charles

Lady Antebellum Reveals New Album Details!

Multi-PLATINUM country music group Lady Antebellum is sharing new details today on their forthcoming third Capitol Nashville studio album OWN THE NIGHT, in stores Sept. 13.

After sweeping the 2011 GRAMMY Awards earlier this year, the singer/songwriters returned to Nashville to focus on writing and recording the follow up to their top selling NEED YOU NOW.  The trio penned 10 of the new disc’s 12 tracks, including their fastest rising and current Top 10 single “Just A Kiss.”  Collaborating again with veteran producer Paul Worley, Lady Antebellum’s Dave Haywood, Charles Kelley and Hillary Scott also return as co-producers.

"We're definitely more in tune with each other musically and personally than ever," said Haywood. "It's an exciting place to be. This album was created from the ground up—we are writing these songs, playing these instruments and creating these arrangements.  With OWN THE NIGHT, more than ever before, I think we share a real feeling of accomplishment both as a band and as friends.”

"Our only hope and expectation for this record is that it will build on the first two," adds Charles Kelley.  "At the end of the day, we just want our fans to be able to say that we continue to give them solid albums with solid songs they can enjoy from start to finish."

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OWN THE NIGHT Track List:

1. We Owned The Night

2. Just A Kiss

3. Dancin’ Away With My Heart

4. Friday Night

5. When You Were Mine

6. Cold As Stone

7. Singing Me Home

8. Wanted You More

9. As You Turn Away

10. The Love I’ve Found In You

11. Somewhere Love Remains

12. The Heart Of The World

'Ray Charles Live in Concert' captures The Genius in 1964

In the half-century between his earliest recordings in the 1950s and his death in 2004, Ray Charles ascended to icon status by leaving his mark on virtually every form of American popular music that emerged in the latter half of the 20th century. Nowhere was this more evident than in his live performances, where one was likely to hear shades of blues, soul, R&B, jazz, gospel, country, and more in a single evening — indeed, sometimes in a single song. To put it simply, the Right Reverend did it all.

All of these subtle shades and styles are evident in Concord Music Group’s April 5, 2011, reissue of Ray Charles Live in Concert. Originally released as a 12-song LP on ABC-Paramount in early 1965, Live in Concert captured Ray at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles in September 1964. More than four decades later, the CD reissue brings additional depth and perspective to the 1964 recording with the help of 24-bit remastering, seven previously unreleased tracks and extensive new liner notes that provide additional historical context to what is already considered a pivotal recording in Ray’s overall body of work.

“There could be no more uplifting live musical experience than digging Ray Charles and his mighty orchestra in their prime,” says roots music historian Bill Dahl in his new liner notes. Indeed, the 15-piece orchestra backing Ray on this date — assembled just a few years earlier in 1961 — boasted no less than a dozen horns, including formidable saxophonists David “Fathead” Newman, Hank Crawford, and Leroy “Hog” Cooper, all of whom had been with Ray since his days as a leader of smaller combos. “This amazing aggregation,” says Dahl, “was every bit as conversant with the intricacies of modern jazz as with the gospel-blues synthesis that Brother Ray pioneered during the mid-1950s, when he began accruing serious cred as the father of what would soon become known as soul music.”

Chris Clough, Concord’s manager of catalog development and producer of the Live in Concert reissue, notes that the Shrine Auditorium performance took place at a transitional moment in Ray’s career, just as he was transcending the confines of R&B and entering the mainstream by demonstrating a firm grasp of various other genres. “He’d made his ascendance in the early ’60s, and he had the world at his feet by this time,” says Clough. “He’d basically invented soul, he’d done R&B, he’d conquered country and he was on his way to becoming an American icon.”

In the span of 19 songs, Live in Concert illuminates the route to that destination. Ray wastes no time taking his audience on a ride from jazzy big band groove of “Swing a Little Taste” to the Latin-flavored “One Mint Julep” to the blues-gospel hybrid of his classic “I Got a Woman.” Although his live rendition of “Georgia On My Mind” on this date didn’t make the cut on the original LP, the song is a standout track on the reissue, thanks to his complex organ runs and the flute lines moving in counterpoint with his rich vocals.

Clough considers the yearning “You Don’t Know Me” and the previously unreleased “That Lucky Old Sun” to be among the high points of the recording. “It sounds like he’s really baring his soul on those two tracks, and they just sound incredible,” says Clough, noting that Ray was unaware that tape was rolling during this performance. “This particular date was at the end of their tour, and the performance seems a little loose as a result — in a good way, and in a less slick way.”

