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First Aid Kit Head Into The Studio With Producer Mike Mogis

First Aid Kid - the Swedish duo of sisters Klara and Johanna Söderberg - are currently recording with acclaimed producer Mike Mogis at his ARC Studios in Omaha, NE.They'll spend the next month working on the follow-up to their highly praised debut album, The Big Black & The Blue, released last year on Wichita Recordings. In addition to being known as a member of Bright Eyes and Monsters Of Folk, Mogis is a renowned producer who has worked with artists including The Concretes, Cursive, Lightspeed Champion, Rilo Kiley, Sea Wolf, and Pete Yorn, among many others.

"We met Mike at Austin City Limits last year. He saw our show there and we got talking about recording an album together," said Klara and Johanna. "Bright Eyes was the band that got us inspired to start making music, so working with Mike is quite surreal for us. We feel honored. So far things are going really well and we believe we're in the process of creating something very special. This truly is a dream come true."

First Aid Kit broke out last year with the release of The Big Black & The Blue, garnering praise from AOL Music's Spinner blog, NPR's All Songs Considered, Nylon, and SPIN ('Breaking Out' artist), among others, and earning spots on HearYa, Nylon, and PasteMagazine.com's 'Best of 2010' lists. The year proved to be one of 'firsts' for the young band, who were only 17 (Klara) and 19-years old (Johanna) at the time of the album's release.

March 2010 saw First Aid Kit perform in the US for the first time at SXSW, which they followed with their first stateside headlining tour in June that included a sold-out stop at New York's Mercury Lounge. In September, they toured Australia and released a 7-inch single for album standout "Ghost Town," which featured a spectral cover of Fever Ray's "When I Grow Up" as a B-side in tribute to mentor Karin Dreijer Andersson (Fever Ray, The Knife), whose label Rabid released their debut EP Drunken Trees in 2008. First Aid Kit returned to tour the US again in October, with stops at the Austin City Limits festival and the CMJ Music Marathon (featuring a second sold-out NYC show at Joe's Pub).

The band rang in 2011 with the January release of a Third Man Records Blue Series 7-inch that featured covers of Buffy Sainte-Marie's "Universal Soldier" (made famous in 1965 by Donovan) and the classic blues standard "It Hurts Me Too" (a song much loved by fans of Karen Dalton's 1969 folk-blues version), recorded with Jack White at his own Third Man Studios in Nashville, TN.

Chilly Gonzales Announces World’s First Orchestral Rap Album

Chilly Gonzales, never one to stay quiet for too long, is back with the announcement of his new album, The Unspeakable Chilly Gonzales, the world’s first all-orchestral rap album, the dramatic next step after piano-rap classics like “The Grudge” and “Crying” from his last album, Ivory Tower. The Unspeakable Chilly Gonzales will see a digital release on June 7th via Canadian tastemaker label Arts & Crafts. Gonz is giving the world a sneak preview of the ambitious album, in the form of an orchestral-rap medley, which you can download above.

Today, he brings some “Gonzpiration” to the rap game. Accompanied by Hollywood swells, tympani rolls, noble French horns, hypnotizing bells and influenced by Prokofiev, Morricone and Phillip Glass, this record is Chilly Gonzales’ professional confessional, revealing more of himself on these monologues than ever before. The arrangements found on The Unspeakable Chilly Gonzales were done by his Hollywood-film composing brother Christophe Beck, and take center stage alongside Gonzo’s eccentric personality.

After his Guinness World Record and the Locarno film festival prize-winning feature film (and accompany album) Ivory Tower, the single “Never Stop” was chosen by Apple for their iPad ad. Ivory Tower’s inter-planetary video hit “You Can Dance” helped bring the musical genius to the forefront of American culture.

Download “The Unspeakable Chilly Gonzales” Medley MP3 HERE!

Morning Teleportation on Letterman Wed | 5/4/11

Morning Teleportation will bring their roller coaster of tumultuous rock 'n' roll and deep-space pickin' 'n' grinnin to The Late Show With David Letterman on Wednesday, May 4th, marking the band's network television debut. The band will perform the title track off of their debut album, "Expanding Anyway" which was recently released on Glacial Pace Recordings and was produced by label owner Isaac Brock along with Clay Jones.


