york

Teddy Charles Quartet at KItano | NYC

Teddy Charles is considered to be one of the great jazz vibraphonists and composers of all time, playing with such jazz legends as Charles Mingus, Charlie Parker and Miles Davis. As a student at Julliard in the mid 40s, he haunted New York's jazz clubs, occasionally sitting in with the bands on vibes or piano. His break came unexpectedly one night when he was asked to sit in on piano with Coleman Hawkin's band for the overdue Thelonious Monk. Soon after, Charles began to appear regularly with the top jazz groups of the day, Artie Shaw, Benny Goodman, Buddy De Franco, playing alongside and writing for such jazz stars as Coltrane, Parker, Max Roach and Miles Davis. Recently appeared with Max Roach, David Amram, Lee Konitz. In the early 1950s he began leading his own groups, composing, producing and recording original works such as No More Nights, Blues Become Elektra and Word from Bird.

TEDDY CHARLES QUARTET

FRI. & SAT. APRIL 23 & 24 SETS 8:00 PM & 10:00 PM

THE KITANO | NEW YORK
66 Park Avenue @ 38th St.
RESERVATIONS - 212-885-7119
VISIT OUR TWEETS AT: http://twitter.com/kitanonewyork
http://kitano.com/ email: jazz@kitano.com

Adam Green: Debut Art Exhibition 'Teen Tech' At New York's Morrison Hotel

Folk-rock troubadour Adam Green's debut art show, Teen Tech, will open at the Morrison Hotel Gallery Bowery (313 Bowery, former home to the famed CBGB's gallery) in his hometown of New York, NY, on April 22nd. Following a private opening night party, the exhibition will be available to the public April 23rd and 24th. Teen Tech showcases another artistic side of singer/songwriter Green, already known for his prolific (six albums in eight years) career as a solo musician and for his work as half of the band Moldy Peaches. Last year, he composed the soundtrack for a German theatrical adaptation of Paul Auster's novel Timbuktu, which he titled Musik For A Play. Fat Possum Records released Green's most recent solo album, Minor Love, in February.

The exhibition will consist of original works by Green: 12 sculptures of plaster, papier-mâché, or papier-mâché and mixed materials; 18 large-scale (30" x 40") acrylic or watercolor paintings; 19 drawings; and 20 collages (created together with model Cory Kennedy). The art will be for sale and a portion of the proceeds will be donated to the charitable organization Artists for Peace and Justice, which directs 100% of all funds raised towards rebuilding and maintaining long-term sustainability in Haiti. Friend and peer Binki Shapiro of Little Joy introduced Green to the organization when he donated a hand-designed t-shirt for her recent, highly successful Crafts For A Cause online auction that donated all proceeds to Artists for Peace and Justice. Green and Shapiro decided to work together again here in an effort to continue giving. Following the show's close, any remaining pieces will be available here.

Green says of the exhibition, "Teen Tech is an art show I've prepared over the last year and a half. Perhaps because I'm an entertainer in showbiz, I found myself trying to make this art show more entertaining than average. It focuses on cartoon subjects. I don't often read comics but I've always liked to draw cartoons. I contend that all artists work in caricature. The pieces in Teen Tech are caricatures of cartoons, which I feel distill the subjects down to their bare essence."


Teen Tech coincides with Green's two-night, hometown headlining stand at the Bowery Ballroom. These two gigs, April 23rd and 24th, will be the final of his current U.S. tour in support of Minor Love. The album has earned Green plenty of praise, with BlackBook writing, "...the real genius of Minor Love isn't the album's embrace of disparate genres (although that's impressive, too), it's how charming and easy Green makes all this variety sound" and Filter adding, "...Green revels in a stripped-down, bittersweet world where nothing lasts forever, with both his baritone and lyrics adding freshness to his fatalist outlook." Remaining tour dates are below.


Adam Green tour dates:

APR. 13 DENVER, CO LARIMER LOUNGE

APR. 14 KANSAS CITY, MO RECORD BAR

APR. 15 CHICAGO, IL SCHUBAS

APR. 16 CLEVELAND, OH GROG SHOP (early show)

APR. 17 TORONTO, ONT MOD CLUB

APR. 19 MONTREAL, QUE PETIT CAMPUS

APR. 20 BOSTON, MA GREAT SCOTT

APR. 21 PHILADELPHIA, PA JOHNNY BRENDA'S

APR. 23 NEW YORK, NY BOWERY BALLROOM

APR. 24 NEW YORK, NY BOWERY BALLROOM

The Morning Pages Cover Lady Gaga

Brooklyn’s six-piece root-rockers The Morning Pages have just recorded an alt-country take on Lady Gaga’s "Telephone" along with a grainy lo-fi stock photography-esque video complete with slide guitars, cowboy hats and tin cans on strings, answering the question "How would "Telephone" play out in the 1850s?".  The ubiquitous song caught the attention of lead singer Grant Maxwell who decided to cover the song because "a great song is a great song and indie music doesn't have to be all dissonant and obscure and depressing all the time and on the other hand pop music could stand to sound a lot more organic and musical. My thought was they maybe we could combine the depth of roots music with the visceral enjoyment and popular appeal of mainstream music and get the next revolution started....also, I just couldn't get that song out of my head!" You can watch the new video HERE on YouTube.

With their 2007 EP The Company You Keep, The Morning Pages immediately stood out from other Brooklyn acts by tracing their roots back to country and folk influences such as Willie Nelson, Gram Parsons, Waylon Jennings, and The Band. It was this EP that caught the attention of Russell Simins of the Jon Spencer Blues Explosion who went on to produce their upcoming debut full length Rising Rain.

The album’s standouts include joyous foot-stompers like “With The Lord,” “Move To The Country” and “This City Keeps Me Down,” as well as plaintive ballads like the album’s first single “My Name Is Lion.”