Further in, the rousing “Hallelujah, I Love Her So” is driven by a gospel groove and embellished with a sax solo by Newman that closely mirrors the original 1957 recording. The result is a familiar hit for an audience that’s more than ready to reinforce Ray’s foot-stomping beat with handclaps.

The sly and swaggering “Makin’ Whoopee” is delivered completely off the cuff, with drummer Wilbert Hogan, bassist Edgar Willis, and guitarist Sonny Forriest improvising an accompaniment behind what Dahl calls “Ray’s luxurious piano and breathy, supremely knowing vocals.” By all accounts, Ray spontaneously inserted the song into the set in response to the negative press he’d received overseas about his private life.

In the home stretch, Ray introduces the Raeletts, the female backing vocalists who served as his foil for some of his biggest hits. Together they work their way through “Don’t Set Me Free” (with Lillian Fort stepping forward for a duet with Ray), the comical “Two Ton Tessie” and the torchy “My Baby” before climaxing with the churning “What’d I Say,” a song tailor-made to stoke any room to a fever pitch.

A huge piece of the Ray Charles legacy is his mastery of any style he touched, and his ability to make it his own in a way that no other artist could — powers that can only come from an innate sense of adventure and spontaneity that are fully evident in Ray Charles Live in Concert.

“Few performers were less predictable onstage than Ray Charles,” says Dahl. “And nobody did it better.”

Teddy Charles Quartet at KItano | NYC

Teddy Charles is considered to be one of the great jazz vibraphonists and composers of all time, playing with such jazz legends as Charles Mingus, Charlie Parker and Miles Davis. As a student at Julliard in the mid 40s, he haunted New York's jazz clubs, occasionally sitting in with the bands on vibes or piano. His break came unexpectedly one night when he was asked to sit in on piano with Coleman Hawkin's band for the overdue Thelonious Monk. Soon after, Charles began to appear regularly with the top jazz groups of the day, Artie Shaw, Benny Goodman, Buddy De Franco, playing alongside and writing for such jazz stars as Coltrane, Parker, Max Roach and Miles Davis. Recently appeared with Max Roach, David Amram, Lee Konitz. In the early 1950s he began leading his own groups, composing, producing and recording original works such as No More Nights, Blues Become Elektra and Word from Bird.

TEDDY CHARLES QUARTET

FRI. & SAT. APRIL 23 & 24 SETS 8:00 PM & 10:00 PM

THE KITANO | NEW YORK
66 Park Avenue @ 38th St.
RESERVATIONS - 212-885-7119
VISIT OUR TWEETS AT: http://twitter.com/kitanonewyork
http://kitano.com/ email: jazz@kitano.com

Ray Charles' 'Genius + Soul = Jazz'

Ray Charles was best known for his work in the idioms of R&B, rock ’n’ roll and even successful forays into country. But he also recorded influential jazz albums, including the groundbreaking Genius + Soul = Jazz originally released in 1961, and continuing into the ’70s with My Kind of Jazz, Jazz Number II and My Kind of Jazz Part 3. On April 6, 2010, Concord Records will release a deluxe edition two-CD set featuring digitally remastered versions of all four albums including encyclopedic liner notes by Will Friedwald, jazz writer for The Wall Street Journal and author of several books on music and popular culture, along with original liner notes by Dick Katz and Quincy Jones.

Genius + Soul = Jazz was recorded at the Van Gelder Studios in Englewood Cliffs, NJ, in late 1960. The producer was Creed Taylor; arrangers, Quincy Jones and Ralph Burns. Ray Charles played the organ with three vocals (“I’ve Got News for You,” “I’m Gonna Move to the Outskirts of Town” and “One Mint Julep”) and band members included members of the Count Basie Orchestra: Thad Jones, Joe Newman, Billy Mitchell, Frank Wess, Freddie Green, and Sonny Payne among others. Issued originally on ABC Records’ legendary Impulse jazz label, the record ascended to the #4 spot on Billboard’s pop album chart, and spawned the very first singles on Impulse, heretofore an album label. “I’ve Got News for You,” rose to #8 R&B and #66 on the Hot 100. In addition, Charles’ version of “One Mint Julep” charted #1 R&B and #8 pop, and his rendition of the blues standard “I’m Gonna Move to the Outskirts of Town” reached #25 R&B and #84 pop.