The album has received rave reviews from the NY Times to SPIN. "Yelping and shouting like a genuine mental case, frontman Tiger Merritt rides a joyously chaotic wave on [the band's] debut," writes Jon Young in SPIN's album review, featured in their April issue. "Morning Teleportation possess their own wacky identity, lurching from avant-garde mischief to pop operatics to folk sweetness." Curious fans can head on over to SPIN.com for an exclusive full album listen by clicking here


This week also marks the band's debut at MTVU as part of their new artists show "The Freshmen." The show spotlights emerging artists on air and online, with the chance for one of the videos to get an automatic add into rotation on the channel the following week. Fans can vote for Morning Teleportation's video for "Expanding Anyway" by clicking all this week. Voting will end on Friday May 6th at 2:00pm EST.


The video for "Expanding Anyway" is a modern psychedilc experience created by Phantasmic, a small and unique visual duo consisting of Tripp and Jenna Watt. Phantasmic hand-crafted every aspect of the project which began with an original list of over 170 different ideas that resulted in 31 final scenes, ranging from watercolor paintings to Crayola marker creatures, acting in tights to choreographed dance numbers.  You can check out the Making Of Video as well the director's cut of the final video.

Morning Teleportation takes their critically acclaimed live show back out on the road on May 18th and will continue to tour throughout the summer. NPR recently selected the band as a must-see in their SXSW preview noting, "It's got this great burst of energy in the vocals, real cacophonous psychedelia." While Jon Pareles of the New York Times wrote about the band's live show last year saying, "Morning Teleportation, from Portland, Ore., crammed ideas into songs that leaped impatiently, and gleefully, from style to style." Pareles also recently reviewed the band's debut album noting, "Euphoria and transformation run through Morning Teleportation's debut album, "Expanding Anyway" (Glacial Pace), which puts neat, strategic structure behind its giddy psychedelic cheer."

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Following are the latest confirmed dates for Morning Teleportation...stay tuned for additional dates:

May 18 - Los Angeles, CA - Royce Hall (UCLA) - supporting Thao with The Get Down Stay Down

May 19 - Visalia, CA - The Cellar Door

May 20 - Sacramento, CA - Blue Lamp

May 21 - Fresno, CA - Fulton 55

May 25 - Los Angeles, CA - The Satellite - with Jaill

May 26 - San Francisco, CA - Brick and Mortar Music Hall - with Jaill

May 27 - Reno, NV - Tonic Lounge

May 28 - Salt Lake City, UT - The Woodshed

May 31 - Omaha, NE - The Waiting Room Lounge - supporting The Thermals

Jun 1 - Columbia, MO - Mojo's - supporting The Thermals

Jun 2 - Cincinnati, OH - MOTR Pub

Jun 4 - Northampton, MA - Iron Horse

Jun 5 - Hunter, NY - Mountain Jam

Jul 2 - Quincy, CA - High Sierra Music Festival

Jul 3 - Quincy, CA - High Sierra Music Festival

Jul 24 - Omaha, NE - The Waiting Room Lounge - with Colourmusic

Jul 26 - Minneapolis, MN - 7th St. Entry - with Colourmusic

Jul 27 - Des Moines, IA - Vaudeville Mews - with Colourmusic

Jul 28 - Iowa City, IA - The Mill - with Colourmusic

Jul 29 - Chicago, IL - Subterranean - with Colourmusic

Jul 30 - St. Louis, MO - Off Broadway - with Colourmusic

July 31 - Lawrence, KS - Jackpot - with Colourmusic

Aug 3 - Morrison, CO - Red Rocks Amphitheatre - supporting The Flaming Lips and Primus

Austin Indie Singer Suzanna Choffel To Release New Album

Suzanna Choffel, whose dusky vocals are as intriguing as her indie-soul-pop originals and sultry stage presence, releases on Tuesday, May 24, her latest album, STEADY EYE SHAKY BOW, a collection of upbeat melodies and ballads that Choffel describes as “blues-colored dark grit” drawing from musical influences that include Stax-style jazz and Motown R&B.

Choffel and her band — Kyle Thompson on drums, Johnny Vogelsang on bass, Laura Scarborough on vibraphone and synthesizer, and Chris Gebhard on keys and guitar —will make numerous special appearances around the new release. The band recently performed at SXSW Music Festival, including a show at Auditorium Shores with Blue October.