The Morning Pages New York Dates:
April 9th – Brooklyn, NY @ Spike Hill
May 6th – Brooklyn, NY @ Cameo
May 20th – New York, NY @ Rockwood Music Hall
May 27th – New York, NY @ Bowery Ballroom (Dylan Fest 2010)

Beat Kaestli at Birdland on April 29th

Beat Kaestli is a vocalist, songwriter and producer residing in New York City. After establishing himself in the Swiss music scene, he moved to New York to broaden his musical horizon, leaving behind a promising career in his homeland. He was awarded a scholarship to the Manhattan School of Music (BM) and received the Ella Fitzgerald Foundation scholarship to graduate in 2008 with a Masters Degree from the Aaron Copland School of Music (MA). While honing his craft alongside noteworthy Jazz performers, such as Jane Monheit, Jason Moran and Stefon Harris, he immersed himself in Manhattan's fiercely competitive music scene, emerging as a seasoned performer. He now appears in clubs such as The Blue Note, Birdland, The Bitter End, The Jazz Standard, The Stone aCd Sweet Rhythm, performing with Jazz greats, like Esperanza Spalding, Jon Hendricks, Clarence Penn, Gregoire Maret, Joel Frahm , Billy Drummond, Magos Herrera and Victor Prieto. In 2005, Beat was the chosen vocalist for the Glenn Miller Orchestra, thrilling audiences in concert halls across the USA. Kaestli is touring the world extensively with his own projects, showcasing his music in renowned clubs and at festivals across the US, Europe, Mexico and Canada. His new CD "Far From Home - A Tribute to European Song" was released in fall 2009 in the USA and is scheduled to be released fall 2010 with in Europe.

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Chesky Records Debut "INVITATION" - Release Show BIRDLAND NEW YORK
Thursday, April 29th, 6PM (one set only!)
315 W 44th street (8/9th Ave)
New York, NY
(212) 581 3080 - www.birdlandjazz.com
$20
(includes a complementary CD of the new release "Invitation")
Directions: A, C, E to 42nd street
featuring:
Beat Kaestli - voice
John Hart - guitar
Kenny Rampton - trumpet
Jay Leonhart - bass
Fred Kennedy - drums
and special guest (tba)

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Bar Next Door - Vocal Series:
Monday, April 19th, 8:30/10:30pm
129 MacDougal Street
New York, NY 10012
(212) 529-5945
www.lalanternacaffe.com
$12 plus 1 drink min.
Directions: A, B, C, D, E and F trains to W4th street
featuring:
Beat Kaestli - voice
Guilherme Monteiro - guitar
Gary Wang - bass
special guest Sean Nowell - sax
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Chris' Jazz Cafe
Wednesday, April 21stSet times 8 / 9:45PM
1421 Sansom Street
Philadelphia, PA 19102-3004
(215) 568-3131 - www.chrisjazzcafe.com
$10, $5 for students

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Upcoming shows in USA/Europe/Mexico:

March 31st - Bix Jazz Club, Stuttgart, Germany
April 8th - Brooklyn Library, NYC
April 19th - Bar Next Door, NYC
April 21st - Chris' Jazz Cafe, Philadelphia
April 25th - Interview with David Kenny WBAI, NYC
April 29th - BIRDLAND, NYC - CHESKY RECORDS RELEASE SHOW
May 2nd - San Luis Festival, Mexico
May - Zinco Jazz Club, Mexico City
May 16th - Talent and Voices at CENART, Mexico City
May - Puebla International Jazzfestival, Mexico (tbc)
May 24th - Zinc Bar, NYC
Oct 2nd-5th - Generations Festival Frauenfeld, Switzerland
Oct 6th - Jazzfreunde Interlaken, Switzerland
Oct 7th - Gambrinus, St Gallen, Switzerland
Oct 8th - Italy (tbc)
Oct 11th - "Shared Night" w/ Alexa Rodrian & Elisabeth Rodrian, B-Flat, Berlin (tbc)
Oct 13th - Le Pirate, Rosenheim, Germany
Oct 15th - Birdland, Ettlingen w/Elisabeth Lohninger, Germany
Oct 27th - The Kitano Hotel, NYC (tbc)
April 15th 2011 - Nicolai Saal, Potsdam, Germany

Ane Brun- Releases 4 Albums, Opens for Peter Gabriel

Norwegian guitarist and vocalist, singer and songwriter Ane Brun returns to the US as part of her US Tour with Peter Gabriel.   Ane will be releasing FOUR beloved albums including: Spending Time with Morgan, Duets, Sketches and Live in Scandanvia.
Ane will be warming the stage for Peter Gabriel across the US along with playing in his band.
On April 27th, Ane will release her currently unavailable in the US catalog via Amazon.com.  These fan faves will be available @ all digital retail outlets on May 5th.
Ane will be the main support in the US for Peter Gabriel on his amazing "New Blood" tour including gigs at:  Radio City Music Hall & the Hollywood Bowl.
Tour Dates:
April 28- Montreal- Bell Centre w/ Peter Gabriel
April 29- Montreal- Bell Centre w/ Peter Gabriel
May 02- New York- Radio City w/ Peter Gabriel
May 03- New York- Radio City w/ Peter Gabriel
May 07- Los Angeles   Hollywood Bowl w/ Peter Gabriel
May 8- Los Angeles- Largo- SOLO
May 10- NYC- Bowery Ballroom- SOLO

Upcoming Beat Kaestli Spring Dates

Beat Kaestli is a vocalist, songwriter and producer residing in New York City. After establishing himself in the Swiss music scene, he moved to New York to broaden his musical horizon, leaving behind a promising career in his homeland. He was awarded a scholarship to the Manhattan School of Music (BM) and received the Ella Fitzgerald Foundation scholarship to graduate in 2008 with a Masters Degree from the Aaron Copland School of Music (MA). While honing his craft alongside noteworthy Jazz performers, such as Jane Monheit, Jason Moran and Stefon Harris, he immersed himself in Manhattan's fiercely competitive music scene, emerging as a seasoned performer. He now appears in clubs such as The Blue Note, Birdland, The Bitter End, The Jazz Standard, The Stone aCd Sweet Rhythm, performing with Jazz greats, like Esperanza Spalding, Jon Hendricks, Clarence Penn, Gregoire Maret, Joel Frahm , Billy Drummond, Magos Herrera and Victor Prieto. In 2005, Beat was the chosen vocalist for the Glenn Miller Orchestra, thrilling audiences in concert halls across the USA. Kaestli is touring the world extensively with his own projects, showcasing his music in renowned clubs and at festivals across the US, Europe, Mexico and Canada. His new CD "Far From Home - A Tribute to European Song" was released in fall 2009 in the USA and is scheduled to be released fall 2010 with NRW Records in Europe.

