july

Keller Williams announces Brand New Album and Summer Tour Dates

Keller Williams releases his first-ever all-covers collection, amusingly titled Thief, on May 25, 2010. Recorded with the Keels—husband and wife duo Larry and Jenny KeelThief includes songs originally written and recorded by as wildly diverse an assemblage as anyone’s ever likely to dream up.

Keller is on tour this summer - at solo shows, with The Keels, and even for a run of gigs as vocalist/guitarist in The Rhythm Devils, the project by Grateful Dead drummer Bill Kreutzmann and his partner percussionist Mickey Hart. Keller’s complete list of currently confirmed tour dates is included below.

Thief offers up Keller-versions of songs by an [almost] unthinkable collection of artists: from Amy Winehouse (“Rehab”) to the Grateful Dead (“Mountains of the Moon”), the Butthole Surfers (“Pepper”) to Kris Kristofferson (“Don’t Cuss That Fiddle,” which opens the album, and “The Year 2003 Minus 25,” which closes the album). The set is filled out with tunes by Ryan Adams, the Presidents of the United States of America, the Raconteurs, Patterson Hood, Danny Barnes, Cracker, the Yonder Mountain String Band and Marcy Playground. All over the place, indeed, but that’s the way Williams likes it. And in his hands it all makes sense—like everything he’s ever touched, whether from his own pen or someone else’s, it all becomes Keller Williams' music. Fans are encouraged to stay tuned for a big Thief pre-sale and contest announcement coming soon.

Keller’s thirst for music of all kinds has also led him to the world of radio. For the past seven years he has hosted Keller’s Cellar, a weekly syndicated program available on over 40 terrestrial stations and online. Williams describes the show as “a self-indulgent, hour-long narrated mix tape of stuff I’m into. It’s rule-less except for what the FCC says we can’t do. I don’t play contemporary country music. I don’t play contemporary Christian music—however, there is possibly some old gospel. I don’t play opera. Everything else is fair game. World music from all around—African music from all the countries, jazz, funk, reggae, techno, chill, lounge, lounge singers, rub-a-dub, dancehall. I pretty much stay away from smooth jazz. It’s definitely a fun outlet for me.”

Long considered one of the most unique and prolific performers in all of rock, the Fredericksburg, Virginia native is known for flying by the seat of his pants on stage, utilizing an unorthodox approach that centers around an Echoplex Digital Pro looping unit, which allows Keller to alternate between several instruments on stage.

Keller Williams’ Current Tour Dates:
Friday, April 16 Biltmore Cabaret Vancouver BC
Sunday, April 18 World Ski Festival Whistler BC
Thursday, April 22 WorkPlay Theatre Birmingham AL
Friday, April 23 Floyd's Tallahassee FL
Saturday, April 24 Freebird Live Jacksonville FL
Friday, April 30 Handle Bar Greenville SC
Thursday, May 13 Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Richmond VA
Sunday, May 16 The Hangout Music Festival Gulf Shores AL
Saturday, May 22 SmileFest - Deerfields Amphitheater Pinnacle NC
Friday, May 28 Bella Madre Music Festival Geneva MN
Saturday, May 29 Summercamp Chillicothe IL
Sunday, May 30 Delfest Cumberland MD
Keller Williams and Friends
featuring Jeff Austin and Keith Moseley
Thursday, June 17 Telluride Bluegrass Festival Telluride CO
Saturday, June 19 Clearwater Festival - Croton Point Park Westchester NY
Friday, July 2 Nateva Music & Arts Festival - Oxford Fairgrounds Oxford ME
Sunday, July 11 All Good Music Festival Masontown WV
Saturday, July 17 YMSB String Summit North Plains OR RHYTHM DEVILS
Sunday, July 18 Britt Festival Jacksonville OR RHYTHM DEVILS
Saturday, July 24 The Spud Drive In Driggs ID RHYTHM DEVILS
Sunday, July 25 Red Butte Garden Salt Lake City UT RHYTHM DEVILS
Saturday, July 31 Gathering of the Vibes Bridgeport CT RHYTHM DEVILS
Saturday, August 14 Mile High Music and Arts Festival Denver CO
Saturday, August 21 Hoxeyville Festival Cadillac MI

David Grisman Bluegrass Experience @ Boulder Theater

David Grisman is normally associated with the bluegrass wing of country music, but his music owes almost as much to jazz as it does to traditional American folk influences. Because he couldn't think of what to call his unique, highly intricate, harmonically advanced hybrid of acoustic bluegrass, folk, and jazz without leaning toward one idiom or another, he offhandedly decided to call it "dawg music" -- a name which, curiously enough, has stuck. A brilliant mandolinist, with roots deep in the Quintet of the Hot Club of France, Grisman's jazz sensibilities were strong enough to attract the admiration of the HCQ's Stephane Grappelli, who has toured and recorded with Grisman on occasion. 