Around the release of STEADY EYE SHAKY BOW Choffel will tour in Texas in May and June, including an Album Release Show in Austin. The album has already yielded “Raincloud,” with its smart, witty lyrics and soulful syncopated sound that is more than pop, the song infused with the flavor of New Orleans with the backing by Big Sam’s Funky Nation, and a video viewed on YouTube more than half a million times.
Another song on the new album is “Archer,” from whence the album’s title comes, a song that exemplifies Choffel’s unique lyrical expression of the emotions inherent in relationships.
Multiple award-winner Choffel was named Indie Artist of the Year at the 2009 Austin Music Awards and won top honors in the John Lennon Songwriting Contest.
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Suzanna Choffel upcoming shows include:
May 13, Saxon Pub, Austin
May 19, The Shady Grove, Austin
May 20, Luna, San Antonio
May 24, Waterloo Records In-Store, Austin
May 28, One World Theatre, Austin (Album Release Show)
June 11, McGonigel’s Mucky Duck, Houston
June 16, Buddy Holly Center, Lubbock

Callers Announce 2011 US Summer Tour

Ryan and Sara met Don at a show at Melvin's, a bar on St. Claude in the Marigny neighborhood of New Orleans. Ryan and Sara had just begun writing and recording songs together on an old 4-track with a mic hanging from the blade of a ceiling fan in the middle of that stifling sweaty summer, but they would soon part ways and leave New Orleans. Over the next couple of years they relocated to Providence together and later settled in Brooklyn where Don had also settled after Katrina.
Life of Love is the first collection of songs Callers wrote and recorded exclusively in New York as a three- piece. Naturally the band's sound grew in volume in response to the volume of the city; however, they held on to what makes them so consistently affecting: their raw spartan style, anchored by Sara's sensually tough vocals, and Ryan and Don's Southern-honed chops as multi-instrumentalists.
The album started with the band's cover of Wire's "Heartbeat", and the idea of creating something simple and cathartic. Using borrowed amps and mics, in bedrooms and in studios, and by the grace of their good friends, Callers recorded Life of Love in intense spurts over the course of a year. Unlike the experimental ballads on their debut Fortune, the new songs pulse with gritty urgency, colored by the sounds of damaged gear and the earnest spirit of a middle-school gospel choir. The result is an album stripped to the core, an expression of the inexpressible space between us and the places we inhabit and the people we share those places with.
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US Tour Dates
6/4 - Music Hall of Williamsburg - Brooklyn, NY ^&
7/6 - Club Passim - Cambridge, MA
7/7 - One Longfellow Square - Portland, ME
7/8 - Casa Del Popolo - Montreal, QC
7/9 - Cisco Systems Bluesfest - Ottawa, ON
7/10 - The Monkey House - Winooski, VT
7/23 - Hillside Festival - Guelph, ON
7/24 - Beachland Tavern - Cleveland, OH%
7/26 - Brillobox - Pittsburgh, PA%
7/27 - Metro Gallery - Baltimore, MD
7/28 - World Cafe Live Upstairs - Philadelphia, PA%

^ Yellow Ostrich

& Wildbirds & Peacedrums

% Nat Baldwin

Paul Brady's 'Hooba Dooba' Streets 5/24

The career of Paul Brady — whose 12th solo album, the exuberantly titled Hooba Dooba, gets its U.S. release on May 24, 2011 via Proper American — is not that of your usual singer/songwriter. And the new record is the most wildly eclectic this man for all seasons has yet recorded. “I’m a marketing department’s nightmare,” he jokes, before discussing the confusion that has surrounded him for so long.