As annotator Friedwald states, “Genius + Soul = Jazz . . . was a bold and innovative album, but, at the same time, a direct step forward from his earlier work.” Although Basie himself does not appear on the album, the Count was a major model as Charles assembled a full-scale, working orchestra. Basie also influenced his use of organ in a jazz context, and Charles was happy to record at the Van Gelder studio, where Jimmy Smith had recorded his classic Blue Note albums. Truly, as Dick Katz wrote in his original January 1961 liner notes, “The combination here of rare talent plus uncommon craftsmanship has produced a record that showcases the timeless quality and innate taste that is uniquely that of Ray Charles.”

Some nine years later, Charles recorded another jazz album, My Kind of Jazz. With sessions in Los Angeles this time, Charles surrounded himself with such players as Bobby Bryant and Blue Mitchell, trumpet; Glen Childress, trombone; Andy Ennis, Albert McQueen and Clifford Scott, saxophone; and Ben Martin, guitar. The album contained Charles’ own “Booty-Butt” (which was issued as a single on his own Tangerine label), Lee Morgan’s “Sidewinder,” and Horace Silver’s “Señor Blues.”

In his original liner notes to My Kind of Jazz, Quincy Jones wrote, “This album is the essence of what Ray used to tell us when we were kids: Be true to the soul of the material you’re dealing with.”

Jazz Number II was recorded roughly two years later at Charles’ Tangerine/RPM Studios and issued on Tangerine Records. Charles enlisted an impressive cast of arrangers: Alf Clausen, Teddy Edwards, Jimmy Heath and Roger Neumann.  The tracks included Ray Charles and Roger Neumann’s “Our Suite,” Teddy Edwards’ “Brazilian Skies” and “Going Home,” Thad Jones’ “Kids Are Pretty People” and Jimmy Heath’s “Togetherness.”

Finally, My Kind of Jazz Part 3, which concludes the Genius + Soul = Jazz deluxe package, was recorded in Los Angeles circa 1975, featured the Ray Charles Orchestra including Clifford Solomon, alto sax; Glen Childress, trombone; Johnny Coles, trumpet; Leroy Cooper, baritone sax; and James Clay, tenor sax. Included are compositions by Duke Ellington, Horace Silver, Jimmy Heath and Benny Golson. Issued on Charles’ own Crossover Records, the album reached #55 on the R&B chart in 1976.

The reissue of Genius + Soul = Jazz continues Concord Music Group’s long-term reissuing of the Ray Charles catalog in cooperation with the Ray Charles Foundation. Among the other albums repackaged in the past year are Genius Hits the Road, Modern Sounds in Country and Western Music, Message From the People, plus the career compilation titled Genius.

2010 University Of Michigan Jazz Festival "Charles Mingus Day"

The 2010 University Of Michigan Jazz Festival  "Charles Mingus Day" will take place February 13th at 7:30p.m. at the Power Center for the Performing Arts in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The festival announced today that Congressman John Conyers Jr. would receive the first, "University of Michigan John Conyers Jr. Jazz Advocacy Award". This award is named in his honor and serves as recognition of extraordinary achievement in the world of Jazz by an advocate or patron.

In recognition of Black History Month and the Jazz Festival tribute to Charles Mingus, three virtuoso bassists, Christian McBride, Robert Hurst and Rodney Whitaker, will take the stage together in an historic improvised performance.

The festival feature concert will also include the University of Michigan Jazz Ensemble, The Christian McBride Band and the Detroit Jazz Festival Orchestra under the direction of Dennis Wilson. The DJFO will feature a new composition by Christian McBride entitled "The Movement Revisited". This composition is an important expression of the Black experience through the language of Jazz and will also be performed on February 14th at 7:30pm at Second Ebenezer Church in Detroit.

The University of Michigan Jazz Festival is a noncompetitive event providing collegiate, high school and middle school students an opportunity to interact with the music faculty of the University of Michigan as well as other distinguished educators.  The Festival is open to students, educators, and music lovers of all ages and is presented by the School Of Music Theatre & Dance through the Department of Jazz and Contemporary Improvisation with additional support from numerous academic units within the University Of Michigan.

The Dynamites featuring Charles Walker Announce New Years Shows

The Dynamites Featuring Charles Walker today announce a very special New Year's run with indie rockers Band of Horses; two shows at The Tabernacle in Atlanta, Georgia on December 30 and 31.

