died

Dedication to Afro-Cuban Jazz: Art Blakey and Dizzy Gillespie

Creole Restaurant and Music Supper Club, located at 2167 Third Avenue (NE corner 118th St.), known for its great food according to ZAGAT, ambiance, and for bringing Jazz and R&B back uptown, proudly presents a Dedication to Art Blakey and Dizzy Gillispie for the inspiration of Afro-Cuban Jazz in America on Friday, April 9 and Saturday, April 10, 2010, respectively.  

Art Blakey (1919 – 1990) was a drummer, leader, composer and teacher, and co-founder the Jazz Messengers for 35 years. Blakey introduced congas to the sound of jazz in 1949, blending Afro-Cuban rhythms with straight ahead jazz.  After six decades of influencing Jazz around the world, Art died at the age of 71.

Dizzy Gillespie (1917 –1993) was a significant developer of the American jazz art form of bebop and modern jazz, and he was instrumental in founding Afro-Cuban jazz the infusion of Spanish rhythms.  He was a jazz trumpet player, bandleader, singer, and composer.  In the late 1940s, Gillespie was also involved in the movement called Afro-Cuban music, bringing Latin and African elements to great prominence and in the late 1940’s recorded with Chano Pozo and Mario Bauza.  Dizzy died at 75 leaving his legacy in Jazz and leaving Americans dancing to Afro Cuban jazz rhythms.

Creole Restaurant and Music Supper Club continues its tradition of being true to the American Jazz art form, by not forgetting jazz origins.  On Friday, April 9 and Saturday, April 10, 2010.  Grammy™ award winner Brian Lynch (trumpet), Grammy™ award winner Ian Smith (Alto Sax), Little Johnny Rivero (congas), Joel Forbes (bass), Todd Herbert (tenor sax) and “Killer” Ray Appleton (drums) will deliver an out of this world performance both nights, two sets each night, 7pm and 9pm with a $20 music cover charge. Doors open at 6pm and 8pm. Call 212-876-8838 ext.4 or visit their website for more information and to make reservations.

Vince Welnick Died Friday, June 2nd, 2006

Vince Welnick- for the Grateful Web

Vince died Friday, June 2nd.  He played keyboards with the Grateful Dead from September 1990 - August 1995.  Though he received a lot of criticism during his tenure, Vince was a loving, happy guy who played his heart out with the band.  Grateful Web sends our thoughts to his family and friends.  Thanks for your loving nature, Vince. We'll miss you...

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"No fear, no hate, could be greater then the size of;
The love that I am seeing deep in the eyes of;
All of my friends, True Blue"
Vince Welnick "Missing Man Formation"
 
 
This song by Vince Welnick was a key inspiration for Quixote's True Blue and the guiding spirit of each of the places that we created successively.  Vince Welnick, the last keyboardist for the Grateful Dead, passed away today, June 2nd.  This bright and charming keyboardist eagerly took the place of Brent Mydland in the Grateful Dead hotseat creating some very memorable moments in the golden days of the Grateful Dead.  He led me to a greater understanding of Jerry Garcia when he said that "he could be ornery at times, but I have never met a kinder gentler man in  my life.  When I first saw Jerry Garcia I believed in Santa Claus.  Everybody is asking the big question and love is the answer.  And I'll always believe in Santa Claus."  Shortly after Jerry Garcia died, Vince Welnick, created a band called Missing Man Formation which was probably the strongest post-Dead band that I ever saw.  In fact when I first saw this band in 1996 and they did the long forgotten song, Saint Stephen,I thought I was going to explode.  Yes, spontaneously combustion was on my mind and I was giddy like a child.  Vince also played at my wedding August 9th at Red Rocks with Gregg's Eggs.   He was all about love and his presence on that day made it all the more special.  His heart was full of compassion in a seemingly heartless world.  He left his mark on my family and will always be considered a member of it.  In short, he will be missed as a friend and a brother.
 
February 21st, 1951 - June 2nd 2006
 
Stay True Blue,

Coretta Scott King Died This Week At The Age Of 78

Coretta Scott King -- (1927-2006)- for the Grateful Web

Coretta Scott King was the wife of slain civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr. She gained an international reputation as an advocate of civil rights, nonviolence, international peace, full employment, and equal rights for women. She died at the age of 78.  She embodies everything good about human beings and were not for her, MLK's voice would not have shined so bright.

King remained largely in the wings of her husband's fight for civil rights, while participating in the Montgomery, Alabama, bus boycott and efforts to pass the 1964 Civil Rights Act.

After her husband was shot and killed on April 4, 1968, King stepped up efforts to promote nonviolence, fight poverty and began work establishing the Martin Luther King Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change in Atlanta. She also led the Coalition of Conscience, which sponsored the 20th Anniversary March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom in 1983.

Ray Charles died today at 73.

- for the Grateful Web

Ray Charles, the Grammy-winning crooner who blended gospel and blues in such crowd-pleasers as "What'd I Say" and heartfelt ballads like "Georgia on My Mind," died Thursday, a spokesman said. He was 73. Charles died at his Beverly Hills home surrounded by family and friends, said spokesman Jerry Digney.