“I don’t really fit any of the recognized models for artists,” he acknowledges. “That has to do with my musical background, the variety of my tastes and the fact that I’ve jumped from place to place in my career. But at the same time, I’ve never found a compelling reason to narrow my perspective on the music I love by making a record that is only a small bit of what I am. I love big, romantic ballads, screamin’ blues songs, folk songs, country tunes. All these things have been hard to put into one box and say what it is, and I suppose I’ve suffered from that to a degree. But that’s what I am, and my fans are into me because of that — they’re the kind of people who resist marketing strategies, who like to discover things themselves. They respond to the sound of a voice, which says something to them on a subliminal level emotionally, rather than falling for some image.”
In 1963, five years after picking up his first guitar at age 11 and playing along with Shadows and Ventures records, the young Irishman snagged his first paying gig tinkling the ivories in a Donegal hotel, marking the beginning of 48 uninterrupted years of making music — all kinds of music. Like so many of his contemporaries on that side of the pond, he spent a chunk of the ’60s cranking up the volume in R&B bands before making a radical shift into Irish folk music, working with the Johnstons and Planxty, in collaboration with Andy Irvine and on his own, interpreting traditional songs. In the late ’70s, now married and with two kids on the way, he dedicated himself to writing his own material, inspired in part by the music of Gerry Rafferty, another folk artist who’d remade himself as an eloquent singer/songwriter. Hard Station, Brady’s 1981 solo debut album, containing the first fruit of his labors, returned him to the realm of rock and pop, and he scored his first big cover a year later when Hard Station’s “Night Hunting Time” wound up on Santana’s million-selling Shango, to its author’s surprise and delight.
Brady spent the next two decades leading a double life as a recording artist making a sustained effort to get on the radar and a much-covered songwriter, a number of his songs made famous by singers far better known than himself. These included such high-profile covers as Bonnie Raitt’s memorable, multiple-Grammy-winning rendition of “Luck of the Draw” (1991) and Brooks & Dunn’s chart-topping country single “The Long Goodbye” (2001). Around the turn of the century, the multitalented veteran once again reinvented himself, this time as a self-contained, truly independent artist. Since this latest metamorphosis, he’s been touring constantly in small-group settings on both sides of the Atlantic and making records whenever he felt inspired to do so. Which brings us back full circle to Hooba Dooba, its multiple facets glinting like an uncut diamond nestled in a field of shamrocks.
Brady describes “The Winners’ Ball,” propelled by a springy, soulful groove, as “a tongue-and-cheek look at the excesses of the modern end of music,” while “Rainbow” is a lush, widescreen ballad that begs for a country cover, though Brady insists that it’s closer to Memphis than Nashville. “The Price of Fame” builds to a string-laden crescendo in the grand manner of vintage Elton John, and the following “One More Today” sounds like some just-discovered Tin Pan Alley standard.
The album’s most dramatic segue takes the listener from the earthy, rollicking “Follow That Star” to the heart-wrenching “Mother and Son.” “I do like slapping people in the face, figuratively, with an emotional change,” Brady explains. “‘Follow That Star’ comes out of a genre that I have always loved, raw, acoustic blues — anything from Lead Belly to Mississippi John Hurt to ’60s British blues of Winwood, Beck and Clapton. ‘Mother and Son’ is a song about my relationship with my mother. It’s a song that I was trying to write for many years, but only managed to finish it after she passed on.”
The album also contains his first-ever recording of “Luck of the Draw,” the only song here not of recent vintage — apart, that is, from its lone non-original, a sublime, irresistible rendering of “You Won’t See Me” from Rubber Soul. “I wrote ‘Luck of the Draw’ when I was making the Trick or Treat album in L.A. back in 1990, and that’s when Bonnie Raitt picked up on it. I’d always wanted to record it because I had a very different take from the way Bonnie did it, but I decided to leave it alone for a respectable amount of time after hers was current. That was a long time ago, obviously, and it seemed like the right time to do it.” Good move — Brady’s take is so unlike Raitt’s familiar one as to be virtually unrecognizable, providing the song with an edgy, vital second life.
When asked why he decided to title the album Hooba Dooba, Brady replies, “It’s a phrase I’ve used many times in situations when something takes me by surprise that’s pleasurable. In this case, I was in the art department with the designer who was working on the cover looking through various ideas, and when he showed me the image that eventually became the cover, I looked at it and went, “Hooba dooba.” He said, ‘Is that the album title?’ and when I told him no, he said, ‘Well it should be.’ And I decided he was right. Nothing more profound than that.”
Given Brady’s back story, it’s hard to say whether Hooba Dooba — which features guests Jerry Douglas on lap steel and Sarah Siskind on backing vocals — will clear up the confusion about just who this multifaceted guy is or add to it, but one thing’s for sure: this record is a dead-honest picture of a one-of-a-kind artist who has always been absolutely true to himself.