David Grisman | July 20th, 2010

Tickets will be on sale through the Boulder Theater box office | Internet 24-7 at www.bouldertheater.com  | Phone: During box office hours 303-786-7030

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On Sale Apr 17
GA / All Ages/ $36.00

Ornette Coleman, Kruder & Dorfmeister & Gilberto Gil at Gent Jazz Festival

The Gent Jazz Festival (July7-July18) announces more names for the 2010 edition with Ornette Coleman, Pat Metheny Group, Gilberto Gil, Toots Thielemans, Kruder & Dorfmeister, Mariza, Kurt Elling, The Cinematic Orchestra en Stanley Clarke feat. Hiromi.

Also Christian Mendoza Group, Greg Houben Trio, Pierre Vaiana & Salvatore Bonafede feat. Manolo Cabras, Jungle Boldie will perform at the festival. Earlier the festival had already announced names like Norah Jones, Daniel Lanois Black Dub and Chick Corea Freedom Band.  Chronological survey of the program enclosed

Thursday July 8 the SABAM Jazz Awards will be presented at the Gent Jazz Festival. The winner in the category Confirmed Artist receives 10.000 Euro. In the category Young Talent, in collaboration with Jeugd & Muziek the winner will receive 5.000 Euro. The intention of this sum is to be used as a financial support for musical projects or to offer a push forward for the expansion of a future career of the musician. Sabam also hands out the Muse of Sabam. This is an additional award that is given to a Belgian jazz personality for his reputation and/or merits or because the artist has taken some successful actions to support the jazz scene.

Also this year the Gent Jazz Festival will organize jam sessions in the evening in collaboration with NH Hoteles. These jam sessions will take place each festival day in the medieval Trova basement of the NH Hotel Gent Belfort and begin at 23h30.  Entrance for free.

The Music competition ‘Young Jazz talent’, an initiative in collaboration with brewery Duvel-Moortgat will take place at the entrance of the Bijloke during the GJF period. The same selected groups will also perform a second time during the Ghent Festivities (July17-July 26).

Tickets cost 29 euros per evening (excl. booking costs), except for those of July 7 (concert day with Norah Jones) which cost 42 euros (excl. booking costs). A Three-Day Pass costs 73 euros (excl. booking costs). Tickets are available as of today. Tickets can be booked via www.gentjazz.com, or at FNAC. Just as last year, the last festival weekend coincides with the opening weekend of the Ghent Festivities.

Catch A Sneak Peek Of Crimson, White & Indigo At A Theatre Near You

On July 7, 1989 the Grateful Dead got together with some 95,000 close friends at JFK Stadium in Philadelphia. By the end of the day, all involved shared a highly improved outlook on life...Grateful Dead productions is pleased to present Crimson, White & Indigo, the entire full-length theatrical concert experience in fully mastered multi-track audio brilliance...

Don't miss a sneak preview of the Grateful Dead's Crimson, White & Indigo: Philadelphia, July 7, 1989 in theatres near you. Be sure to check your local listings for exact show times.

