Colorado. The Fox & Boulder theaters are excited to host a taste of the roots & blues between two venues for three days of live music by some of the finest musicians in the industry. Join us at the Boulder Theater each day for the early shows, and then move to the Fox Theatre for the late-night shows.

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The final lineup is as follows:

Friday, May 13:

Lucinda Williams w/ Lionel Young at the Boulder Theater

Vieux Farka Toure and William Elliott Whitmore at the Fox Theatre

Saturday, May 14:

Leon Russell w/ Janiva Magness at the Boulder Theater

Davy Knowles with Hazel Miller Blues Band & Taylor Scott and Another Kind of Magic at the Fox Theatre

Sunday, May 15:

Sheryl Crow at the Boulder Theater

VIP Roots & Blues Summit Pass available Now for $325:

- Receive entry to all shows at the Fox & Boulder Theater May 13 – 15

- VIP Entrance to all shows

- Reserved seating for all shows at the Boulder Theater

- Reserved balcony for all shows at the Fox Theatre

- Limited edition 1st Annual Roots & Blues Summit silk screen poster

- Limited edition 1st Annual Roots & Blues Summit t-shirt

Get Familiar with The New Familiars

Justin Fedor, Josh Daniel, Daniel Flynn, and Patrick Maholland all grew up playing music in some form or fashion and together make up The New Familiars. Together they’ve created a crew of thick-skinned, rowdy, determined musicians and songwriters. Multi-instrumentalist talents of Justin and Josh keeps the ever evolving sound. Willie Nelson, The Band, My Morning Jacket, and Otis Redding are named as a few of their heroes. They’ve shared the stage opening or closing shows with Johnny Neel (Allman Brothers), Levon Helm (The Band), Del McCoury, Emmitt-Nershi Band, and the Infamous Stringdusters. They’re also happy to be in their fifth year in the festival circuit.

“It’s American rock and roll” they’ll tell you. As much as they love bluegrass, rock and roll, and country, they skirt along the edge of all three. Blossoming out of a music scene that’s birthed loads of bands that blur and bend genre lines, The New Familiars happily sit in that place. Regardless, they’ll keep you on your feet, and that’s the important part right?

Their album Between the Moon & The Morning Light is a milestone for their career, which brought band member changes, and united the members that remained. Songs about love, luck, traveling the road, and finding one’s place in the world are what will be heard on Between the Moon & The Morning Light. Recorded by Joe Kuhlmann at 34th & Hudson in Charlotte, North Carolina, and mixed by Dave Glasser at Airshow in Boulder, Colorado.

Guests like Bob Crawford (Avett Brothers),Tania Elizabeth (the Duhks, Mary Gauthier), Sam Quinn, assure a level of energy, quality, and talent that The New Familiars plan to continue to share throughout their recordings and touring.

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Tour Dates:

May 13 – Legal Grounds – Rutherfordton, NC
May 14 – NC Music and Beer Festival – Huntersville, NC
May 14 – Artisphere – Greenville, SC
May 20 – The Quarter – Gulfport, MS
May 28 – Jammin At Hippie Jacks – Crawford, TN
June 17 – Downtown After Five – Asheville, NC
July 4 – National Whitewater Center – Charlotte, NC
September 23 – Jammin At Hippie Jacks – Crawford, TN