Tour Dates:

Brooklyn Public Library - "Brooklyn Sings - Brooklyn Swings":
Thursday, April 8th, 7PM

Central Library, Dweck Center
10 Grand Army Plaza
Brooklyn, NY 11238
t. 718-230-2100
FREE
Directions: 2,3.4 and 5 trains to Grand Army Plaza
featuring:
Beat Kaestli - voice
Zach Broch - violin

Ben Stivers - piano
Matt Wigton - bass
Fred Kennedy - drums

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Bar Next Door - Vocal Series:
Monday, April 19th, 8:30/10:30pm

129 MacDougal Street
New York, NY 10012
(212) 529-5945
$12 plus 1 drink min.
Directions: A, B, C, D, E and F trains to W4th street
featuring:
Beat Kaestli - voice
Guilherme Monteiro - guitar
Gary Wang - bass
special guest Sean Nowell - sax

---
Upcoming shows in USA/Europe/Mexico:

Feb 26th - BAM Cafe, Brooklyn, NYC
March 5th - Jazz Club Bamberg, Germany
March 8th - RBB Radio "The Voice", Berlin, Germay http://www.kulturradio.de/frequenzen/index.html
March 8th - "Shared Night Vocal Duos", B-Flat, Berlin, Germany
March 9th - Kulturzentrum Reberhaus Keller, Bolligen, Switzerland
March 10th - Ludwigs w/Jan Eschke, Munich, Germany
March 11th - Cafe Lido w/ Christian Elsaesser, Munich Germany
March 19th - Jazzclub Uster, Switzerland
March 20th - Thalwil w/ Eliane Amherd, Switzerland
March 26th - JazzTone, Loerrach, Germany
March 31st - Bix Jazz Club, Stuttgart, Germany
April 8th - Brooklyn Library, NYC
April 19th - Bar Next Door, NYC
May 2nd - San Luis Festival, Mexico
May 16th - Talent and Voices at CENART, Mexico City
May 24th - Zinc Bar, NYC
Oct 2nd-5th - Generations Festival Frauenfeld, Switzerland
Oct 11th - "Shared Night" w/ Alexa Rodrian & Elisabeth Rodrian, B-Flat, Berlin (tbc)
Oct 13th - Le Pirate, Rosenheim, Germany
Oct 15th - Birdland, Ettlingen w/Elisabeth Lohninger, Germany

National Jazz Museum in Harlem Events, March, 2010

In March 2010, the National Jazz Museum in Harlem presents public programming that brings jazz fans closer to artists—emerging to living masters—that embody the art form that defines America to itself and to the world.

Our live performance series, Harlem in the Himalayas, features three forward-thinking musical leaders grounded in the lessons of their forebears, yet who are only bound by the limits of their imaginations. Come see the boundless future their music beholds at the Rubin Museum of Art.

Come engage in conversation with Terry Teachout, author of a celebrated new bio of Louis Armstrong, at Jazz for Curious Readers, and find out details on the controversial 2009 Wall Street Journal article in which he lamented the declining audience for jazz.


Harlem Speaks, our flagship series, features recent NEA Jazz Master awardee Kenny Barron and trombonist Dick Griffin, whose career encompasses all from mainstream jazz to the avant-garde.

Art Blakey, the drum master who led one of the premier jazz ensembles of the 20th century, is the sole focus of our month long Jazz for Curious Listeners (JCL) series and a special Saturday panel discussion. Museum co-director Christian McBride will lead two of the free JCL sessions, and will spearhead a tribute to Herbie Hancock at Stanford University in California as well.

Come to listen, learn, engage and swing!

Tuesday, March 2, 2010

Jazz for Curious Listeners The Big Beat: Art Blakey
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Art Blakey is undoubtedly one of the most influential and beloved percussionists and band leaders in the history of the music called jazz, his signature rolls and bandstand power accentuating the bandstands of countless groups as a sideman, and as leader of Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers.

The Jazz Messengers was a major incubator for young talent. A list of the band's alumni is a who's who of straight-ahead jazz from the '50s on – Lee Morgan, Wayne Shorter, Freddie Hubbard, Johnny Griffin, Jackie McLean, Donald Byrd, Bobby Timmons, Cedar Walton, Benny Golson, Joanne Brackeen, Billy Harper, Valery Ponomarev, Bill Pierce, Branford Marsalis, James Williams, and Chuck Mangione, to name only a few. In the '80s, precocious graduates of Blakey's School for Swing would continue to number among the movers and shakers in jazz, foremost among them trumpeter Wynton Marsalis, who became the most visible symbol of the '80s jazz mainstream; through him, Blakey's swingin’ ideals came to dominate the public's perception of the music. At the time of Blakey's death in 1990, the Messenger aesthetic dominated jazz, and Blakey himself had arguably become the most influential jazz musician of the past 20 years.

Monday, March 8, 2010

Jazz for Curious ReadersTerry Teachout
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Terry Teachout is a critic, biographer, blogger, and drama critic of The Wall Street Journal, the music critic of Commentary, and the author of Sightings, a column about the arts in America that appears biweekly in the Saturday Wall Street Journal.

And most significantly for tonight, Mr. Teachout is the author of the acclaimed new biography of the Father of Jazz: Pops: A Life of Louis Armstrong.

He blogs at About Last Night along with Chicago-based critic Laura Demanski (who writes under the name "Our Girl in Chicago"), contributes a weekly book-review column and a monthly videoblog to Contentions, the Commentary blog, and has written about the arts for many other magazines and newspapers, including the New York Times and National Review.