Philadelphia, PA
Ambler Theater
4/13/10

Gloucester, MA
Cape Ann Community Cinema
4/13/10

Rochester, NY
Little Theatre
4/15/10

New York, NY
City Winery
4/15/10, 4/16/10

Pasadena, CA
LAEM Playhouse
4/15/10, 4/17/10, 4/18/10

Los Angeles, CA
LAEM Sunset
4/15/10, 4/17/10, 4/18/10

Encino, CA
LAEM Town Center
4/15/10, 4/17/10, 4/18/10

Portland, ME
Patriot Cinemas: Nickelodeon Cinema
4/15/10, 4/18/10

Ft. Lauderdale, FL
Cinema Paradiso
4/16/10

Newport, RI
Jane Pickens Theatre
4/16/10

St. Pete's Beach, FL
Beach Theatre
4/16/10

Deland, FL.
Athens Theatre
4/16/10, 4/17/10

Washington, D.C.
Atlas Performing Arts Center
4/16/10, 4/19/10

Lake Worth, FL
Lake Worth Playhouse
4/17/10

Key West, FL
Tropic Cinema
4/17/10

Shreveport, LA
Robinson Film Center
4/17/10

Wellfleet, MA
Wellfleet Harbor Actor's Theatre
4/18/10

Bellingham, WA
Pickford Film Center
4/19/10

Cleveland, OH
Cedar Lee Theatre
4/20/10

Three Rivers, MI
Riviera Theatre
4/20/10

Oberlin, OH
Apollo Theatre
4/20/10

Telluride, CO
Michael D. Palm Theatre
4/20/10

Palm Beach, FL
Mos' Art Theater
DATE TBD

DSO News & Spring 2010 Tour Dates

Gratefulfest Artist Additions

Nelsons Ledges has just announced a great lineup of artists joining us for 4th of July weekend. There will be 2 special performances by Keller Williams. One is Keller & the Keels do Deadgrass & more plus a Keller solo dance set! There will also be sets from: New Riders of the Purple Sage, Peter Rowan's Bluegrass Band, JGB, Emmitt-Nershi Band, Moonalice, Steve Kimock Crazy Engine, Jemimah Puddleduck, Donna Jean Godchaux Band, Boombox, David Gans, DJ Harry, Rumor Has It and Ekoostik Hookah projects- Katz & Jammers and The Spikedrivers.

These bands will join us as we play three nights during the weekend of July 2-5. Visit NLQP.com for more details.

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One Way Or Another...

April brings the band back to the mountains for another great run out west. The tour begins with stops in Aspen and Avon before holding down the Boulder Theater for Friday and Saturday night. From there its off to Northern California for two nights at the Mystic Theater before heading to the northwest for shows in Portland, Seattle, Olympia and Ashland. 4/20 finds the band back in CA at the Eureka Theater. Then its off to Reno before swinging into San Fran for a weekend at the Regency Ballroom. The last leg of the tour winds south through California stopping off in Modesto, Los Angeles, Santa Ana before wrapping up with 2 nights at the Belly Up in Solona Beach.

Our friend Stu Allen will be joining us for this tour starting April 7th. A native of Louisville, Kentucky, Stu joined Melvin Seals & JGB in June 2004 and appears on the 'Keepers of the Flame' album. In the early 1990's, he co-founded the Minnesota-based acoustic-electric jam band, Blue Man Jive. In addition, he is a founding member of The Jones Gang, Minneapolis' premier Grateful Dead tribute band, to which he still lends his talents. A resident of San Francisco, Stu continues to explore, experiment, create, and recreate, within a variety of musical styles. He can't wait to join us on the road and come and play for you folks.

Ticket info and more details available on our Tour Dates Page.

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Summer's Here and the Time is Right...

The first leg of our summer tour is locked in and we are excited to share our plans with you. Kicking off in Minnesota and cruising through the mid-west with stops in Iowa and Illinois before hitting Summerfest for the annual street fest where there will be plenty of dancin' in the streets. From there we head to our annual celebration at Nelson's Ledges where we will celebrate 4th of July weekend (July 2-3-4) with Gratefulfest 11 and will be joined by Keller Williams, New Riders of the Purple Sage, Peter Rowan's Bluegrass Band, JGB, Emmit-Nershi Band and more! Follow that up with a headlining spot at All Good's Thursday Throwdown and a return to the annual Gathering of the Vibes. Summer is looking pretty sweet.

Visit our Tour Dates Page for more info.

Umphrey's McGee & Galactic Present: Red Rocks & Blue July 4th Weekend

Celebrate Independence Day Weekend with Umphrey's McGee and Galactic’s Red Rocks & Blue extravaganza on Saturday, July 3rd in Colorado. We'll join forces atRed Rocks Amphitheatre for a long night of music with a heavy dose of reggae classics from the The Wailers. Galactic will be joined special guest Cyril Neville (of the Neville Brothers Band). Look for more exciting info in the coming weeks in addition to the many surprises planned for the show. In addition to the Red Rocks & Blue main course, both bands will perform intimate shows at theGothic Theatre, with Galactic on Friday, July 2nd and Umphrey’s McGee on Sunday, July 4th.

Umphrey's McGee & Galactic want you to celebrate your freedom of choice. Here's your chance to vote for a song that BOTH bands will play together at their July 3rd Red Rocks show. That's right, both Umphrey's McGee and Galactic will collaborate to play the winning song from the choices below. So exercise your rights, vote today, and join us in Colorado July 2-4 for Red Rocks & Blue! Forward this on to anyone you know who loves freedom and live music.

This will be a 4th of July weekend that is really a reason to celebrate your freedom. This is the first time that Umphrey's McGee will close the show under the stars at Red Rocks. We have a chance to be a part of history, so let's sell out Red Rocks! Pre-sale packages for the Red Rocks/Gothic Theatre shows will begin this Saturday, March 20th at NOON MT via UM TIcketing. Pre-sale includes discounted 2 and 3 day packages, and VIP tickets. Public on-sale begins Saturday, March 27th at 10 AM MT. Stay tuned for more exciting additions and announcements surrounding Red Rocks & Blue. We hope to see you in Colorado.Go here for more info!

