night

Ryan Montbleau Band’s Heavy on the Vine Ripe for Picking

“Time hangs heavy on the vine/Let’s make wine,” Ryan Montbleau sings in the lulling, sensual verse that gives his group’s new album its title. Ryan Montbleau Band has been tending its own musical vineyard for a few years, on the patient cusp of a breakthrough. Their distinctive, long-fermenting blend of neo-folk, classic soul, and kick-out-the-jams Americana finally comes to full fruition in Heavy on the Vine, due out September 21, 2010 on indie Blue’s Mountain Records. It’s an album that represents the product of — and further promise of — a very good year.

It’s been a good year already. The group spent much of it both as opening act and backing band for Martin Sexton, including a round of dates with the Dave Matthews Band. Sexton in turn produced Heavy on the Vine. “I used to dream about getting to meet Martin Sexton,” says Ryan, “and now we’re getting hired as his backing band and he’s producing our record.

“He may not be a household name but to me and so many others, he’s a legend,” Montbleau adds. “But one thing he made clear from the start was that he didn’t want his fingerprints on this record. He wanted us to just play and be us.”

As a songwriter, Ryan recently contributed the single “Something Beautiful” to Trombone Shorty’s recent major-label debut album Backatown. Shorty turned to no less than Lenny Kravitz to contribute vocals and a guitar solo to the track, to help bring across the song’s soulful vibe.  Ryan also co-wrote the Backatown track “One Night Only,” the tune Shorty and his band performed on their Late Night with David Letterman debut in June.

“I’m not one of these people who’s like, ‘Oh, we can’t be pigeonholed.’ I honestly wish we could, just so I could describe it quickly to people,” Montbleau says. “This record has folk songs, funk songs, country tunes, a reggae tune . . . and the end is almost like prog-rock. It’s all over the map, but it’s all us, and we always do it wholeheartedly. We’ve sort of come up in the jam scene, and that’s where our hearts have been in a lot of ways. But we don’t go off on 15-minute epics. We’re actually trying to make the songs shorter as we go. So I would lean more toward the Americana thing than the jam thing. But more than anything, we’re definitely about the song.”

The “us”-ness of the band comes through in Heavy on the Vine in vivid, funny, touching, and hummable spades. The opening “Slippery Road” playfully examines the fine line of moderation between inebriation and sobriety, a subject familiar to most of Montbleau’s contemporaries and more than a few non-musicians. “Carry,” the purest love song Montbleau has written, is in demand as a wedding song by some romantics who’ve heard it being road-tested. “Fix Your Wings” deals with damage and healing in relationships, with tight gospel harmonies adding to the surprisingly sprightly feel. Both the rocking “Here at All” and the ’20s-styled “Stay” address the itinerant musician’s thwarted impulse to settle in one place for more than one night at a time. An admirer of Paul Simon, Montbleau reaches some of his greatest lyrical heights in “Straw in the Wind,” which asks, “Wouldn’t it be nice . . . if you could reconcile the smile you want to feel with the one that you show?”

“For the song ‘More and More and More’ we had done another weirder version in the studio with a strange old synthesizer. But Martin said, ‘We need to try a Rolling-Stones-in-Nashville country version of this,’ with an untuned piano they had in the studio. And it turned out great.”

The Peabody, Mass. native got his first guitar at age nine but didn’t get the bug to become a serious player until he was attending Villanova University. He spent many years as an acoustic solo artist. His first album, Begin (2002), was followed by the live Stages. The first Montbleau Band recording was One Fine Color (2006). And by the time 2007’s Patience on Friday was released, Ryan Montbleau Band (Montbleau, guitar, lead vocals; Laurence Scudder, viola, vocals; Jason Cohen, keyboards; James Cohen, drums; Matt Giannaros, bass, vocals; and Yahuba, percussion, vocals) were hometown heroes.

The band’s unusual makeup was somewhat accidental, as the leader tells it; he never had it in mind, for instance, that he needed a full-time viola player. “It just evolved over the years, because I really didn’t have a sound that I was going for,” he says, before qualifying that claim. “Well, I knew I wanted an upright bass, I guess. And I knew I wanted the drummer in some ways to be more of a jazz drummer than a straight-ahead rock drummer. But that was all I knew. I’ve personally always loved the B3 organ, but the keyboard approach really comes from Jason (Cohen), who’s a vintage gear nut and tone junkie who loves old Rhodes, organs, Wurlitzers, Moogs, etc.”