Teachout grew up in Sikeston, Missouri. He attended St. John's College in Annapolis, Maryland; William Jewell College in Liberty, Missouri, where he received his B.S. in music journalism; and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He lived in Kansas City from 1975 to 1983, working as a jazz bassist and a music critic for the Kansas City Star. He moved to New York City in 1985, working as an editor at Harper's Magazine (1985-87) and an editorial writer for the New York Daily News (1987-93) and as the News' classical music and dance critic (1993-2000). In 2004 he was appointed by President Bush to the National Council on the Arts, the advisory and review panel of the National Endowment for the Arts.

Teachout is the author of All in the Dances: A Brief Life of George Balanchine (2004, Harcourt), A Terry Teachout Reader (2004, Yale University Press), The Skeptic: A Life of H.L. Mencken (2002, HarperCollins), and City Limits: Memories of a Small-Town Boy (1991, Poseidon Press).

He is the editor of Beyond the Boom: New Voices on American Life, Culture, and Politics (1990, Poseidon, introduction by Tom Wolfe) and Ghosts on the Roof: Selected Journalism of Whittaker Chambers, 1931-1959 (1989, Regnery Gateway). In 1992 he rediscovered the manuscript of A Second Mencken Chrestomathy among H.L. Mencken's private papers and edited it for publication by Alfred A. Knopf (1995). He wrote the forewords to Paul Taylor's Private Domain: An Autobiography (1999, University of Pittsburgh Press), Elaine Dundy's The Dud Avocado (2007, New York Review Books), and William Bailey's William Bailey on Canvas (2007, Betty Cuningham Gallery) and contributed to The Oxford Companion to Jazz (2000, Oxford University Press). He has written liner notes for CDs by Karrin Allyson, Gene Bertoncini, Ruby Braff and Ellis Larkins, Chanticleer, Julia Dollison, Jim Ferguson, Diana Krall, the Lascivious Biddies, Joe Mooney, Marian McPartland, Mike Metheny, Maria Schneider, Nickel Creek, Kendra Shank, Luciana Souza, and the Trio Solisti.

Tuesday, March 9, 2010

Jazz for Curious Listeners The Big Beat: Art Blakey,
THE BANDLEADER
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Art Blakey's first musical education came in the form of piano lessons; he was playing professionally as a seventh grader, leading his own commercial band. He switched to drums shortly thereafter, learning to play in the hard-swinging style of Chick Webb and Sid Catlett. In 1942, he played with pianist Mary Lou Williams in New York. He toured the South with Fletcher Henderson's band in 1943-1944. From there, he briefly led a Boston-based big band before joining Billy Eckstine's new group, with which he would remain from 1944-1947. Eckstine's big band was the famous "cradle of modern jazz," and included (at different times) such major figures of the forthcoming bebop revolution as Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis, and Charlie Parker. When Eckstine's group disbanded, Blakey started a rehearsal ensemble called the Seventeen Messengers. He also recorded with an octet, the first of his bands to be called the Jazz Messengers.

Thursday, March 11, 2010

Harlem Speaks Kenny Barron, Pianist
6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

According to writer Arwulf Arwulf (from whom this bio is adapted), a thorough examination of Kenny Barron's musical accomplishments over a span of 50 years requires a discography of more than 200 pages. That's because in addition to a distinguished career as soloist and leader he has served as one of the most dependable sidemen in all of post-bop mainstream modern jazz. More than 40 albums have appeared under his name, and his presence on literally hundreds of recordings by other musicians paints a panoramic picture of Kenny Barron's lifelong devotion to the music.

Born in Philadelphia, PA, on June 9, 1943, he took on the piano at the age of 12, with a little help from Ray Bryant's sister, known today as the mother of guitarist Kevin Eubanks. Three years later, on the recommendation of his own big brother, saxophonist Bill Barron (1927-1989), he joined Mel Melvin's rhythm & blues band. The aspiring pianist gained more experience while working with drummer Philly Joe Jones, saxophonist Jimmy Heath and multi-instrumentalist Yusef Lateef in Detroit. Lateef's album The Centaur and the Phoenix (1960) was Kenny Barron's first modern jazz recording project, though not as a performer (Joe Zawinul was the pianist on this date) but as composer and arranger.

His recording debut as an improvising artist took place shortly after he moved to New York in 1961 and cut the first of many albums with his brother, who often aligned himself with two graduates of the Charles Mingus Jazz Workshop, trumpeter Ted Curson and saxophonist Booker Ervin. A session in 1962 found Barron working with trumpeter Dave Burns, one-time member of sax and flute man James Moody's exciting bop orchestra. Moody himself played an important role in Barron's career, first hiring him to perform at the Village Vanguard, then bringing him into Dizzy Gillespie's band. Barron stuck with Diz and Moody until 1966, performing at clubs and festivals on both coasts and touring through France and England.

Kenny Barron's first great year of independent recording activity was 1967. In addition to co-leading a band with trumpeter Jimmy Owens, the pianist made records with trumpeter Freddie Hubbard and saxophonists Joe Henderson, Stanley Turrentine, Booker Ervin, and Eric Kloss. Barron seldom recorded with anyone just once. Examples of artists who made many records with Barron during the 1970s are  Moody and Lateef, and bassists Ron Carter and Buster Williams, and others such as Marvin "Hannibal" Peterson. Barron also worked regularly with saxophonists Chico and Von Freeman, John Stubblefield, Nick Brignola, and Stan Getz (with whom he toured extensively during Getz's twilight years). The stylistic range continued to widen as Barron sat in with violinists Michal Urbaniak and John Blake, drummer Elvin Jones, and singing trombonist Ray Anderson.

During the '80s, Kenny Barron played piano in the score for Spike Lee's film Do the Right Thing, appeared on multi-performer tribute albums honoring composers Nino Rota and Thelonious Monk, and became a founding member (with Charlie Rouse, Buster Williams, and Ben Riley) of the definitive Monk legacy band, known as Sphere.