Norah Jones & Chick Corea at Gent Jazz Festival

The Gent Jazz Festival (07.07-18.07.2010) announces the first names for the 2010 edition: Norah Jones, Daniel Lanois Black Dub feat. Trixie Whitley & Brian Blade, Joe Bonamassa, Chick Corea Freedom band, Vijay Iyer Trio, De Beren Gieren and a homage to Django Reinhardt.

The Gent Jazz Festival begins on July 7 this year with a Special Night featuring none other than Norah Jones. The American singer presents her last album The Fall. Further that day also De Beren Gieren as the winners of the Young Jazz Talent Ghent competition 2009 and DjanGo! 100 Years Django Reinhardt A Tribute by De Cauter Family who will also release an album on the Belgian W.E.R.F.-Label soon.

Friday July 9 Chick Corea is the main act with his Freedom Band with besides Chick Corea himself also Kenny Garret, Christain McBride and Roy Haynes. Earlier that day also piano talent Vijay Iyer with his Trio.

On the last day of the festival, July 18, we find blues wonder Joe Bonamassa on the programme and Daniel Lanois with his Black Dub project is the closing act of the festival together with Trixie Whitley & Brian Blade.

Info & tickets:www.gentjazz.com

Tickets cost 29 euros per evening (excl. booking costs), except for those of July 7 (concert day with Norah Jones) which cost 42 euros (excl. booking costs). A Three-Day Pass costs 73 euros (excl. booking costs). Tickets are available as of today. Tickets can be booked via www.gentjazz.com, or at FNAC. Just as last year, the last festival weekend coincides with the opening weekend of the Ghent Festivities.

EOTO Announces July & August Dates

hannThe left coast breakbeat, glitch-hop and house duo known as EOTO is set to play nine momentous shows through the end of August, on top of their already jam-packed festival schedule. Since the new year rolled around, EOTO has toured relentlessly, playing more than 100 shows and making a name for themselves as pioneers of a new sound, an innovative blend of live instrumentation and digital mixing. The duo descends on Denver on July 16 for Thunk: A Live Art Exhibition at Cervantes Masterpiece Ballroom, before heading northeast to Pennsylvania. Then it's back across country to Idaho, Washington and up into Canada, before coming back through Colorado, Utah and ultimately, Missouri.

Featuring Jason Hann and Michael Travis, formerly of the progressive jam outfit The String Cheese Incident, EOTO is a shot of adrenaline to the heart of the music industry. Differing in sonic stature from their mixing forefathers, the typical EOTO live experience is 100% atypical, meaning nothing is pre-recorded, nothing is pre-looped and no set is pre-planned. Every night is a distinctive journey into the musical minds of Hann and Travis, each feeding off of the other’s creativity and the audience’s vibes. EOTO combines cutting-edge technology with live instrumental performance to create truly original and melodic dance music in the moment.

No group on the circuit tours as hard as EOTO and nothing has changed for the foreseeable future, save a few festival dates in exchange for the night-after-night venue spots they have played so far in 2009. Hann and Travis have been from west to east and everywhere in between in just seven months and are primed to play at least 35 shows between now and the end of September. It will be a nice break for the two to venture back indoors for July and August dates, where the bone-quaking and mind-rippling beats they create spontaneously are well at home. By the time they reach Missouri, EOTO will have more than proven they are big enough and calculated enough for the wide open spaces of the festival tour, but refined enough for the Theater.

For a complete list of tour dates and for more information, please click here.

The Fabulous Thunderbirds play Colorado Springs, July 24

For over thirty years, The Fabulous Thunderbirds have been the quintessential American band. The group's distinctive and powerful sound, influenced by a diversity of musical styles, manifested itself into a unique musical hybrid via such barnburners as “Tuff Enuff” and “Wrap It Up.”

thunderbirdsFounding member Kim Wilson spearheads the group as it evolves into its newest incarnation. “We started as a straight blues band.” vocalist and harmonica player Wilson says. “We now incorporate a mixture of a lot of different styles. We're an American music band and we're higher energy than ever before.” The Fabulous Thunderbirds features Jay Moeller on drums, Johnny Moeller and Mike Keller on guitar, and Randy Bermudes on bass.

Wilson’s musical talents have garnered him multiple Blues Awards and Grammy Nominations. The Blues Foundation 2008 blues Music Awards named Wilson "Instrumentalist - Harmonica" category.  In 2006, he was named “Contemporary Blues Male Artist of the Year” in 2006, and “Lookin’ for Trouble!” was named Blues Song of the Year in 2004. Wilson has contributed to the work of many other great artists such as the legendary Muddy Waters (who called him his “son”), contemporary artist Bonnie Raitt, guitar legends Stevie Ray Vaughn and brother Jimmy Vaughn, and Martin Scorsese’s movie “The Blues." With his current movie project “Cadillac Records,” Wilson continues to focus on the music he loves.

