fillmore

Collectors' Choice introduces CCM Live label: J. WInter, Hot Tuna, Poco. J. Denver

Collectors’ Choice Music, the label that’s come to be known for compelling and often unexpected CD reissues, has announced the launch of Collectors’ Choice Music Live, a new label devoted to releasing great live performances, most of which have never previously been commercially available.

The series will launch April 20 with the release of four CDs: Johnny Winter And’s Live at the Fillmore East 10/3/70; Poco’s Live at Columbia Studios, Hollywood 9/30/71; Hot Tuna’s Live at the New Orleans House, Berkeley, CA September 1969; and John Denver’s Live at Cedar Rapids, 12/10/87.

According to Collectors’ Choice Music GM Gordon Anderson, “After some 15 years of reissuing albums and compiling artists, we’re convinced that some of the biggest remaining veins of gold in the vaults are the live shows that a lot of labels recorded of their artists in their prime, particularly those who made their reputation with improvisational prowess and/or ever-changing set lists. These first four releases on our new Collectors’ Choice Music Live label certainly fit that description.”

Johnny Winter And — Live at the Fillmore East 10/3/70: To commemorate the release of his Johnny Winter And album, Texas blues guitarist/singer Johnny Winter played some shows at New York’s Fillmore East, some of which were compiled on 1971’s Live Johnny Winter And, a classic live album of the era to which this release makes a nice bookend. He had just formed a new band consisting of former member of the McCoys (“Hang on Sloopy”) including Rick Derringer on guitar, bassist Randy Jo Hobbs, and drummer Randy Zehringer. Although the McCoys were none too familiar with Winter’s work, they proved quick studies and entered the studio to make the album Johnny Winter And within three weeks. The New York Times reviewed the Fillmore show, citing “a considerable improvement over Winter’s previous band. Winter and [Derringer] played solos back at each other, simultaneously and in alternation.” The live album contains the Winter hit “Rock and Roll Hoochie Coo” and his take on Bob Dylan’s “Highway 61” alongside  blues classics “Rollin’ and Tumblin’,” “It’s My Own Fault” and “Good Morning Little Schoolgirl.”

•Poco —Live at Columbia Studios, Hollywood, 9/30/71: In the fall of ’71, Poco was arguably the most popular of the first generation country-rock bands. By then, their album Deliverin’ had cracked the Top 30 and Poco thanked its label, Epic Records, with a private showcase at the CBS Records’ Hollywood studio.  “We just set up as we would have for a small club,” recalls frontman Richie Furay, whose bandmates included guitarist/singer Paul Cotton (from the Illinois Speed Press), bassist Tim Schmidt (later of the Eagles), pedal steel player Rusty Young and drummer/vocalist George Grantham. By this time, Poco was evolving from country-rock towards an edgier rock sound. Says Furay, “Though we were innovators of the L.A. ‘country-rock’ sound, we weren’t going top be pigeonholed into being a one-sound band.” The 14 songs they performed for label employees that day were a solid cross-section of tunes that had appeared on its first four albums including the medley “Hard Luck Child/Child’s Claim to Fame/Pickin’ Up the Pieces,” plus “I Guess You Made It,” “A Man Like Me,” “Ol’ Forgiver,” “Heart That Music,” “Hurry Up,” “You Are the One” and more — an hour of music in all.

Hot Tuna: Live at the New Orleans House, Berkeley, CA September 1969: Hot Tuna was, of course, the blues band-within-a-band side project of Jefferson Airplane’s Jorma Kaukonen and Jack Casady that outlasted the parent band and continues to this day. Interestingly, the duo’s first commercial album, which made it to #30 on the Billboard pop album chart, was recorded live at Berkeley’s New Orleans House, but a lot more material was taped than was released. Much of it is issued for the first time on this 68-minute CD, which consists entirely of previously unreleased recordings. Explaining why they recorded their debut album was recorded live, Kaukoken says, “We tend to go places . . . and you lose a bit of that when you work in the studio. And it was cheaper too!” Of the 13 songs on this CD, six — “Death Don’t Have No Mercy,” “Winin’ Boy Blues,” “Uncle Sam Blues,” “I Know You Rider,” “Don’t You Leave Me Here” and “How Long Blues” — were included on the first Hot Tuna album, though the versions here are selected from different performances than the ones used on that LP.  Other songs include Blind Boy Fuller’s “Keep On Truckin’,” Rev. Gary Davis’ “Keep Our Lamps Trimmed and Burning” and “Candy Man,” and Blind Blake’s “That’ll Never Happen No More.”