A respected educator who has taught at Rutgers, Juilliard, and the Manhattan School of Music, Kenny Barron continues to create music of exceptionally high quality and substantial depth, something he has done for half a century, whether using the Fender Rhodes electromechanical keyboard, a plugged-in harpsichord, a synthesizer, or his lifelong companion, that fundamental jazz instrument, the piano.

In January 2010 Barron was one of the esteemed recipients of the NEA Jazz Master’s honor, conferring an official recognition of what Barron’s fans have already known for 40 years. Come hear an musical master speak of his life and times in the art of jazz.

Friday, March 12, 2010

Harlem in the Himalayas Jaleel Shaw
7:00pm
Location: Rubin Museum of Art
(150 West 17th Street)
$18 in advance | $20 at door |
Box Office: 212-620-5000 ext. 344

Jaleel Shaw, alto saxophone
Dwayne Burno, acoustic bass
Otis Brown III, drums

One of the most thrilling young alto saxophonists on the jazz scene, Jaleel Shaw holds down the alto chair in the small ensemble of none other than the great Roy Haynes. Tonight see and hear him as he fronts his own band!

Jaleel Shaw grew up in Philadelphia, PA, where he studied with saxophone instructors Rayburn Wright and Robert Landham. As a teen, Jaleel performed, jammed and sat in at the many clubs in Philadelphia, honing his chops and developing strong relationships with the many great musicians there as well as the musicians that came to Philly from New York City.

Upon graduating from high school, Jaleel received a full tuition scholarship to the Berklee College of Music in Boston, Mass, where he attended for four years and earned a dual degree in Music Education and Performance (in 2000). While attending Berklee, Jaleel studied privately with saxophonists Andy Mcghee, Billy Pierce, George Garzone, and Shanon LeClaire.

After graduating from Berklee, Jaleel attended the Manhattan School of Music in New York City, where he received his Masters in Jazz Performance in May 2002. During his time at the MSM, Jaleel was recruited by both the Mingus Big Band and Count Basie Orchestra. Jaleel appears on two Grammy Nominated CDs by the Mingus Big Band - "Tonight at Noon" and "I Am Three."

A year after finishing his graduate studies, Jaleel joined Temple University as a part-time private lesson and ensemble instructor, and soon thereafter began giving private saxophone lessons at The New School.

After being in New York for five years, Jaleel's debut CD "Perspective" was released in June 2005 to rave reviews. It was named one of the top 5 debut CDs of 2005 by All About Jazz and the Jazz Journalists Association. In the fall of 2005, Jaleel joined world renown drummer Roy Haynes' Quartet and recorded the Grammy nominated CD "Whereas" with the group for the Dreyfus Label.

In the beginning of 2008, Jaleel launched his own record label (Changu Records), on which he released his second CD – "Optimism." Today Jaleel continues to perform primarily in three groups - The Roy Haynes Quartet, the Mingus Big Band, and his own quartet and quintet.

Saturday, March 13, 2010

Saturday Panels
Orgy in Rhythm: An In-Depth Look and Listen to Art Blakey
7:30 – 9:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers served as a traveling finishing school for countless jazz musicians who later led their own groups and became composers and arrangers of note. Today, meet some of the alumni of the Messengers, and see film footage of Blakey in action as a drummer, band leader, and teacher.

Tuesday, March 16, 2010
Jazz for Curious Listeners
The Big Beat: Art Blakey
ALUMNI REUNION 7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

With Christian McBride

Christian McBride, co-director of the National Jazz Museum in Harlem, will host alumni of the Blakey band in an evening not to be missed. The spirit of Blakey will be summoned!   

Friday, March 19, 2010

Harlem in the Himalayas
Ambrose Akinmusire
7:00pm
Location: Rubin Museum of Art
(150 West 17th Street)
$18 in advance | $20 at door |
Box Office: 212-620-5000 ext. 344

Ambrose’s conceptual extension into a new musical language never excludes beauty. As one who listens intently, he values the fertility of a pause, of communication, of tension. Ambrose began conceptualizing early as a musician, theorizing and experimenting as a catalyst for development. He seeks other genres of music to analyze and expose, drawing inspiration from musicians ranging from Bjork to Chopin.

Before he was eighteen, Ambrose had already performed with such famed musicians as Joe Henderson, Joshua Redman, Steve Coleman, and Billy Higgins. After graduating Berkeley High School, he moved to New York to begin a scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music, studying with Vincent Pinzerella from the New York Philharmonic, Dick Oatts, Lew Soloff, and Laurie Frink.

Ambrose is a recent graduate of the Masters program at USC, and also the Monk Institute, where Ambrose’s instructors included Terence Blanchard, Billy Childs and Gary Grant. In the past several years, he has worked with such artists as Jimmy Heath, Jason Moran, Hal Crook, Bob Hurst, Terri Lynne Carrington, Ron Carter, and Wallace Roney, Herbie Hancock and Wayne Shorter. So it should come as little or no surprise that Ambrose was the winner of both the 2007 Carmine Caruso International Jazz Trumpet Solo Competition and 2007 Thelonious Monk International Jazz Competition.

Tuesday, March 23, 2010

Jazz for Curious Listeners                               
The Big Beat: Art Blakey                                                                                 THE EARLY YEARS: with Fletcher Henderson, Thelonious Monk and Billy Eckstine

7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Art Blakey's first musical education came in the form of piano lessons; he was playing professionally as a seventh grader, leading his own commercial band. He switched to drums shortly thereafter, learning to play in the hard-swinging style of Chick Webb and Sid Catlett. In 1942, he played with pianist Mary Lou Williams in New York. He toured the South with Fletcher Henderson's band in 1943-1944. From there, he briefly led a Boston-based big band before joining Billy Eckstine's new group, with which he would remain from 1944-1947. Eckstine's big band was the famous "cradle of modern jazz," and included (at different times) such major figures of the forthcoming bebop revolution as Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis, and Charlie Parker. When Eckstine's group disbanded, Blakey started a rehearsal ensemble called the Seventeen Messengers. He also recorded with an octet, the first of his bands to be called the Jazz Messengers.