“I’ve been in this business over 40 years, and I’m a survivor,” says Brady with unconcealed pride. “I’ve been through plenty of ups and downs, and I know what the business is. I have a broad enough base in terms of my activities to have survived for this long and to still be enjoying what I’m doing. Anything above and beyond that is icing on the cake.” He pauses for a moment, his face lighting up in a smile. “And the cake is okay.”

David Bromberg's USE ME Tapes Friends

When David Bromberg, one of America’s finest roots musicians, emerged from a recording hiatus of 17 years with the solo, acoustic, traditional folk-blues album Try Me One More Time (Appleseed, 2007), fans and critics were thrilled, and the CD was rewarded with a Grammy nomination. For his follow-up album, Use Me, Bromberg chose a different approach: Why not ask some of his favorite singer-songwriters and musicians to write (or choose), produce, and perform on songs tailored to his versatile but distinctive skills as a guitarist and vocalist?

Answering David’s call were well-known artists from the many genres comprising the amorphous “Americana” musical category. Representing contemporary rootsy singer-songwriters: John Hiatt, the first musician Bromberg approached, who penned the pensive “Ride On Out a Ways” for him; for New Orleans “fonk,” Dr. John; there’s three-guitar jam band interplay with Widespread Panic and jug band music with Levon Helm (the sprightly “Bring It With You When You Come,” produced by Grammy-winning Larry Campbell). Linda Ronstadt puts in a rare appearance on a soulful Brook Benton ballad, Los Lobos contribute a Mexican-flavored waltz, Vince Gill and Tim O’Brien take care of the country and bluegrass quotient, Keb’ Mo’ brings the blues, and the hitmaking Butcher Brothers, producers Phil and Joe Nicolo (Bob Dylan, John Lennon, Cypress Hill, Nine Inch Nails), provide the languid R&B groove for the title song, a cover of Bill Withers’ classic “Use Me.”