Abject realism and a sense of limitless possibility coexist in Montbleau’s ever-ripening mind. “For the last 10 years, I’ve had this insane desire to just go out there and do this. And I face the realities that, okay, I’m 33 and I’m not selling out stadiums yet. I get more realistic as I go and I also get more appreciative of just being able to do this at all. My goal for a few years when I was starting out was to make a living off playing music, and now I’ve been doing that for seven years or so, and the goals change as you go. Now the goal is to spend more time practicing and writing and creating, and a little less time doing all the business stuff.”

Tempted as Montbleau might be to look toward the big picture, not losing sight of the small one is why the band has maintained such a loyal and evangelistically inclined base. “I still go back to my original philosophy of just one person at a time,” he says. “I never even told people ‘Bring your friends to the show’ at the beginning, because it wasn’t about them bringing their friends, it was about them bringing themselves. I’m trying to focus on the one person, because if they come and like it, they are going to bring their friends. We’re still grass roots in that way.” No surprise, then, that those well-tended roots have sprung up into such pregnant vines.

Girl Talk Releases NYE Chicago Documentary

In the first few days of 2010, we shared news of Girl Talk’s mind-blowing, over-the-top New Year’s Eve extravaganza, where he threw one of the largest house parties the world has seen to celebrate the end of the decade. With so much time and effort put into making this such an extraordinary night, Girl Talk (aka Gregg Gillis) and his crew decided not just those in attendance, but all Girl Talk fans, should have a chance to see the insanity. The planning and show was documented on multiple HD cameras, and has now been made into a short film that’s almost ready to be shared. You can get a sneak peek of “Girl Talk NYE Chicago” by checking out the trailer here.

To give you an idea, here’s what went down: As a surprise to the 4,500-capacity Congress Theatre audience in Chicago, Girl Talk had a two-story, five room house built on stage. This house took months to plan, and 4+ full days and 21+ crewmembers to build. Girl Talk and the set designers seriously took things to the next level when it came to the detail that went into each aspect of the house. They drywalled the rooms, made a real staircase, and fake wooden floors, built a kitchen that included a refrigerator with a note stuck on the door, and a table with a fruit bowl, blender and more, a living room that included a hutch filled with china, fireplace, couch, coffee table, rug, picture frames and more, the kid's room had a bed, desk, computer and mouse, pencil jar, trophy, amongst other items, and the bathroom featured a real toilet, sink, shower and curtain. Plus, outside the house, there were even fake trees lining the yard, and a rock was placed in front of the house covering the table Girl Talk works on. The lights constructed on the outside and inside of the house, including an LCD curtain surrounding the house to make it look like the night sky, and all over the venue, were equally elaborate. When the house was first presented to the audience, only a few lamps inside each room were turned on, however, as the night neared midnight, the house counted down from 9 to 0, and then once midnight hit, the house came alive as lights all over the house, inside and out, shown bright. The kitchen floor eventually lit up turning into a disco-dance floor, the entire bathroom could strobe any color, the computer in the kid’s room had an LED light attached to it, and intense lights came from the fireplace. There were also special lights strategically hidden all over the venue that were active and radiant throughout the night. Check out stills from the film below.

Girl Talk has been on the road nonstop since Feed The Animals was released in June 2008. After playing over 240 shows and rarely taking more than five days off at a time, Gregg has finally taken a break for most of the summer to work on his next album, which will be unleashed upon the world in early 2011. Stay tuned for more details!

Girl Talk Upcoming Shows:

Fri. Oct. 29 – Asheville, NC @ MoogFest

Sat. Nov. 20 – Sao Paulo, Brasil @ Planeta Terra Festival w/ Smashing Pumpkins, Pavement

wOOtstock at the Boulder Theatre 10.23

Z2 Entertainment and wOOtstock present Something Or Other Feat:  Adam Savage and Paul & Storm with Special Guest Phil Plait at the Boulder Theater on Saturday October 23rd.

For decades, geeks were ostracized, picked on, laughed at and punished by the sun’s harmful UV rays. But there is only so long that a people can be kept down before they rise up against their oppressors; and, indeed, the dawn of the 21st century has seen the ascendancy of geeks and geek culture.