Thursday, March 25, 2010

Harlem Speaks
Dick Griffin, Trombonist
6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

In a career spanning over 30 years, Dick Griffin has performed with some of the biggest names in Jazz and Soul, and has appeared with several symphony orchestras as well. A short list of the luminaries Mr. Griffin has worked with includes: Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Ella Fitzgerald, Tito Puente, Art Blakey, Charles Mingus, Dizzy Gillespie, McCoy Tyner, Marvin Gaye, Michael Jackson, Isaac Hayes, Dionne Warwick, and Lionel Hampton.

Griffin has developed a highly personalized playing style which he calls "circularphonics," a technique that combines the playing of chords on trombone with circular breathing. The expanded range of sounds Griffin creates through his multiphonic technique at times evokes the spirit of such experimental artists as John Coltrane, Rahsaan Roland Kirk, and Sun Ra. Never a follower, however, Griffin has developed a unique style on and for the trombone that goes beyond the influence of even those great musicians.

James Richard Griffin was born and reared in Jackson, Mississippi. His first musical influence was a neighbor known simply as Mr. Jesse. At evening time, all the neighborhood children would stop by to hear Mr. Jesse's impromptu blues guitar compositions with lyrics describing the day's events in rhyme. Griffin began studying piano at age 11 and upon entering high school two years later joined the school's marching band where he learned trombone. His professional career began as a teenager, playing piano and trombone in clubs with drummer classmate Freddie Waits. While in high school he also sang in a doo-wop group which was invited to go on the road and perform with Sam Cooke. In junior college, Griffin won several awards for his arranging skills. In 1963, Griffin graduated from Jackson State University and then pursued graduate studies at Indiana University where he received a Masters Degree in Music Education and Trombone.

It was in Chicago, though, where Griffin met avant-garde jazz giant Sun Ra, that his professional career seriously took off. He spent several summers in the mid-1960s playing with Sun Ra's Arkestra. It was during this period that Griffin first met Rahsaan Roland Kirk, who became a close friend. After moving to New York City in 1967, Griffin made his recording debut with Kirk on the album "The Inflated Tear." As a member of the "Vibration Society," Griffin notated and transcribed music for the sightless Kirk. He went on to record several albums with Kirk, including "Prepare Thyself To Deal With A Miracle," "Rahsaan, Rahsaan," "Left & Right," and "Volunteered Slavery." In the early 1970s, Griffin also played in a big band fronted by the great bassist and composer Charles Mingus. During this year-long association, Mingus provided priceless support by encouraging the young trombonist's writing endeavors. Griffin also spent three years in the house band of the legendary Apollo Theater in Harlem, playing for nearly all the Motown greats, including The Temptations, James Brown and Nancy Wilson.

In 1974, Griffin released his debut album as a leader, "The Eighth Wonder," for Strata-East Records, one of the most successful independent jazz labels of that period. Later, he released "Now Is The Time: The Multiphonic Tribe" for Trident Records. During this period, he also taught music theory and the history of Jazz at Wesleyan University (1975-77) and later at SUNY-Old Westbury (1981-83). In the 1980s, Griffin's career encompassed performances in a wide variety of settings with his own group and with others. As a sideman, Griffin performed with some of the best big band musicians of the time—Benny Bailey, Jimmy Heath, Frank Foster, and Slide Hampton—at the 1980 Winter Olympics in Lake Placid, New York. Later in the decade, Griffin toured and recorded with the internationally-renowned ensemble "Ekaya," led by South African pianist Abdullah Ibrahim (f/k/a Dollar Brand).

As a composer, Griffin completed the "World Vibration Suite," a work for symphony orchestra premiered by the Brooklyn Philharmonic. In 1986, his third album "A Dream For Rahsaan," was released by Ruby Records to critical acclaim. This inspired him to adapt the album for a symphony orchestra and three saxophones, which was the format he had previously employed for the "World Vibration Suite." During the 1990s, he performed in over a dozen international Jazz festivals, both as a leader and in the bands of such diverse talents as Illinois Jacquet, Sun Ra, Charles Gayle, Hilton Ruiz, and Lionel Hampton. Along with such notable artists as Dizzy Gillespie and Sonny Rollins, Griffin appeared in the Heineken Jazz Festival in Rotterdam and, in 1991, he traveled to Canada to headline Ottawa's International Jazz Festival. The German label, Konnex Records, re-released Griffin's first and third albums in 1994 with additional tracks. Griffin then released "All Blues," his fourth album (on Amasaya Records), which features he novel lineup of trombone, organ, guitar, and drums. In addition to the title track by Miles Davis, Griffin performs five originals plus tunes by Ellington, Horace Silver, and Hampton Hawes, paying tribute to the blues environment in which he was nurtured.

One of the most versatile and inventive musicians of today, Griffin has played with symphony orchestras such as The Harlem Philharmonic and The Symphony Of The New World, and has performed in several Broadway shows including "The Wiz," "Me & Bessie," "Raisin," and "Lena" (starring Lena Horne), as well as in the Paris production of "Black & Blue" (starring Linda Hopkins). He has made many television appearances in the U.S. on shows such as "The Today Show", "Soul", "Faces", "The Ed Sullivan Show", and "Like It Is". He also has appeared in the UK on the BBC and on TV programs in Germany, France, and Italy. Finally, he also appeared in the film "The Cotton Club" and performed on the soundtrack for the movie "Gordon's War".

During the past few years, Griffin has performed more extensively with his own group, the Dick Griffin Organ Ensemble, and he also played at the Uncool Jazz Festival in Switzerland with Charles Gayle in 2001. Griffin has also continued to devote his time to his artwork. His abstract paintings and works on paper have been featured in numerous solo and group exhibitions, private and corporate collections in both the U.S. and Europe. Some of his early pieces grace the covers of each of his four CDs.