Fresh off an epic European tour in support of their brand new studio album Burn It Down (released September 2009/Outta Sight Records), The Dynamites are living proof that soul music is here to stay.  With "deep grooved, superbad brashness" (Las Vegas City Life), Nashville's white-hot deep funk band are cooking up a "genuine soul revival" (Blurt Magazine) in even the most underground hipster circles.

The Dynamites will support Band of Horses for a scorching southern New Year's celebration.  Show details are as follows:

New Year's with Band of Horses and The Dynamites Featuring Charles Walker
Wednesday, December 30 and Thursday, December 31 @ 9 PM
The Tabernacle

152 Luckie Street NW, Atlanta
All Ages Welcome

For tickets and information visit www.tabernacleatl.com or call (404) 659-9022

For their 2nd LP, The Dynamites and their soul-shouting frontman Charles Walker deliver a slate of tunes that arrives right on time. It's a new day, and Charles Walker and his band have something to say. It's the kind of story where you gotta tear it down to rebuild it, the greedy man ultimately gets his due, love rules the day and everybody gets down in the end.  It's a timeless tale, as relevant as ever, and Burn It Down tells it in a righteously funky fashion. Strike a match, light the fuse and Burn It Down.

The release of Burn It Down marks the highly anticipated follow-up to Charles Walker & The Dynamites' first LP, Kaboom.  As the New York Times hailed:


"New York City has the Dap-Kings, Nashville has the Dynamites, whose approach is about three quarters James Brown with touches of Memphis, Motown and New Orleans. [And] The Dynamites have found a singer to put them across: Charles Walker, who has been on the soul circuit since the 1960s. His voice rivals better-known headliners; he's an authoritative, gospel-steeped shouter and a dramatic ballad builder. It's old-school music that works up a genuine sweat."


Charles Walker
doesn't imitate, emulate or try to resuscitate a bygone nostalgic era.  He is soul, the real deal, still carrying the flaming torch of funk and soul lit back in the late 60's at the Apollo Theater where he opened up for icons like James Brown and Wilson Pickett.  What's more, the fresh songwriting approach of Bill Elder, a.k.a. Leo Black, continues to push the deep funk envelope, propelling Walker to sound equally at home singing a scorching hot, up-tempo rocker as he does on a heart wrenching 60's-style soul ballad.

An essential authenticity comes across in The Dynamites music and message. Without a doubt, Burn it Down acknowledges that not all is right in the world, but it doesn't get stuck there. Times might be rough and people might be grumbling about doomsday, but Charles Walker and The Dynamites are here to remind us that "it's a sunny day." Sure we could bitch and moan. But we could just as well get down to some funky assed grooves and burn that negativity down.

The Dynamites are: Charles Walker (vocals), Bill Elder, a.k.a. Leo Black (guitar), Chris West (saxophones and flute), Jon-Paul Frappier (trumpet), Charles Treadway and Tyrone Dickerson (organ), Chris Patterson (percussion), Derrek Phillips (drums), Jonathan Jackson (saxophone) and Rich Brinsfield (bass).

The Dynamites Featuring Charles Walker Announce Fall Tour Dates

Soul music is here to stay, and it's still evolving. The Dynamites Featuring Charles Walker are living proof. Nashville's white hot deep funk band releases their highly anticipated second studio album, titled Burn It Down, on September 15, 2009. Look for the band on tour this Fall in support the new album.

For their 2nd LP, The Dynamites and their soul-shouting frontman Charles Walker deliver a slate of tunes that arrives right on time. It's a new day, and Charles Walker and his band have something to say. It's the kind of story where you gotta tear it down to rebuild it, the greedy man ultimately gets his due, love rules the day and everybody gets down in the end.  It's a timeless tale, as relevant as ever, and Burn It Down tells it in a righteously funky fashion. Strike a match, light the fuse and Burn It Down.

Don't miss The Dynamites on tour this fall.  The current list of tour dates is as follows:

August 28th, Fort Wayne Botanical, Fort Wayne, IN
August 29th, Sweet Corn Festival, Urbana, IL
August 30th, Stokie's Backlot Bash, Stokie, IL
September 11th, Mercy Lounge, Nashville, TN
September 12th, The Masquerade, Atlanta, GA
September 17th, Middle East Upstairs, Cambridge, MA
September 18th, Pianos, New York, NY
September 19th, The Note, Westchester, PA
September 20th, Southpaw, Brooklyn, NY
September 22nd, Beachland Tavern, Cleveland, OH
September 23rd, Schuba's Tavern, Chicago, IL
September 24th, Radio Radio, Indianapolis, IN
September 25th, Southgate House, Newport, KY
September 26th, TBA, Cleveland, OH
October 2nd, Tipitina's Uptown, New Orleans, LA

Additional dates to be announced.