John Denver: Live at Cedar Rapids, December 10, 1987: What is the sound of an audience eating out of the palm of a performer’s hand? Utter silence. And that’s what was heard during the two-hour-plus Iowa concert that comprises this two-CD set.  By 1987, Denver’s days as a Top 40 hitmaker were a decade in the past, but he remained a solid concert draw as a beloved, thoroughly American artist with a permanent place in the history of pop. It says much about Denver’s songwriting that, with the exception of half a dozen songs on which he’s accompanied by string quartet, he delivers two hours of solo music just his voice and 12-string guitar. The hits are here but so are new songs, some early-repertoire nuggets and a well-chosen cover or two.  Included are “Farewell Andromeda (Welcome to My Morning,” ”Take Me Home Country Roads,” “Rocky Mountain High,” “Annie’s Song,” “Love Is the Master,” “Mother Nature’s Son,” “Blow Up Your TV (Spanish Pipe Dream),” “Shanghai Breezes,” “Ohio” and more.

Yonder Mountain String Band | Fillmore | Denver, CO | 12/30/09

Catching hometown jamgrass legends Yonder Mountain String Band has become a Denver holiday tradition, as the band has performed New Year's Eve concerts here every year for the better part of the last decade.  From electric performances at the Paramount Theater, a supporting/collaborative effort last year with Widespread Panic at the Pepsi Center, to multiple showings at the Fillmore Auditorium the band has routinely and successfully rung in each New Year with the Colorado faithful.

The Builders And The Butchers Play DENVER At The Fillmore

It was a typical rainy Portland afternoon at Ray Rude’s house (who plays “drums” in The Builders), hanging with friends when Ryan decided to show them what he was working on.  Something clicked that afternoon and within minutes everyone in attendance found something to play.  Alex Ellis happened to have an old acoustic bass, and Harvey Tumbleson had borrowed a Mandolin, Ray sat down at the piano and they just started playing.  Paul Seely joined the band a week later as a drummer and instrumentalist and The Builders and The Butchers were born.

Starting innocently enough as a fully acoustic rambling bunch, seeking out audiences on street corners and outside of venues, make no mistake this is not another story of busking come good, The Builders were not looking for money nor were they looking for fame, they were just playing the music they wanted to on their own terms. The band didn’t work out parts on these early songs, they were developed playing on the street, and this philosophy carries through today, by choosing to develop songs live or at rehearsal.  Ryan Sollee says “Something special happens when we get in a room and try to work out a song.  If I come in with a developed song it never seems to sound as good or it does not sound like The Builders.” In particular it was at these performances that Ray and Paul worked out their unique “deconstructed” drum style.

They played in the rain and cold of Portland winters until instruments were warped and broken, then one day the Builders sold out and booked a real show, then another, and crowds soon were seeking the Builders out.  At the early shows it was hard to distinguish the band from the audience, nothing was mic'd or amplified, and seemingly everyone in the audience had a shaker, washboard, or were just beating on the wall and singing.  All in attendance saw something special happening, a Portland audience was having fun, singing along and participating, the music demanded a celebration.  Within a year, the Builders would win the Willamette Week’s “Best New Band of 2008” and Seattle Sound’s “Best Live Performers 2008”and completed supporting tours with the Helio Sequence, Brand New, Langhorne Slim, Amanda Palmer, Dax Riggs, Murder By Death and Port O’brien.

The Builders don't pay homage to old America, they channel it.  All of the basic instruments are there, acoustic bass, drum, guitar, banjo, and mandolin.  They mix gospel, blues, and bluegrass and howl desperate story-songs that latch onto your brain and demand immediate attention.

