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Craig King's - 'What About Me?' @ Boulder Theater

Still from What About Me?- for the Grateful Web

Craig King presents

What About Me?

Grammy nominated 1Giant Leap sequel

Q&A with director Jamie Catto from UK

At the Boulder Theater

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The Evening Program:

Date: June 15th

6.00 Door Time

Michael jones poet/dj artist will be spinning ambient grooves

7:15 Jamie Catto and Craig king introduce the preview to Here we Grow and the feature presentation of What about Me? Sequel to the Grammy nominated 1Giant Leap

7:30 Preview starts 'Here We Grow' – a documentary on the food industry and a collaboration between Craig King and Jamie Catto.

7:40 Feature presentation of What About Me? 1Giant Leap sequel.

9:25 Open Q&A with Jamie Catto

9:45 The band Portal takes the stage and plays a 45 minute set

10:30 Michael jones steps back in to create an evening of dance and fun till close 12:45ish

Get your ticket $12.00 at www.bouldertheater.com or tickets at door $15.00 Doors open at 6 pm.

Following the success of their first double Grammy nominated film & album, What About Me? Is the latest offering from 1 Giant Leap. This visionary project took Jamie Catto and Duncan Bridge-man to over 50 locations as they explore through music, the complexities of human nature on a global scale, and aims to reveal how we are all connected through our creativity and beliefs, but most of all through our madness. Covering universal topics such as God, Sex, Death and Money, What About Me? features an incredibly diverse collection of collaborators from Noam Chomsky to Will Young, Maxi Jazz to Tim Robbins, Billy Connolly to Michael Stipe, Eckhart Tolle to Baaba Mal, among many others.

 

The vision of the sequel to Grammy nominated 1Giant Leap album and film 'What About Me?" is to illustrate human insanity. It shows how insane we really all are; how we're needy in relationships, insatiable in desire, wounded by birth, avoiding all pain with happy pills and unable to stop think-ing.

 

It features many individuals but especially: Eckhart Tolle, Noam Chomsky, Tim Robbins, Carlos Santana, Michael Stipe, Tom Robbins

[First Pre-view ever of Craig King's new documentary work in progress. 'Here We Grow' – a documentary on the food industry.]

 

The food documentary, 'Here We Grow', was born out of one man's desire to break the limitations of the retail food world and to help change the way people think about food and wellness. The documentary intends to explore the state of our food supply and help educate people to live healthier, more wholesome lives through socially responsible food choices. The film is intended to raise awareness nationwide through inspirational interviews and stories that will capture the passion and drive of a diverse group of individuals.

 

http://www.whataboutme.tv

Becoming What You Abhor: The Lesson Learned from "The Family"

- for the Grateful Web

Recently, eleven members of a group known as "The Family", who are in fact an extremist faction of both the Earth Liberation Front (ELF) and the Animal Liberation Front (ALF), were indicted on 65 charges, all related to "eco-terrorist" attacks that were carried out over four and a half years and spanned five states.

While it is easy for most of us to empathize with their concern for the environment and animals, and their discouragement and outrage at how little the masses of society care about these concerns, it is harder to understand what they thought they were accomplishing with their violent attacks.  If their goal was to help further world peace on all levels (ecologically, spiritually, physically, etc…), isn't it counterintuitive to destroy, blow up, vandalize or otherwise harm anything?  As the consummately wise Gandhi believed, we cannot achieve peace through violent means.  It may be easy to think that we must shock or jolt people out of their complacency to make any change in the world, but change is usually not something that comes about in one moment of epiphany.  Usually, it is a series of gradual changes that take place over time.  Unfortunately, when someone uses violence, even if it's to highlight an important injustice or wrong that is happening in society, they then relinquish their right to speak for positive change as they've become part of the problem.  Michael Franti, of the group Spearhead, ask the all-important question in one of his songs, "Are we part of the solution, or are we part the pollution?"

However, the tone and words that officials in the U.S. government have used to condemn these acts strike me as the epitome of hypocrisy.  Although the technical definition of terrorism, according to the American Heritage dictionary, is "the unlawful use or threatened use of force or violence by a person or an organized group against people or property with the intention of intimidating or coercing societies or governments, often for ideological or political reasons," I would like to propose a change in that definition.  Even though most can justify war as lawful and necessary, aren't the bombs we're dropping, the guns we're shooting and the sanctions we've imposed intended to intimidate and coerce societies?  And aren't the majority of these people innocent of any wrongdoing, but unfortunately happen to be in the wrong place at the terribly wrong time?

As the Bible so clearly advises us all, don't point out the speck of wood in another's eye when you have a log in your own.  It also warns:  "Judge not, lest you be judged."

Henry J Hansen for the Grateful Web