With over 20 albums recorded and millions sold, Kim Wilson and The Fabulous Thunderbirds tour the world performing their own unique style of music. Ranging from pop anthems like “Powerful Stuff” which was featured in the Tom Cruise movie “Cocktail," to the low down blues of "Chicago," this brand of honest music brings fans back time and again.

Having shared the stage with The Rolling Stones, Joe Cocker, Carlos Santana and blues legends BB King and Buddy Guy and countless others, The Fabulous Thunderbirds continue to tour Europe and the North America, bringing more great music to their fans worldwide.

Their new CD (tentative title “Pay Back Time”) is to be released in mid-2009.

National Jazz Museum in Harlem July Schedule

The National Jazz Museum in Harlem’s July programming covers the gamut, with programs showcasing all generations, from musical harmony to discussion and debate.

Two veterans of jazz grace the interview chair for Harlem Speaks, the museum’s flagship series: the first, Jon Hendricks, continues a highly entertaining and revealing conversation for archival video and audio capture in front of a live audience; the second, drummer Louis Hayes, will be the focus in conversation about his role as a sideman with several of the greatest soloists in jazz as well as his own direction of startlingly fresh ensembles with youthful players following his lead.

The career of the father of jazz, Louis Armstrong, from the revolutionary ‘20s through the resurgent ‘50s is the focus of Jazz for Curious Listeners. The Kataru jazz trio will bring experimental excursions of multi-layered sonorities to the wonderful all-acoustic venue at the Rubin Museum of Art for Harlem in the Himalayas, as will showcases for young musicians deserving greater recognition: Two Young Tenors and Two Young Pianists.

Author Stephanie Crease will discuss her recently published children’s book on Duke Ellington for Jazz for Curious Readers and will also lead a session with youth in Central Park.

Expect insights and the delights of debate at our monthly Saturday panel, as a group of scholars, journalists and musicians discuss the role of the critic in jazz, as help or perhaps as hindrance to the objective of increasing the audience of listeners and consumers of jazz music.

 
Monday, July 6, 2009

Jazz for Curious Readers
Stephanie Crease
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Tonight's program focuses on Stephanie Crease's book, Duke Ellington; His Life in Jazz.

Stephanie Stein Crease is the author of Gil Evans: Out of the Cool, a winner of the ASCAP-Deems Taylor Award, and Duke Ellington: His Life in Jazz. She is a music journalist who has contributed to the New York Times, Down Beat, JAZZIZ, Pulse, and The Oxford Companion to Jazz.

Her large-format book combines an illustrated biography of Duke Ellington with activities designed to offer insights into Ellington’s era and his music. The main text presents Ellington’s life in a straightforward account, concentrating on his career as a jazz musician, composer, and band leader. Meanwhile, the many sidebars discuss related topics such as turn-of-the-twentieth-century music technology (piano rolls and phonographs) and the U.S. State Department’s “jazz ambassadors” program during the Cold War. Appearing throughout the book, the activities mentioned in the subtitle vary from “Learn to Read Drum Notation” to “Make Corn Bread for a Rent Party” to “Write Lyrics to an Ellington Tune.” The many black-and-white excellent photos show up well on the glossy pages. Appendixes include bibliographies and lists of recommended recordings, films, and Web sites.  

Tuesday, July 7, 2009

Jazz for Curious Listeners
Louis Armstrong: Fireworks: The '20s
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

The Wonderful World of Louis Armstrong – The ‘20s

Despite his battles with poverty and his struggles as a musician in New Orleans, Louis Armstrong spoke highly of his hometown's diversity and vitality, particularly appreciating the wide variety of music—from ragtime and blues to opera and church music—that permeated the streets. Still, Armstrong began to travel, playing with Fate Marable's riverboat band. During his two-year tenure cruising the Mississippi River Armstrong refined his ability to read music and reproduce songs requested of him.

King Oliver, Armstrong’s mentor in New Orleans, left town at this point a well-known and prolific musician in Chicago, and decided he wanted to add a second cornetist to his Creole Jazz Band. Until Armstrong eventually paved the way for the soloist, jazz music had emphasized the importance of the group as a whole, where each musician must fulfill a particular role.

But when Oliver requested Armstrong to join his band at Lincoln Gardens in 1922, Armstrong did not hesitate. "I felt it was a great break for me," Armstrong wrote in his 1954 autobiography Satchmo, "even to sit beside a man like Joe Oliver with all his prestige."

Indeed, Oliver provided Armstrong with a sterling mentorship and through his work with the Creole Jazz Band, Armstrong further honed his sense of harmony, developed his ear, and made his first recordings with the band at the Gennett Studios in Richmond, Indiana. However, Armstrong, an innovative musical genius, quickly exhibited his superiority over the other band members.