We now celebrate that rise to power–and let’s face it, nerds pretty much run everything now–with w00tstock, a special event for geeks of every stripe. Television host/special-effects artist Adam Savage (“MythBusters”), actor/author/blogger Wil Wheaton (“Star Trek: The Next Generation”, “Stand By Me”) and music-comedy duo Paul and Storm (The Internet, Da Vinci’s Notebook) present a night of songs, readings, comedy, demonstrations, short films, special guests, and other clever widgets born from and dedicated to the enthusiasms, obsessions, trials and joys of geek pride.

This is the dawning of the Age of Geekdom–and its voices will ring true at w00tstock.

For updates and additions continue to check http://w00tstock.net

Truth & Salvage Co. Singer/Songwriter Files Suit Against Marriott Hotel Corporation

According to a recent lawsuit filed in Tulare County California, Tim Jones--one of the four singers/songwriters of the musical group TRUTH & SALVAGE COMPANY--was shaken awake and ripped from his bed by hotel security and local police while sleeping at the Marriott Hotel in Visalia, CA.  Jones, a Marriott rewards member and a registered guest staying the night at the Visalia Marriott in February 2010,  was handcuffed, assaulted, taken to jail and cited for trespassing and resisting arrest in his own hotel room after performing at a concert earlier in the evening. In the wake of the assault and imprisonment, Jones filed suit against Marriott Hotel Corporation on four counts, including negligence, negligent supervision, assault and battery.

Ironically, Marriott Hotel's slogan is, "Your home away from home." Tim Jones learned the hard way that Marriott's slogan is nothing more than that, simply a slogan. Instead of spending the night in his hotel room, the singer/songwriter was forced to spend the night in a Visalia jail cell. Jones was finally released at noon the following day.

Following the incident Jones said, "I was shocked by the break-in and arrest.  I kept telling them that I was a registered guest but they acted as if they couldn't hear a word I was saying."

One month after the incident, Jones was set to be arraigned in the Tulare County Superior Court. Legal representatives of the band arrived at the courthouse to answer for Jones, only to find that the District Attorney's office had not filed any charges against Jones.  To date, charges have not been filed and Visalia Police have refused to release the police incident report to the Los Angeles based Jordan Law Group, PLC; the Truth and Salvage legal team.  Attorney Vahe Jordan was quoted as saying "We’re hopeful that Marriott will accept responsibility for the way they treated Jones, who has been a loyal customer for many years."

Marriott experienced a public relations nightmare last year that spread in blogs, stemming from the legal position their Stamford, Connecticut franchisee attorneys took when a woman brought suit citing security shortcomings after being raped in the presence of her two children while in a parking structure located at the Stamford Marriott Hotel and Spa.  Court documents filed by the Marriott franchisee attorneys last year state the victim "failed to exercise due care for her own safety and the safety of her children and proper use of her senses and facilities."  The defense was viewed by many as blaming the victim.  Marriott later dropped that defense.

As for Jones, he did not have any outstanding warrants; he wasn't suspected of, nor accused of, any crime prior to being violated by Marriott Security staff and the Visalia Police. He later received medical treatment for injuries sustained during the arrest.

Currently, Tim Jones and his band Truth & Salvage Co. are touring the United States in support of their self-titled debut album (Megaforce Records/Silver Arrow Records) which was released in May of this year and was produced by Chris Robinson of The Black Crowes.  Truth & Salvage Co.--set to make their national television debut on ABC’s “Jimmy Kimmel Live” this Thursday, August 19--was cited as a “Top 10 Band To Watch This Summer” by USA Today and Rolling Stone said the band “has what it takes for the long haul.”  Their album was given 4½ stars by Glide.com, which noted, “Truth and Salvage is an explosion of Americana and sweaty Rock-n-Roll that comes off more like a greatest hits album than a debut...set to become an instant classic."

Ryan Montbleau Band's Martin Sexton-produced album out September 21

“Time hangs heavy on the vine/Let’s make wine,” Ryan Montbleau sings in the lulling, sensual verse that gives his group’s new album its title. Ryan Montbleau Band has been tending its own musical vineyard for a few years, on the patient cusp of a breakthrough. Their distinctive, long-fermenting blend of neo-folk, classic soul, and kick-out-the-jams Americana finally comes to full fruition in Heavy on the Vine, due out September 21, 2010 on indie Blue’s Mountain Records. It’s an album that represents the product of — and further promise of — a very good year.

It’s been a good year already. The group spent much of it both as opening act and backing band for Martin Sexton, including a round of dates with the Dave Matthews Band. Sexton in turn produced Heavy on the Vine. “I used to dream about getting to meet Martin Sexton,” says Ryan, “and now we’re getting hired as his backing band and he’s producing our record.