The timeless sound of their songs, harkens back to a time long passed in music, but reflecting the dark times of the present.  Their self-titled debut was released in 2007 and showcases the bands early raw sound. Their latest release titled Salvation Is A Deep Dark Well is a much more complete work showcasing the bands full potential.  On Salvation, the Builders worked with producer Chris Funk from the Decemberists who brought with him a throng of expertise, patience, instruments, and some of the best musicians in Portland.  Salvation record combines the immediacy of the Builders early work with more a developed songwriting, each one with its own personality and story to tell.  In the vein of the Southern Gothic tales Ryan weaves stories of struggle with the usual cast of characters God, the Devil, soldiers, branches, wind, rain and hell fire.  The record starts with a piano chord and an eerie wind escalating into the thunderous “Golden and Green”, stomp and grinds its way through “Devil Town” and “The Short Way Home”, to the Spanish tinged “Barcelona and “Raise Up”, and the soaring chorus of “In The Branches”, ending with a lesson of hope in the gospel homage“The World is a Top”.

The story of Salvation is a Deep Dark Well is that there’s joy and celebration through the darkness, there’s light in the hardest of times, and when you reach the bottom may salvation light your way.

US Tour With Brand New And Manchester Orchestra
10/08 - Fillmore - Denver, CO
10/09 - Salt Palace Convention Center - Salt Lake City, UT
10/13 - Roseland - Portland, OR
10/15 - Rabobank Arena - Bakersfield, CA
10/16 - Event Center at San Jose - San Jose, CA
10/17 - Hollywood Palladium - Los Angeles, CA
10/20 - House of Blues - San Diego, CA
10/21 - House of Blues - San Diego, CA
10/22 - Mesa Ampetheater - Mesa, AZ

Tom Constanten & Zen Tricksters Together For Fillmore 40th

LiveDead- for the Grateful Web

In celebration of the return of the Dead, the historic 3/2/69 Fillmore West show will be brought back to life by The Zen Tricksters on 3/2/09 at Mexicali Live in Teaneck, NJ to give all who missed it an opportunity to experience it live. The Zen Tricksters, New York-based jamband who Phil Lesh termed as "brilliant players" (Jeff Mattson, Klyph Black, Tom Circosta, and Dave Diamond) will be joined by special guest Tom Constanten, Grateful Dead pianist who performed at the original show, and former Zen Tricksters drummer, Joe Chirco, to fill out the second drummer position. 3/2/69 was the last of a four-day run at the Fillmore, and some of the material from that show was included in the classic Grateful Dead album "Live Dead." The entire
run of these shows was released in 2005 by Rhino Records in a limited edition boxed set, and sold out immediately.

"In 1969, at the height of the Grateful Dead's rise from the San Francisco ballroom scene, the band recorded a live album over four nights at the Fillmore West, "Live/Dead," that's considered not only one of the band's best, but one of the best live albums ever made." Joel Selvin - SF Chronicle

THE 40th ANNIVERSARY of the Grateful Dead at Fillmore West March 2, 1969
The Zen Tricksters with special guest TOM CONSTANTEN (Grateful Dead) and Joe Chirco will perform the entire show forty years to the day on March 2, 2009 at Mexicali Live

THE SHOW

Set ONE
1. Dark Star
2. St. Stephen
3. The Eleven
4. Turn On Your Love Light

SET TWO
1. Doin' That Rag
2. That's It For The Other One
3. Death Don't Have No Mercy
4. Morning Dew

SET THREE
1. Alligator
2. Drums
3. Jam
4. Caution (Do Not Stop On Tracks)
5. Feedback
6. We Bid You Goodnight

Halloween with Leftover Salmon at the Fillmore Auditorium

photos by Mike Moran- for the Grateful Web

Live Nation proudly presents LEFTOVER SALMON at the Fillmore Auditorium on Friday, October 31st.   Showtime is 7:00 PM. Doors open at 6:00 PM. Our fan ticketing will go on sale (HERE) today August 7th starting at 10am MST. The remaining tickets will be available thru ticketmaster starting Saturday August 9th.