The release of Burn It Down marks the highly anticipated follow-up to Charles Walker & The Dynamites' first LP, Kaboom.  As the New York Times hailed:

"New York City has the Dap-Kings, Nashville has the Dynamites, whose approach is about three quarters James Brown with touches of Memphis, Motown and New Orleans. [And] The Dynamites have found a singer to put them across: Charles Walker, who has been on the soul circuit since the 1960s. His voice rivals better-known headliners; he's an authoritative, gospel-steeped shouter and a dramatic ballad builder. It's old-school music that works up a genuine sweat."

Charles Walker doesn't imitate, emulate or try to resuscitate a bygone nostalgic era. He is soul, the real deal, still carrying the flaming torch of funk and soul lit back in the late 60's at the Apollo Theater where he opened up for icons like James Brown and Wilson Pickett. What's more, the fresh songwriting approach of Bill Elder, a.k.a. Leo Black, continues to push the deep funk envelope, propelling Walker to sound equally at home singing a scorching hot, up-tempo rocker as he does on a heart wrenching 60's-style soul ballad.

For soul veteran Walker, finding songwriter Bill Elder has been an epiphany. Importantly, he's found in Elder a songwriter that writes for his voice. This stands in sharp contrast to the days when he was asked to record songs whether they inspired him or not. "I didn't have the songs that I felt were right for me. Now I can pick and choose the songs I want to do. When I was with Chess and Decca I did what they wanted me to do." The result being that Walker is more relaxed and at ease in the studio. "I feel so confident now. I can remember being under so much pressure to try and get a hit record. Now I'm just in there doing what I like to do."

An essential authenticity comes across in The Dynamites music and message. Without a doubt, Burn it Down acknowledges that not all is right in the world, but it doesn't get stuck there. Times might be rough and people might be grumbling about doomsday, but Charles Walker and The Dynamites are here to remind us that "it's a sunny day." Sure we could bitch and moan. But we could just as well get down to some funky assed grooves and burn that negativity down.

The Dynamites are: Charles Walker (vocals), Bill Elder, a.k.a. Leo Black (guitar), Chris West (saxophones and flute), Jon-Paul Frappier (trumpet), Charles Treadway and Tyrone Dickerson (organ), Chris Patterson (percussion), Derrek Phillips (drums), Jonathan Jackson (saxophone) and Rich Brinsfield (bass).

Teddy Charles All Stars 'Word From Bird' at The Iridium

Teddy Charles- for the Grateful Web

Teddy Charles is considered to be one of the great jazz vibraphonists and composers of all time, playing with such jazz legends as Charles Mingus, Charlie Parker and Miles Davis. As a student at Julliard in the mid 40s, he haunted New York's jazz clubs, occasionally sitting in with the bands on vibes or piano. His break came unexpectedly one night when he was asked to sit in on piano with Coleman Hawkin's band for the overdue Thelonious Monk. Soon after, Charles began to appear regularly with the top jazz groups of the day, Artie Shaw, Benny Goodman, Buddy De Franco, playing alongside and writing for such jazz stars as Coltrane, Parker, Max Roach and Miles Davis. Recently appeared with Max Roach, David Amram, Lee Konitz. In the early 1950s he began leading his own groups, composing, producing and recording original works such as No More Nights, Blues Become Elektra and Word from Bird.

Teddy Charles All Stars "Word From Bird" - March 19-22, 2009 at the Iridium Jazz Club

IRIDIUM JAZZ CLUB
1650 BROADWAY (Corner of 51st)
NEW YORK, NY 10023
RESERVATIONS: 212-582-2121
Sets At 8:30 & 10:30PM

Ray Charles died today at 73.

- for the Grateful Web

Ray Charles, the Grammy-winning crooner who blended gospel and blues in such crowd-pleasers as "What'd I Say" and heartfelt ballads like "Georgia on My Mind," died Thursday, a spokesman said. He was 73. Charles died at his Beverly Hills home surrounded by family and friends, said spokesman Jerry Digney.