“He may not be a household name but to me and so many others, he’s a legend,” Montbleau adds. “But one thing he made clear from the start was that he didn’t want his fingerprints on this record. He wanted us to just play and be us.”

As a songwriter, Ryan recently contributed the single “Something Beautiful” to Trombone Shorty’s recent major-label debut album Backatown. Shorty turned to no less than Lenny Kravitz to contribute vocals and a guitar solo to the track, to help bring across the song’s soulful vibe. Ryan also co-wrote the Backatown track “One Night Only,” the tune Shorty and his band performed on their Late Night with David Letterman debut in June.

“I’m not one of these people who’s like, ‘Oh, we can’t be pigeonholed.’ I honestly wish we could, just so I could describe it quickly to people,” Montbleau says. “This record has folk songs, funk songs, country tunes, a reggae tune . . . and the end is almost like prog-rock. It’s all over the map, but it’s all us, and we always do it wholeheartedly. We’ve sort of come up in the jam scene, and that’s where our hearts have been in a lot of ways. But we don’t go off on 15-minute epics. We’re actually trying to make the songs shorter as we go. So I would lean more toward the Americana thing than the jam thing. But more than anything, we’re definitely about the song.”

The “us”-ness of the band comes through in Heavy on the Vine in vivid, funny, touching, and hummable spades. The opening “Slippery Road” playfully examines the fine line of moderation between inebriation and sobriety, a subject familiar to most of Montbleau’s contemporaries and more than a few non-musicians. “Carry,” the purest love song Montbleau has written, is in demand as a wedding song by some romantics who’ve heard it being road-tested. “Fix Your Wings” deals with damage and healing in relationships, with tight gospel harmonies adding to the surprisingly sprightly feel. Both the rocking “Here at All” and the ’20s-styled “Stay” address the itinerant musician’s thwarted impulse to settle in one place for more than one night at a time. An admirer of Paul Simon, Montbleau reaches some of his greatest lyrical heights in “Straw in the Wind,” which asks, “Wouldn’t it be nice . . . if you could reconcile the smile you want to feel with the one that you show?”

“For the song ‘More and More and More’ we had done another weirder version in the studio with a strange old synthesizer. But Martin said, ‘We need to try a Rolling-Stones-in-Nashville country version of this,’ with an untuned piano they had in the studio. And it turned out great.”

The Peabody, Mass. native got his first guitar at age nine but didn’t get the bug to become a serious player until he was attending Villanova University. He spent many years as an acoustic solo artist. His first album, Begin (2002), was followed by the live Stages. The first Montbleau Band recording was One Fine Color (2006). And by the time 2007’s Patience on Friday was released, Ryan Montbleau Band (Montbleau, guitar, lead vocals; Laurence Scudder, viola, vocals; Jason Cohen, keyboards; James Cohen, drums; Matt Giannaros, bass, vocals; and Yahuba, percussion, vocals) were hometown heroes.

The band’s unusual makeup was somewhat accidental, as the leader tells it; he never had it in mind, for instance, that he needed a full-time viola player. “It just evolved over the years, because I really didn’t have a sound that I was going for,” he says, before qualifying that claim. “Well, I knew I wanted an upright bass, I guess. And I knew I wanted the drummer in some ways to be more of a jazz drummer than a straight-ahead rock drummer. But that was all I knew. I’ve personally always loved the B3 organ, but the keyboard approach really comes from Jason (Cohen), who’s a vintage gear nut and tone junkie who loves old Rhodes, organs, Wurlitzers, Moogs, etc.”

Abject realism and a sense of limitless possibility coexist in Montbleau’s ever-ripening mind. “For the last 10 years, I’ve had this insane desire to just go out there and do this. And I face the realities that, okay, I’m 33 and I’m not selling out stadiums yet. I get more realistic as I go and I also get more appreciative of just being able to do this at all. My goal for a few years when I was starting out was to make a living off playing music, and now I’ve been doing that for seven years or so, and the goals change as you go. Now the goal is to spend more time practicing and writing and creating, and a little less time doing all the business stuff.”