After a four year hiatus, Leftover Salmon will again return to the Fillmore in Denver for its once traditional Halloween blowout. Following a summer full of festival dates, Leftover Salmon's Halloween show will mark one of the very few stand alone performances by the band since taking a break at the end of 2004.

The band is also offering music downloads to fans signed up on the Leftover Salmon email list. The downloads feature tunes recorded during recent live performances. The current download is from the Salmon set at the Mile High Music Fest in Denver, which went down just last month. GO HERE to download.

 

New York Dolls "Live At Fillmore East"

photos by Sherry Rubel- for the Grateful Web

New York Dolls announce the release of their brand new unabashed live album. Recorded in December of last year at NYC's Fillmore East, this disc captures ten prime tracks from the reunited Dolls:  "Babylon," "Trash," "Jet Boy," "Personality Crisis," "Rainbow Store," "Looking for a Kiss," "Puss 'N' Boots," "Dance Like a Monkey," "Pills," and "Lonely Planet Boy." Its everything you have come love about the Dolls over their giant spanning career, yet still keeps you on your toes and wanting more.

Morrissey recently exclaimed this with a fervor that somehow made his chronologically impossible claims seem plausible. Watching footage of the 'Dolls onstage two years ago at the behest of one of their biggest fans (who was curating the prestigious Meltdown Festival in London) one realized just how vast - and heretofore unsung - their influence truly was. Everyone knows the famous logo: chrome lipstick, scrawling that name across an unseen mirror, but it's more than the great brand. It's not about the androgyny either. Skinny boys were wearing make up long before them. Little Richard. Elvis. It's not even about the music, as the Dolls themselves were always quick to credit 50's R&B numbers or early 60's girl group productions as their own influences. Really, what makes the Dolls so eternal is the attitude - it got into rock's water supply and never left. Kiss, Aerosmith, The Ramones, Blondie, The Sex Pistols, The Damned, Motley Crue, Guns N' Roses, Hanoi Rocks, The Strokes, The Libertines and just about any gang of strutting rockers who are convinced that their band could take your band and possibly your whole town in a pretty for pretty, ugly for ugly throwdown. The Dolls, and their disciples win, not just with brawn but with what guitarist Sylvain Sylvain calls "plenty of intellect and plenty of sex."

Thirty five years into their existence (thirty one since they disbanded down in Florida in a haze of smack withdrawal and managerial anarchy), with three men down, they can still take your band, pretty for pretty, ugly for ugly, onstage, and now, with the long (long) awaited follow up to 1974's awesome Too Much, Too Soon, on CD too. "You know how England is," David Johansen quips in his Staten Island drawl, thick as South Ferry sludge, "We made a big noise over there, and we were having so much fun, we decided to keep going." "The phone didn't stop ringing," Sylvain adds, "The kids wanted this. Kids of all ages." An album's worth of brand new New York Dolls compositions, as unlikely as it may have seemed in 2003, was a foregone conclusion after wildly successful festival and live dates that spanned the past two years. They were a reunion when they re-started. Now, with replacement members feeling comfortable stepping into the stack heels of departed legends like Johnny Thunders, Jerry Nolan, and most recently Arthur "Killer" Kane, they're a gang once more. "It won't be very long that we'll be together longer than the original band was," Johansen laughs.

July 12 - Kent, UK - Down on the Farm Festival

July 13 - Copenhagen, Denmark - Club Vega - Headline

July 16 - Athens, Greece - Fly Beeyond Festival

July 18 - Benicassim, Spain - FIB Festival

July 24 - Stezanno, Italy - Druso Under the Sky Festival

July 25 - Pinarella Di Cervia, Italy - Rock Planet Club - Headline

July 29 - Tel Aviv, Israel - Heatwave Festival  w/ Morrissey

Aug 2 - Lokeren, Belgium - Lokerse Festeen Festival

More Dates To Be Added...