The resultant album is due for July 12, 2011 release on Appleseed Records. A national tour will ensue.
Standout tracks change with each listening, but some of the high points include the crisp blues shuffle “Tongue,” the album’s lone Bromberg original, with Levon Helm on drums; “You Don’t Wanna Make Me Mad,” featuring David on slide guitar and Dr. John on piano; the ominous slow blues “Diggin’ in the Deep Blue Sea,” updated by Keb’ Mo’ and Gary Nicholson from Larry Davis’ “Texas Flood” to address the dangers of offshore drilling, and the chipper Vince Gill — Guy Clark co-write “Lookout Mountain Girl,” the only song on which David cedes most of the lead guitar duties (to Vince, although David splits the lead with Widespread Panic’s Jimmy Herring on “Old Neighborhood”).
Rather than collating individual instrumental parts literally phoned in to a central location, the recording sessions for Use Me generally took place on each guest artist’s home turf — in Woodstock (Levon Helm), New Orleans (Dr. John), Nashville (John Hiatt, Tim O’Brien, Vince Gill), Los Angeles (Los Lobos), and so on, to retain their regional flavors. For Bromberg, who started his professional career as an accompanist for everyone from Dion and Jay and the Americans to Bob Dylan and Willie Nelson, the sessions were simultaneously a throwback to his sideman days and a sidestep from his own recordings. “As artist and producer, I get to completely mold my vision of how the song should go,” he explains. “The drawback is that I don’t get many ideas that are not my own. It was fascinating for me to see the different approaches that everyone used in production.”
No matter who the producers, songwriters or accompanying musicians are on Use Me, Bromberg’s expressive guitar-playing and “rippling Fred Neil-like baritone that . . . brings warm, reassuring comfort” (Rolling Stone) remain the centerpiece of the CD, diamonds in golden settings.
Born in Philadelphia in 1945 and raised in Tarrytown, NY, “I listened to rock ’n’ roll and whatever else was on the radio,” says Bromberg. “I discovered Pete Seeger and The Weavers and, through them, Reverend Gary Davis. I then discovered Big Bill Broonzy, who led me to Muddy Waters and the Chicago blues. This was more or less the same time I discovered Flatt and Scruggs, which led to Bill Monroe and Doc Watson.”
Bromberg began studying guitar when he was 13 and eventually enrolled in Columbia University as a musicology major. The call of the Greenwich Village folk scene in the mid-’60s drew David to the downtown clubs and coffeehouses, where he could watch and learn from the best performers, including primary sources such as his inspiration and teacher, the Reverend Gary Davis.
Bromberg’s sensitive, blues-based approach to guitar-playing earned him jobs playing the Village “basket houses” for tips, the occasional paying gig, and lots of employment as a backing musician for Tom Paxton, Jerry Jeff Walker and Rosalie Sorrels, among others. He became a first-call, “hired gun” guitarist for recording sessions, playing on hundreds of records by artists including Bob Dylan (New Morning, Self Portrait, Dylan), Link Wray, The Eagles, Ringo Starr, Willie Nelson and Carly Simon. In the early ’90s, David produced an as-yet-unreleased Dylan album, although two tracks have been issued as part of Dylan’s “Bootleg Series.”
An unexpected and wildly successful solo spot at the 1970 Isle of Wight Festival in Great Britain led to a solo deal with Columbia Records, for whom David recorded four albums. His eponymous 1971 debut included the mock-anguished “Suffer To Sing the Blues,” a Bromberg original that became an FM radio staple, and “The Holdup,” a songwriting collaboration with former Beatle George Harrison on which Harrison also played slide guitar. David, who had met the Grateful Dead’s Jerry Garcia at the Woodstock Festival when they both took refuge from the rain in a tepee, wound up with four Dead members, including Garcia, playing on his next two albums.
Bromberg’s range of material, based in the folk and blues idioms, continually expanded with each new album to encompass bluegrass, ragtime, country and ethnic music, and his touring band grew apace. By the mid-’70s, the David Bromberg Big Band included horn-players, a fiddler, and several multi-instrumentalists, including David himself. Among the best-known Bromberg Band graduates: mandolinist Andy Statman, later a major figure in the Klezmer music movement in America, and fiddler Jay Ungar (who wrote the memorable “Ashokan Farewell” for Ken Burns’ PBS documentary, “The Civil War”).
Despite jubilant, loose-limbed concerts and a string of acclaimed albums on the Fantasy label, Bromberg found himself exhausted by the logistics of the music business. “I decided to change the direction of my life,” he explains. So David dissolved his band in 1980, and he and his artist/musician wife, Nancy Josephson, moved from Northern California to Chicago, where David attended the Kenneth Warren School of Violin Making. Though he still toured periodically, the recordings slowed to a trickle and then stopped.
After “too many Chicago winters,” in 2002 David and Nancy moved to Wilmington, Del., where they currently serve as unofficial “artists in residence” and where David established David Bromberg Fine Violins, a retail store and repair shop for high quality instruments. Frequent participation in the city’s weekly jam sessions helped rekindle Bromberg’s desire to perform music “live” again, and the encouragement of fellow musicians Chris Hillman (The Byrds, Desert Rose Band, Flying Burrito Brothers) and bluegrass wizard Herb Pedersen helped nudge him back into the recording studio. The Wilmington jams also led to the formation of Angel Band, fronted by Nancy and two other female vocalists, with David frequently serving as an accompanist.
Bromberg’s participation in his local and musical community has subsequently included a fund-raising music festival (Bromberg’s Big Noise in the Neighborhood) to help renovate a local theater, and a keynote address at this past spring’s Folk Alliance International convention, a non-profit organization of musicians, concert presenters and industry professionals.
David continues his musical revitalization with projects like Use Me, playing solo shows or backed by his own bluegrass quartet and reunions of the David Bromberg Big Band. Use your ears and catch him when you can!

Disco Biscuits Launches New Website & Video

Check out the ALL NEW discobiscuits.com featuring a new studio video by The Disco Biscuits' friend Jesse Borrell from their upcoming album "Otherwise Law Abiding Citizens" which will be out this summer.

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VIDEO CREDIT:

The Studio 4 recording sessions for "Otherwise Law Abiding Citizens" were fully documented by filmmaker Jesse R. Borrell of NoCoast.TV, and they plan to release a series of 4 documentaries detailing the album's creation in the coming weeks.