Tempted as Montbleau might be to look toward the big picture, not losing sight of the small one is why the band has maintained such a loyal and evangelistically inclined base. “I still go back to my original philosophy of just one person at a time,” he says. “I never even told people ‘Bring your friends to the show’ at the beginning, because it wasn’t about them bringing their friends, it was about them bringing themselves. I’m trying to focus on the one person, because if they come and like it, they are going to bring their friends. We’re still grass roots in that way.” No surprise, then, that those well-tended roots have sprung up into such pregnant vines.

Vincent Minor News & MP3!

Singer/songwriter Vincent Minor, will release his self-titled debut album, September 21 on Social Science Recordings. The album fuses indie pop with classic Tin Pan Alley tunesmithery and then lights the bonfire with colorful, often discordant orchestral arrangements. Unexpected passages of strutting brass, apocalyptic strings and malfunctioning kitchen appliances bring subtlety and life to Minor's stories of danger and heartbreak.

From the fuzzed out guitars and driving beat of “Late Night Show” with it’s tale of LSD in the desert and double-dutch with Morrissey to the gorgeous “Pin Drop Silence” with its escalating piano and strings that sonically recall Bowie’s epic “Rock’n’Roll Suicide”, the album never stops evolving, surprising and mesmerizing. Humor, an unusually wry and dark variety, is also pervasive, as evidenced in tunes like “Heavy Metal Lover” which tells the tale of someone who manipulates through drugging a lover's tea with arsenic rather than dealing a kosher break-up.

Vincent Minor assembled some amazing LA area talents to round out his grand vision including producer Tom Biller (Fiona Apple, Sean Lennon, Where the Wild Things Are), keyboardist Zac Rae (Annie Lennox, My Brightest Diamond), horn player Stewart Cole (Edward Sharpe, Rachael Yamagata), and upright bassist Ed Maxwell. The result is a collection of wryly humorous and troubling tales carried by Minor's tuneful baritone and his orchestrally lush production.

To introduce this album to live audiences Vincent Minor will be embarking on a national tour this summer. He will spend a week in each city and assemble an entirely new band for each show. For an early listen, check out the “Late Night Show” MP3 premiered on the Advocate yesterday. You can download the MP3 here. We encourage you to post & share this MP3 & look out for one of the year’s most exciting debuts!

Listen to Vincent Minor's 'Late Night Show.' {play}images/mp3/Late_Night_Show.mp3{/play}

Gordon Edwards STUFF Tonight at the Creole Restaurant

Come and hear some irresistible R'n'B music from a band led by Stuff's legendary founder, leader and bass player, Gordon Edwards. Gordon has played with many of the world's most notable artists from Aretha Franklin to John Lennon to Joe Cocker to Van McCoy. Two of his excellent sideman in this all star band are Alex Foster-Saxophone (Saturday Night Live) and Mick Gaffney-guitar.

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Gordon Edwards STUFF is:

Alex Foster - sax
Roy Bennett - vocals/bass
Wally Gator - drums
Mick Gaffney - guitar
Jimmy Smith - Piano

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Creole Restaurant & Supper Club
http://www.creolenyc.com/
2167 3rd Avenue
New York, NY 10035-4040
(212) 876-8838

My Morning Jacket to Perform 5 Shows @ NYC's Terminal 5!

Eleven years into their career, Louisville’s My Morning Jacket have released five highly acclaimed, classic albums, the live concert album and DVD Okonokos,  and have been revered for their legendary live performances.  With such an expansive catalogue, it’s been impossible in recent years for the band to perform every last MMJ favorite for one venue… that is, until this October.  In an unprecedented move, New York City’s Terminal 5 will be presenting a historic five night run of shows where the band will perform one of their albums in its entirety on each night.

The stint will kick off on Monday, October 18th with a performance of the Jacket’s debut, 1999’s The Tennessee Fire, and will be followed chronologically by their other four full-lengths, ending with 2008’s Evil Urges on Saturday the 23rd.  After the given album is performed each night, the audience will be treated to a mix of favorites from the band’s catalog as well.  The series of shows are sure to put a magnifying glass over the chameleonic band’s history, highlighting their remarkable tendency to perpetually evolve.

All of the dates will individually go on sale June 18th but for fans who want the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity of experiencing all five nights, there will be a special pre-sale.  Five-show ticket packages will go on sale June 14th.  As with their current upcoming headlining tour dates in August, the band will be donating $1 from each ticket to a local charity.  Please see below for more info on each charity and to purchase tickets, head over to www.terminal5nyc.com.