Tonight you can witness an artist not beholden to genre labels and engage in discussion with him during the audience Q&A portion of the evening.

Friday, March 26, 2010

Harlem in the Himalayas
Luis Bonilla
7:00pm
Location: Rubin Museum of Art
(150 West 17th Street)
$18 in advance | $20 at door |
Box Office: 212-620-5000 ext. 344

If ever an artist could be called an octopus, Luis Bonilla is it. The California raised, Costa Rican trombonist, composer and arranger has sought out, taken in and mastered an incredible array of musical styles. His success as a sideman with such greats as McCoy Tyner, Dizzy Gillespie, Lester Bowie, Tom Harrell, Freddie Hubbard, Astrud Gilberto, Willie Colon and Toshiko Akiyoshi attests not only to the skill and variety of Bonilla’s talent, but also to a mind restlessly committed to exploring some of the most complex and demanding music of our time.

Yet there is nothing rarefied about the Bonilla experience. He has worked as a studio musician with Tony Bennett, Marc Anthony, La India and Mary J. Blige and understands and exploits the liveliness of pop as well as the rhythmic sway and punch of Latin Jazz. Currently a member of the Vanguard Jazz Orchestra, the Afro-Latin Jazz Orchestra under Arturo O’Farrill’s direction  (both 2009 Grammy winners) and Dave Douglas’s latest group (Dave Douglas & Brass Ecstasy), Bonilla is one of those rare artists whose work is always expanding, taking in more and more while remaining singular and focused: “Bonilla may be a trombonist used to handling that big long sliding thing, but when it comes to execution of his ideas, he lets nothing slide” (All About Jazz).

Critics praised his first two albums on the Candid label, Pasos Gigantes (1998) and iEscucha! (2000), acknowledging Bonilla’s ability to give voice to radically different musical sensibilities with an ease and seamlessness that belies the rigor and sophistication of the music. Pasos Gigantes made Jazziz’s top ten Latin list of 1998. Even as early as these first two albums, critics noted Bonilla’s leadership and sophisticated use of tonal colors. As a faculty member at both Temple University and Manhattan School of Music, Bonilla has an intuitive sense in how to bring out the best in those working with him. Listen to any of his albums and you will hear an extraordinary level of trust and inspiration in each band member’s playing. As the critic for All About Jazz noticed, “Bonilla gives his colleagues ample space to breathe, adding momentum to the flow of his compositional ideas.”

His next album, 2007’s Terminal Clarity was a celebration, reflection and aesthetic extension of his years working with Lester Bowie. While retaining the brash harmonic structures of his mentor’s work from Brass Fantasy to his earlier and justly famous work with the Art Ensemble of Chicago, Bonilla adds a “contagious exuberance” (Jazzwise magazine) that is at the heart of his artistic vision. Without in any way diminishing Bowie’s audacity, Bonilla manages to balance “the cerebral and the down-and-dirty (Jazz Times), taking “bold steps to merge Latin genres, free jazz and a variety of other influences" (Latin Jazz Corner).

In Bonilla’s latest album, I Talking Now! (2009), he pushes these disjunctions even harder, politely demanding that we feel connections between wildly disparate styles of music. A heady mix of swing, rock, free jazz, funk, movie soundtracks, avant-garde noise and ballads, I Talking Now, for all its musical diversity, speaks with one voice. It is a distinctly American vision, a gentle craziness that suggests that every one and every sound can co-exist if we just keep on taking in more and more. Luis Bonilla is moving in directions that are expanding our notions of jazz and leading us into startling new realms with “remarkable creativity and versatility” (Newsday).

Tuesday, March 30, 2010
Christian McBride/Loren Schoenberg Duo/Informance
at Stanford University's Community School for Music and Arts, Mountain View

Tuesday, March 30, 2010 | 6:00 pm

Community School for Music and Arts, Mountain View

The annual duo concert/lecture by the NJMH’s dynamic directors!
ALSO – SAME NIGHT: Jazz for Curious Listeners
The Big Beat:
Art Blakey  FILM NIGHT

7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Don’t miss this free session with one of the world’s best bass instrumentalists sharing his views on, and selections by, Art Blakey, in this last of a month-long series of events focused on the man affectionately called “Buhaina.”

Wednesday, March 31, 2010

A TRIBUTE TO HERBIE HANCOCK: CHRISTIAN McBRIDE AND FRIENDS

Wednesday, March 31, 2010 | 8:00 pm
Stanford University's Dinkelspiel Auditorium

$34–38 (Adult) | $10 (Stanford Student)
$31–35 (Other Student)
$17–19 (Youth Under 18)
In a concert curated by the National Jazz Museum in Harlem (NJMH), museum co-director and bass phenom Christian McBride leads a tribute to the legacy of pioneering jazz composer/keyboardist Herbie Hancock. McBride has long embraced electric jazz, funk, and soul music as a vibrant part of the jazz mainstream. Here, he leads his versatile band through Hancock’s incredible body of work, from his years as a Miles Davis sideman and Blue Note Records solo artist in the 1960s, through his groundbreaking Headhunters fusion project in the ’70s, to his work with pop vocalists and producers in the ’80s and ’90s, and his current interest in young hip hop and techno artists. The concert is the culmination of a season of free public programs on jazz and technology, and a continuation of Lively Arts’ collaboration with NJMH and the Stanford Jazz Workshop, revisiting classic jazz repertoire from a fresh perspective.

***note: the JAZZ AT THE DWYER with Etienne Charles and his Trinidadian Jazz Band will occur on APRIL 23rd, not MARCH 23 as listed on our mailing card.

Prez Fest 2010 March 14, 2010 Celebrating Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers

During his life time, the legendary drummer Art Blakey performed at Saint Peter’s Church, ‘The Jazz Church,” many times. He was well known for his Jazz Messengers “school of jazz” which produced many legendary jazz musicians of today, including Wayne Shorter, Cedar Walton, Terrence Blanchard, Billy Harper, Brian Lynch, Donald Harrison, Reggie Workman, Bobby Watson and many others. All told there were 150 musicians who passed through his “school” over several decades.