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Check out some more Biscuits coverage on The Grateful Web, including a recent with Marc Brownstein, festival and concert reviews from: Bisco Inferno, Gothic Theater, Jam on the River, Wakarusa, Ogden Theater, Tatanka fest., with STS9 and more.

Younger Brother Release Vaccine Today

Vaccine (released April 26, 2011/ SCI Fidelity Records) is the third album by genre-bending U.K. outfit Younger Brother. And while members Simon Posford, Benji Vaughan and Ruu Campbell remain royalty on the electronic music scene, (the album reached #2 on iTunes’ electronic music chart), Vaccine marks a notable evolution from the band's electronic origins, embracing melodic song structures and organic instrumental sounds. The result is turning heads, and ears

Check out a rare acoustic Younger Brother performance here.

Vaccine’s nine original songs incorporate elements of catchy uber-pop, early American folk and blues, and vintage prog-rock, with lyrics that balance pointed humor and weighty philosophical matters, giving the album a level of intimacy and emotion that's not normally associated with electronic music. The release continues Younger Brother's evolution from studio project to full-fledged, organic band, with Posford, Vaughan and Campbell joined by Marc Brownstein (Disco Biscuits) on bass, Tom Hamilton (Brothers Past) on guitar and Joe Russo (who also plays in the Grateful Dead spin-off act Furthur) on drums.

The U.S. release of Vaccine coincides with Simon Posford’s other current project: the highly anticipated “Shpongle presents The Shpongletron Experience.” For this massive run of Shpongle “Hybrid” DJ dates, Posford reveals his brand-new "Decks, FX & 101" show made up of an arsenal of turntables, synths, and effects units. The elaborately staged multi-media presentation, which Posford describes as a "maelstrom of beauty and surprise," will raise the bar on Shpongle's longstanding reputation for providing mind-bending, fully immersive multi-dimensional, multi-sensory experiences.

Visit www.facebook.com/shpongle for tour dates and additional information.

Poly Styrene 1957-2011

We can confirm that the beautiful Poly Styrene, who has been a true fighter,  won her battle on Monday evening (4/25/11)  to go to higher places. Poly Styrene was born Marianne Elliot Said on June 3, 1957. She passed away due to cancer.

Poly Styrene was a punk amongst punks. A groundbreaking presence that left an unrepeatable mark on the musical landscape, she made history the moment she uttered, “Some people think little girls should be seen and not heard but I think oh bondage up yours!” The influence of Poly and X-ray Spex has been felt far and wide ever since. The seminal album Germ Free Adolescents is a landmark work and a primary influence on Britpop and Riot Grrrl. At the center of it was Poly Styrene, a bi-racial feminist punk with the perfect voice to soundtrack rebellion. Poly never sacrificed the intelligence or the fun in her music and style. Her trademark braces and dayglo clothes were a playful rejection of the status quo and of conformity and complacency. She dissected gender politics, consumer culture, and the obsessions of modern life in a way that made us all want sing along with her.

At the core of Poly’s work from Germ Free Adolescents through Generation Indigo, is a revolutionary with a genuine love for this world and the people and things in it. Her indomitable heart is all over the new material from her championing of cruelty free products and as she put it, "being conscious of the slaughterhouse culture" (“I Luv Ur Sneakers”) to giving voice to marginalized poor people worldwide (“No Rockefeller”) to tackling racism (“Colour Blind”). Poly Styrene never stopped exciting us with her incisive world-view, amazing wit, and her adventurous sound. It is impossible to imagine what modern music would be like without her incalculable contributions but it’s probably not worth imagining a world that never had Poly Styrene in it.

A thrilling work from a true pioneer and rebel in every sense, Poly Styrene’s album Generation Indigo is out today through Future Noise Music and was produced by Youth (The Verve, Killing Joke, The Fireman, Edwyn Collins).The album’s fusion of punk spirit, and fresh sounds has already received rave reviews on both sides of the Atlantic from Spin, NPR, NME, MOJO and countless others. The forward looking Generation Indigo showcases Poly’s humorous musings on pop culture, the internet and fashion whilst also tackling heavier subject matter (war and racism) with her politically aware and intelligent lyrics all in the inimitable voice of a genuine icon. Listen to the full Generation Indigo record streaming on AOL Spinner.