October 18 - The Tennesee Fire / Charity: Safe Haven of Pike County
www.safehavenofpikecounty.org

October 19 - At Dawn / Charity: The Innocence Project
www.innocenceproject.org

October 21 - It Still Moves / Charity: 826NYC
www.826nyc.org

October 22 - Z / Charity: New York Cares
www.newyorkcares.org

October 23 - Evil Urges / Charity: Sustainable South Bronx
www.ssbx.org

meniskus | Live At The Walnut Room | 2010

The unique sound of meniskus is hard to classify. They have been labeled as Latin, European, House, Trance Rock, but none of these really pinpoint what their music sounds like. At times you can hear a mystic Middle Eastern influence, at other times hints of Ukrainian Punk and ancient ancestral harmonies. The only way to really understand is to see them perform live.  Meniskus's live stage performance is what makes this band great. They have finally caught some of the live energy on their latest release 'LIVE at The Walnut Room' recorded in Denver, Colorado in early 2010.

The opening track 'Morocco' is drenched in the soft nylon strings of  Venezuelan-born Bardusco's guitar and Eric Ostberg's howling violin.  Cris Ryt builds the tempo on the drums until the song eventually erupts like an exploding volcano. This transitions smoothly in to the second song, 'The Equalizer'; a driving, strong riff built on the passionate moans of Ostberg's voice. Track three, Latina really reflects the true sound of meniskus. Ryt provides a tantric techno beat as Ostberg and Bardusco trade leads that lift the soaring strings from high down to crashing bass chords below.  'Again', is one of my new favorites, the march of the drums and shouts of Again providing the attitude of a punk song.  'Sheik Don't Mind' is another reflection of the way these three band members play so well together. The feeling and emotions of each person combine in such a way that the song can sound different from night to night. Their world trance classification can be explained by the next track called 'Nightly Erotic'. It flows like the silken dress of a Persian belly dancer as she dances across the floor.  If ska is polka, and polka is punk, then 'The Partyer' is fun as funk. This is a song for everyone; I could easily see it get plenty of air play on KBCO.  'Brigade' is the anthem of this CD, it reminds me of the strong messages sung by U2 in the 80s.  'Combo' is another quick moving song built on forceful emotions and played as fast as a speeding train; by far my favorite song on the CD.  Last is a bonus studio track called 'Greed'. If this song is any indication of where meniskus is taking their music, we have lots to look forward to from this band in the future.

This band has perfected their skills from years on the road and polished their sound by days spent in the booths of Coupe Studios. It’s good to know the energy of their live shows has finally been captured on their CD.

Truth & Salvage Co. Singer Arrested & Jailed...In His Hotel Room?

Tim Jones, one of the four singers/songwriters of the musical group Truth & Salvage Company, was shaken awake and ripped out of bed at the Marriott Hotel by Visalia Police while asleep in his hotel room.  Jones was subsequently handcuffed, taken to jail and cited for trespassing and resisting arrest in his own hotel room.

Truth & Salvage Co. toured with The Black Crowes throughout 2009 and is currently on tour in support of their debut album scheduled for release May 25, 2010.  While on a recent road trip to Visalia, California, the band finished their show at the Cellar Door and returned to the Marriott Hotel in Visalia at approximately 1 AM.   Two Visalia Police officers and a Marriott security guard entered Jones' room about an hour later and arrested Jones.  According to sources close to the band, the Visalia Police officers unsuccessfully attempted to awake and arrest Walker Young, another Truth & Salvage Co. singer who was sharing the room with Jones.

Instead of spending the night in his hotel room, Tim Jones spent the night in a Visalia jail cell.  He was finally released at noon the following day.

Jones was set to be arraigned in the Tulare County Superior Court on March 9, 2010. Legal representatives of the band arrived at the courthouse to answer for Jones, only to find that the District Attorney’s office had not filed any charges against Jones at the time of the arraignment. To date, the Visalia Police have refused to release the police incident report to the Jordan Law Group who serve as the Truth & Salvage Co. legal team.

A source close to the band said, "It's an abuse of authority for police and hotel security to enter a person's hotel room without a warrant, wake them out of a sound sleep, cite them for trespassing and then haul them off to spend the night in jail."

Jones did not have any outstanding warrants; he wasn’t suspected of, nor accused of, any crime prior to being violated by the Visalia Police and Marriott Security.  He subsequently received medical treatment for injuries suffered during the arrest.  Jones and his fellow band members, intend to aggressively pursue their legal rights.

Jones recently filed a claim for damages with the City of Visalia.