By now, the Creole Jazz Band's pianist Lil Hardin had become Armstrong's second wife, and she pressured Armstrong to leave the band and join Fletcher Henderson's Orchestra at the Roseland Ballroom in New York. Although he had to accept a pay cut to join Henderson, Armstrong seized the opportunity to play with such a well-known band.

During his period with Henderson's Orchestra, Armstrong's name became synonymous with the finest new 'hot' music of the day. His innovative use of syncopation, particularly in songs like "Shanghai Shuffle," had never been heard before. He also recorded with many blues singers, including Clara Smith and Trixie Smith, and his recording of "St. Louis Blues" with Bessie Smith had become a huge success.

In 1925, Armstrong returned to Chicago, switched from the cornet to the trumpet, and recorded the first album as leader of his own band, the Hot Five. The recordings Armstrong made with the Hot Five and its successor, the Hot Seven, at Okeh Records were—and still remain—some of the most influential jazz recordings in history. With Armstrong's masterful technique, pieces like "Cornet Chop Suey," "Potato Head Blues," and "West End Blues" helped give rise to the solo as the centerpiece in jazz music.

The original Hot Five included Johnny Dodds on clarinet, Kid Ory on trombone, Johnny St. Cyr on banjo, Lil Hardin on piano, and of course Armstrong on cornet. Eventually Lil was replaced with Earl "Fatha" Hines on piano and—with the addition of Pete Briggs on tuba and Baby Dodds on drums—the Hot Seven emerged. Neither the Hot Five nor the Hot Seven played live, but they recorded their extraordinary music for three years.

Not only did the Hot Five and Hot Seven recordings significantly influence all jazz instrumental music that would succeed them, but vocal music was also affected. In the 1926 recording of “Heebie Jeebies,” Armstrong sang but he did not use any words, a style popular in the New Orleans of his youth. Using vowels and consonants, Armstrong popularized a vocal style that became known as scat singing.

Meanwhile, Armstrong's source of income came from performances with his wife's band at the Dreamland Café and with the Carroll Dickerson Orchestra at the Sunset Café. While at the Sunset Café, he met his future manager Joe Glaser, an ex-convict who had ties to the Al Capone mob.

Armstrong moved to New York in 1929, and as hired to play in the orchestra of the Broadway musical Hot Chocolates, the creation of Fats Waller and Andy Razaf. The musical was well-received, and Armstrong's active participation in the theatrical arts had begun.

By the late 1920's, phonograph records started to replace sheet music, and many audiences worldwide could hear the music of Louis Armstrong. His 1929 recording of "Ain't Misbehavin" became his top selling record to date.

Thursday, July 9, 2009

Harlem Speaks
Jon Hendricks, Vocalist (Part 2)
6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

In the first of our two-part exploration into the life and art of legendary vocalist and vocalese master Jon Hendricks, he discussed aspects of his early life in Toledo, Ohio, where he sang for change, rehearsed with Art Tatum, and watched Fats Waller steal a swig of alcohol as Hendricks’ father, a Christian minister, looked away. Hendricks also recalled memories of the personality and musical genius of Charlie Parker and Theolonious Monk; about the latter, Hendricks shared intimate and hilarious details of his collaboration as Monk’s lyricist. The early days of Lambert, Hendricks and Ross was also a topic of inquiry and conversation.
 
Part 2 promises to go even deeper into the mind and heart of long-time NEA Master Jon Hendricks, so come early and ready for swingin’ conversation!
 

Friday, July 10, 2009

Harlem in the Himalayas
Jazz Festival: Two Young Tenors
7:00pm
Location: Rubin Museum of Art
(150 West 17th Street)
$18 in advance | $20 at door |
Box Office: 212-620-5000 ext. 344

Musicians you SHOULD know about!
 
There have always been a tremendous amount of wonderful jazz players who arrive in New York to attain the seasoning needed to distinguish themselves in the leading rank of musicians. Meet two of them this evening that are ready for major careers:
 
Tom Gardner and our surprise special guest have equally original and contrasting styles on the tenor sax. Check out this musical debate that will be one of the memorable jazz evenings of this summer.

Saturday, July 11, 2009

Special Event
110 on 110: A Clearing in the Forest
1:00 – 2:00pm
Location: Children's Glade
(inside Central Park from West 103rd St. to West 106th St.)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

With author Stephanie Crease

If you have children for whom you’d like to spark or nurture an interest in jazz, we invite you to bring them to an event based on Stephanie Crease’s book Duke Ellington: A Life in Music with 21 Activities. There will be activities for all children to participate in. This will be a memorable afternoon for kids and parents for sure. They’ll all leave with the following equation: JAZZ=FUN!
 