For this festival, we are partnering with the National Jazz Museum in Harlem, 104 East 126th Street # 2C, New York City which is offering a series of events celebrating the legacy of Art Blakey including Jazz for Curious Listeners on Tuesdays in March from 7 to 8 PM and on Saturday, March 13 from Noon to 4 PM “An In-Depth Look and Listen to Art Blakey” panel.

Prez Fest 2010 Celebrating Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers – March 14, 2010 at Saint Peter’s Church, 619 Lexington Avenue at 54th Street, NY, NY.  Program begins at 3 PM and includes panel discussion, drum technique demonstration, jazz vespers and a concert.  $20 suggested ticket donation and $10 students donation with student ID.  http://www.saintpeters.org/ 212 935 2200. Take the “E” train to Lexington Avenue or the “6” to 51st Street. Press contacts: Ike Sturm, 212 935 2200 or Lynne Mueller 917 207 4953.

The Jazz Committee at Saint Peter’s Church / Midtown Arts Commons presents:

Prez Fest 2010 – March 14, 2010

Celebrating Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers

Saint Peter’s Church “The Jazz Church”

619 Lexington Avenue at 54th Street, New York City

Tickets Here

Martin Sexton tour to hit Bonnaroo

Martin Sexton’s spring and summer tour dates have just been announced and include several highlights: appearances at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival and Bonnaroo, plus a run of dates supporting Dave Matthews Band.

Starting close to home with a New Haven date on April 15, he will headline such key markets as DC 930 Club, New York Nokia Theatre, Chicago Park West, Los Angeles House of Blues, San Francisco The Fillmore, Vancouver Commodore, Boston House of Blues and more.

The New York Times noted that Sexton “jumps beyond standard fare on the strength of his voice, a blue-eyed soul man’s supple instrument . . . his unpretentious heartiness helps him focus on every soul singer’s goal: to amplify the sound of an ordinary heart.” And Rolling Stone adds, “His outstanding taste in songwriting as well as a soul marinated voice that can easily be compared to the likes of a young Steve Winwood or Van Morrison.”

Sexton exclaims, "It's an exciting year: I've got a brand-new record and a new band. I feel strongly about the songs I'm singing and we look forward to hopping on the bus and spreading it around the world."

Upcoming Tour Dates:

Thurs., April 15  NEW HAVEN, CT Toad’s Place

Fri., April 16  WASHINGTON, DC 9:30 Club

Sat., April 17 BOSTON, MA House of Blues

Sun., April 18 SYRACUSE, NY Wescott Theatre

Tues., April 20 TRAVERSE CITY, MI City Opera House

Wed., April 21 ANN ARBOR, MI The Ark (2 shows)

Thurs., April 22 INDIANAPOLIS, IN The Vogue

Fri., April 23 CHICAGO, IL Park West

Sat., April 24  MADISON, WI Majestic Theatre

Sun., April 25  ST PAUL, MN Fitzgerald Theatre

Wed., April 28  NEW ORLEANS, LA House of Blues

Thurs., April 29 NEW ORLEANS, LA Jazz & Heritage Festival

Fri., April 30  ATLANTA, GA Variety Playhouse

Sat., May 1  NASHVILLE, TN Mercy Lounge

Wed., May 5  PHOENIX, AZ Compound Grill

Thurs., May 6  SAN DIEGO, CA Belly Up

Fri., May 7  SAN FRANCISCO, CA The Fillmore

Sat., May 8   W. HOLLYWOOD, CA House of Blues

Sun., May 9 SACRAMENTO, CA Harlow’s

Tue, May 11 ARCATA, CA Humboldt Brewery

Wed., May 12  EUGENE, OR W.O.W. Hall

Thurs., May 13  VANCOUVER, BC Commodore Ballroom

Fri., May 14 PORTLAND, OR Crystal Ballroom

Sat., May 15 SEATTLE, WA The Showbox

Sun., May 16  SPOKANE, WA Knitting Factory

Tue, May 18 BOISE, ID Knitting Factory

Wed., May 19 SALT LAKE CITY, UT The Depot

Thurs., May 20 DENVER, CO Ogden Theatre

Fri., May 21 KANSAS CITY, MO Crosstown Station

Sat., May 22  ST. LOUIS, MO The Pageant

Sun., May 23  CINCINNATI, OH 20th Century Theatre

Sat., June 5  NEW YORK NY Nokia Theatre

Fri., June 11  MANCHESTER, TN Bonnaroo

Wed., June 23 CLARKSTON, MI DTE Energy Music Theatre;

w/ Dave Matthews Band

Fri., June 25 CUYAHOGA FALLS, OH Blossom Music Center;

w/Dave Matthews Band

Wed. June 30 CAMDEN, NJ Susquehanna Bank Center;

w/Dave Matthews Band

Thurs., July 1 CAMDEN, NJ Susquehanna Bank Center;

w/Dave Matthews Band

Live Trey Anastasio Webcast Tonight!

Tune in to iClips.net for this very special FREE presentation of Trey Anastasio and Classic TAB Live from the Pageant in St. Louis, MO on February 23, 2010. Start times are 8:30 p.m. EST, 7:30 CST, 6:30 MST, & 5:30 PST.

Classic TAB, which has backed Trey on many of his solo projects, recently hit the road following the triumphant return of Phish in 2009. This tour is the first for Trey Anastasio and Classic TAB since they went out as a quartet last fall.

ALSO:

Trey Anastasio to Present at Rock n' Roll Hall of Fame: Trey Anastasio is inducting rock group Genesis into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame next month.  The presenters were announced Tuesday by the hall, which is based in Cleveland.  Wyclef Jean will honor Jimmy Cliff. Barry and Robin Gibb of the Bee Gees will induct ABBA. Green Day's Billie Joe Armstrong is set to honor The Stooges. And Jackson Browne will induct David Geffen.  The induction ceremony takes place March 15 in New York and will air live on Fuse TV at 8:30 p.m. EST.