Keller Williams & The WMD'S to Perform at The Fillmore

photos by Tim Hurley- for the Grateful Web

Keller Williams has been called guitar's mad-scientist, a one-man band for the new millennium, and dozens of other clever sobriquets dreamed up by fans and music journalists trying to get a handle on his uplifting and ever-shifting style of music. Though Keller's music has evolved since he first started playing music over twenty years ago, some things have remained constant: Keller is a prolific artist, an exceptional guitarist, and an accomplished songwriter.  Now, Keller's twelfth album release looks back at a ground-breaking and already remarkable career.  Aptly titled 12, the album features one standout song from each of his previous eleven releases.  Keller himself dubs this his album of "hitless greatest hits." Added to the mix is one new, previously un-recorded song. While the Keller Williams adventure has only just begun, 12 is a fantastic celebration of a musical milestone.  Look for 12 in stores on December 18, 2007 on SCI Fidelity Records.

In early 2008 Keller Williams and The WMD'S will hit the road for a short run of dates. The WMD'S debuted at select festival performances this past summer, including an epic and electrifying Bonnaroo show.  Since then, the band has brought the show to theatres in select markets.  The WMD'S features Williams on guitar/vocals, Keith Moseley on bass (The String Cheese Incident),  Gibb Droll on guitar (Marc Broussard), and Jeff Sipe on drums (Aquarium Rescue Unit, Trey Anastasio, Susan Tedeschi, Phil Lesh). 

The current list of confirmed Keller Williams tour dates is as follows:

December 31 Tweeter Center Camden NJ w/ The Disco Biscuits

January 17 Orange Peel Asheville NC Keller Williams and The WMD'S

January 18 City Hall Nashville TN Keller Williams and The WMD'S

January 19 The Pageant St. Louis MO Keller Williams and The WMD'S

January 20 The Blue Note Colombia MO Keller Williams and the WMD'S

January 22 Liberty Hall Lawrence KS Keller Williams and the WMD'S

January 23 George's Majestic Fayetteville AK Keller Williams and The WMD'S

January 24 Cain's Ballroom Tulsa OK Keller Williams and The WMD'S

January 25 House of Blues Dallas TX Keller Williams and The WMD'S

January 26 La Zona Rosa Austin TX Keller Williams and The WMD'S

January 31 – February 01 Belly Up Aspen CO Keller Williams and The WMD'S

February 02 Fillmore Auditorium Denver CO Keller Williams and The WMD'S

February 23 Sugarloaf Ski Resort - Carrabassett Valley ME Keller Williams and The WMD'S

March 09 Langerado Music Festival Big Cypress FL

 

Keller Williams has been refining his unique kind of performance art for almost 15 years, logging over 100 gigs annually, and he's a productive recording artist as well.  His calling card?  - a creative combination of talent and technology.  Known, of course, for his astonishing one-man show, Keller Williams surrounds himself with instruments and pedals and slides from one to the next. While his songs are rooted in Williams' warm voice and spirited acoustic guitar, Keller gives them depth and breadth via looping and delay. Keller essentially accompanies himself, looping several instruments, and filling up an entire room with lush layers of sound … just one man and a humongous imagination. 

The Raconteurs | Fillmore Auditorium | Denver

It's hot out tonight. The temp in Denver is over 100 degrees. The weather man will tell you it has something to do with the Heat Index, I say it's because The Raconteurs are playing the Fillmore tonight and they brought the scorching heat with them.

WSP Kicks Off Their Four Night Run At The Fillmore

Widespread Panic- for the Grateful Web

In the Wake of Vegoose, Widespread Panic quietly embarked on not only their first ever appearance at The Fillmore in Denver, but a 4-night run at that. I was lucky enough to score a ticket for this Thursday night kick off and as people meandered around the block surrounding the venue you could tell spirits were high.

 

I'm coming up on the ten year anniversary of my first Panic show back in Georgia and as much as things have changed since then, its good to know some are still around. Of course, Panic has been through a lot changes with the loss of founder member Mikey Houser, adding new lead guitarist George McConnell and just exploring new musical avenues in general, but their music plays on. Panic almost personifies life in a way; its not always so great, things end and others begin but the train keeps rolling and you have to make the best with what you got if it feels good. Well, what can I say? It feels damn good.