Tuesday, July 14, 2009

Jazz for Curious Listeners
Louis Armstrong: Swing That Music: The '30s
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

The Wonderful World of Louis Armstrong – The ‘30s

Between 1930 and 1934, Armstrong separated from Lil Hardin, hired Johnny Collins as his manager, and moved back and forth between Los Angeles, Chicago, and Paris. Around this time, many nightclubs were connected to the mob, and it was difficult for Armstrong to avoid interactions with gangsters. When Armstrong refused to return to Connie's Inn, thugs followed Armstrong and his musicians around the streets of New York, and Armstrong was forced to extend tours across the country and in England.

Armstrong briefly led the Sebastian New Cotton Club Orchestra in California, then toured throughout the United States and Europe. Eventually, Armstrong's nickname Satchmo (short for satchel mouth) became known around the world.

When Armstrong returned to the United States in 1935, he hired the Joe Glaser to be his manager and the Luis Russell Orchestra to be his backup band. Consisting of mainly New Orleans musicians, the Orchestra provided a very comfortable setting for Armstrong, and together they became known as Louis Armstrong and his Orchestra. In 1936, Armstrong recorded "Swing That Music," a song that was famous for the trumpeter's ability to hit forty-two high C's followed by a high E-flat. Later that year, Armstrong's autobiography Swing That Music was published.

In 1937, Armstrong hosted the Fleischmann's Yeast Show, a national network radio program, and a year later, he divorced Lil Hardin and married Alpha Smith shortly thereafter. His marriage to Alpha lasted three years, and in 1942 Armstrong married for the fourth time—his time to Lucille Wilson, who would remain his wife for the rest of his life.

Thursday, July 17, 2009

Harlem in the Himalayas
Jazz Festival: Kataru
7:00pm
Location: Rubin Museum of Art
(150 West 17th Street)
$18 in advance | $20 at door |
Box Office: 212-620-5000 ext. 344

Musicians you SHOULD know about!

Kaoru Watanabe
Tatsuya Nakatani
Adam Rudolph
 
KATARU, meaning “to speak” in Japanese, is a trio made up of Kaoru Watanabe on Japanese and Western flutes and taiko drums, Adam Rudolph on Handrumset and percussion and Tatsuya Nakatani on modified drumset , bowed gongs and percussion - three musicians of disparate musical backgrounds who, by seamlessly integrating abstracted Japanese Noh, Gagaku, festival and folk music components with traditional global percussion, free jazz and noise elements create ever shifting emotional soundscapes.  The spontaneity, delicacy and visceral intensity of the trio seeks to reflect, in a contemporary aesthetic, an ancient prototypical human expression.
 

Tuesday, July 21, 2009

Jazz for Curious Listeners
Louis Armstrong: Gone Fishin': The '40s
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

The Wonderful World of Louis Armstrong – The ‘40s  -- By the 1940's, swing bands were losing their popularity and Armstrong was growing tired of leading a large group. In 1947, promoter Ernie Anderson introduced Armstrong to a small band, featuring Jack Teagarden on trombone, Earl 'Fatha' Hines on piano, Arvell Shaw on bass, and Velma Middleton on vocals. These musicians—with various changes including the addition of Barney Bigard on clarinet, 'Big' Sid Catlett on drums, and Trummy Young on trombone—formed the Louis Armstrong All Stars, which became one of the most well-known jazz outfits in history.

Armstrong's All Stars performed relentlessly all over the world in clubs, festivals, and concert halls. No matter where they performed, they were followed by admiring audiences. Armstrong made appearances at the Nice Jazz Festival, the first international jazz festival, and in Africa, where he was greeted and hailed by thousands.

An international celebrity, Armstrong's music and face began appearing everywhere. He was pictured on the cover of Time magazine on February 21, 1949. He made appearances in the musical High Society and on television shows such as Johnny Carson's Tonight Show and the Ed Sullivan Show. He collaborated with the Oscar Peterson Trio and with singers Bing Crosby, Louis Jordan, and Ella Fitzgerald.

Friday, July 24, 2009

Harlem in the Himalayas
Jazz Festival: Two Young Pianists
7:00pm
Location: Rubin Museum of Art
(150 West 17th Street)
$18 in advance | $20 at door |
Box Office: 212-620-5000 ext. 344

Musicians you SHOULD know about!

There have always been a tremendous amount of wonderful jazz players who arrive in New York to attain the seasoning needed to distinguish themselves in the leading rank of musicians. Meet two of them this evening that are ready for major careers:

Kris Bowers and Brandon McCune pair off on a beautiful Yahama concert grand. Come watch the sparks fly.

Satruday, July 25, 2009

Saturday Panels
The Pen is Mightier Than The Sword
10:00am – 4:00pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Jazz Journalists in Conversation with Musicians/Writers

Moderator: Greg Thomas
 
Panelists to include: Gary Giddins, Steve Coleman

At the 2009 Jazz Journalists Association Award ceremony many musicians thanked the writers and critics present for connecting their work for and to a larger public. While the music and the musicians who play it are the best exemplars of the art form in action, jazz journalists play a key role in the mass and niche media by way of bridging the art and artists with consumers and listeners.

But in light of the downfall of Jazz Times, the cancellation of the major New York jazz festival, and, several years ago, the dissolution of the International Association of Jazz Educators, the state of jazz as a viable institutional force has been called into question.

However, jazz musicians and jazz journalists have confronted, decade after decade, the notion that jazz is on a death knell, while the number of students studying jazz in college continues to rise. Do journalists and musicians see eye-to-eye on a vision of a jazz future? What role does race and cultural background play into the often contentious discourse between and among musicians and journalists and critics?

These questions are just two of the many topics to be pursued in this Saturday panel. The present state of jazz journalism and the music will of course be discussed also.

To place the discussion in a historical context, scholar John Gennari, author of Blowing Hot and Cold: Jazz and its Critics, will provide a narrative of the key issues and questions that have arisen in jazz criticism.

Jazz Journalists Association president Howard Mandel, author of Miles Ornette Cecil: Jazz Beyond Jazz, is another panel guest.

Gary Giddins, considered by many the premier jazz critic in the nation, will also participate.

Steve Coleman, alto saxophnist, composer and band leader, is critical of aspects of jazz criticism and will bring his unique perspective to the discussion.

Several other jazz journalists and musicians of note are expected to confirm shortly. (Visit our website for updates.)
 

Tuesday, July 28, 2009

Jazz for Curious Listeners
Louis Armstrong: La Vie En Rose: The '50s
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

The Wonderful World of Louis Armstrong – The 50s and beyond

The 50’s saw many Armstrong create many of his greatest masterpieces, from the recordings with Ella Fitzgerald to the W.C. Handy and Fats Waller tributes, to the films including High Society, and the musical autobiography done for Decca Records, where he revisited many of his earlier classics, creating updates that were anything but inferior to the originals. As for social issues, contrary to what his critics believed, Armstrong was deeply incensed by racial discrimination and often voiced his disapproval. Even though his popularity had spread across the world, Armstrong was not excluded from the racism and prejudices that were pervasive during his career. He felt alienated even in his hometown New Orleans, where he refused to visit because the Jim Crow laws were still being exercised after they were ruled illegal. "I don't care if I ever see that city again," Armstrong said. "They treat me better all over the world than they do in my hometown. Ain't that stupid? Jazz was born there and I remember when it wasn't no crime for cats of any color to get together and blow."

Not only was Armstrong the first prominent African-American celebrity of international acclaim, but he was the first jazz musician to tour Africa extensively and one of the first musicians to play for integrated audiences. In 1957, Armstrong cancelled his tour in Russia to speak out against President Eisenhower and the way desegregation was handled in a school in Little Rock, Arkansas. He then congratulated the President when the policy was reversed.  

Thursday, July 30, 2009

Harlem Speaks
Louis Hayes, Drummer
6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

For more than forty years, drummer Louis Hayes has been a catalyst for energetic, unrelenting swing in his self led bands, as well as in those whose respective leaders reads like an encyclopedia of straight ahead post-bop modern jazz. Hayes, himself an authentic architect of post-bop swing, began his professional activities in 1955 at the tender age of 18. He started with tenor saxophonist, flautist and oboist Yusef Lateef, who like Hayes is a Detroit native. After the stint with Lateef, Hayes went on to propel groups led by pianist Horace Silver, legendary saxophonist Cannonball Adderley and pianist Oscar Peterson. These positions were augmented by countless recordings on the Blue Note, Prestige, Riverside and other labels with John Coltrane, Sonny Rollins, J.J. Johnson, Jackie McLean, Wes Montgomery, Cedar Walton, Dexter Gordon, Woody Shaw, George Benson, Freddie Hubbard, Joe Henderson, McCoy Tyner, and a plethora of others.

For the last twenty-plus years, Louis has led or co-led some of the most uncompromisingly swinging groups in all of jazz. Each unit has displayed tight-knit harmonic cohesion and hard-driving consistency as part of its signature.

With so much activity in his past, Louis could easily rest comfortably on his laurels. But being a forward thinker and doer, Hayes operates “in the present.” His recent groups contain some of the cream of the young jazz crop. Saxophonist Javon Jackson and Abraham Burton, young trumpeter Riley Mullins and other stellar players are among current members of the Louis Hayes Quintet. Louis Hayes possesses an embarrassment of riches. His story, still being told, contains a glorious past, a vibrant present and an ever promising future, all of which he'll discuss at this, the closing event of the month of July for the National Jazz Museum in Harlem.