 

The band started things off smoothly with old-time original The Take Out and was followed by James Taylor's Knocking 'Round the Zoo. Panic rocks this tune out like it's their own and was aptly played with JB singing "Just knocking 'round the zoo on a Thursday afternoon." Good People is a newer original and is a testament to the band's future songwriting capabilities. The next song, Who Do You Belong To?, always reminds me of listening to my old analog tapes during college in the South. That means nothing to you folks, I know, but the song choice was perfect.

 

The boys kept the show trucking along with a floor rockin' Dyin' Man and then another old classic, Pickin' Up The Pieces. Pickin' is a slightly slower song with a subtle jazz swing that once again sent my mind wondering. Panic's songs have a timeless feel to them that remind you of the first time you heard the song and yet feels fresh at the same time. Another aptly played tune, One Armed-Steve, had keyboard/piano player, Jo-Jo Hermann, singing, "Well, One-Arm Steve, yeah he threw me out the door, said 'come back sometime when your picture's on the wall". Anyone that's stepped foot in a Fillmore knows the walls are covered with amazing photos of musical acts that have graced their stages. Widespread Panic had now made the Denver wall.

 

The first set ended with an amazing medley beginning with a cover of Bob Dylan's Baby, Let Me Follow You Down that they pulled off quite well. Lead guitarist, George McConnell pulled off a short solo that Robbie Robertson would have beeen proud of. This gem led into the stop-and-go composed epic, Conrad. The story of Conrad the Caterpillar twists its way to an amazing set closing jam and climatic lyrical return, "I just need a little room to fly, I spent all of my days just trying to keep dry. Oh, I'd take a waterfall or a drop for my eye, I can't see nothin' from here anyway, I might as well make room and try…might as well try."

 

The piano bar bouncing Greta let Jo-Jo show off his dexterity and set the tone for a festive second set. Dirty Business, originally written by the New Riders of the Purple Sage, has been in the Panic repertoire for sometime now and is always a fun one to hear. Dirty Business melted into a dark segue that eventually led into the newer tune, You Should Be Glad held down by one of the many catchy Dave Schools bass lines. The mesh of music continued as the band morphed into the live favorite, Bears Gone Fishin'. At about this time in the concert, if you haven't realized that Dave Schools is one of the baddest bass players in the scene, you aren't paying attention. The man provides such an original sounding low end that blends melody and intricate note placement all you can do is nod your head and smile.

 

Just when I thought I had probably heard all the old stuff for the night, they put me right in my place. Blight, a Panic tune that caught my ear nearly ten years ago, comes thumping from Schools's bass while Sonny Ortiz on percussion and drummer Todd Nance pick up the beat. Blight dissolves into a Drums breakdown to which the band leaves the stage for a brief stint as Schools comes back on stage for some Drums and Bass. A few teases later, I'm certain I heard a Dark Star tease in there, the band remerges for R.L. Burnside's Snake Drive, a hard-hitting blues rocker.

 

A slight downshift in the set found the band meandering through the swirling sounds of the old Robert Johnson tune, Me and the Devil Blues, which Panic released on their official debut album Space Wrangler back in 1988. Yes, sir, the song selection was right up my alley tonight and the rest of the crowd seemed to agree. The jam out of Me and the Devil Blues rolled like a runaway train picking up speed and eventually settling into Neil Young's Mr. Soul. A regularly played, but always welcomed, All Time Low was next and had its standard peak at the end that never ceases to get feet moving and people smiling. Rock ended this great set and gave JB one last chance to sing from his whiskey-stained belly. I mean that in a good way.

 

The encore was an uplifting one, starting with NRBQ's Help Me Somebody led by Jo-Jo's rolling piano work and accompanying JB vocals. And if there is ever a song you can expect Panic to finish with after a show like that, it's Ain't Life Grand. The bar was set for this 4-night run, and set pretty high at that. You have to approach these things like a marathon. If I know Panic, and I don't, tonight was a warm-up lap and their just getting warmed up. As for tonight, "Everybody's moving but me, but I'm gonna make it home piece by piece."

 

***************************************************************************

 

Past Ryan Reviews:

 

Mountain Jamming with The Allman Brothers Band

 

I'll Have The Widespread Panic With A Side Of Galactic

 

Trey Anastasio & 70VP at Red Rocks