Turbine and Mason Jar Records team up for live release Sounds in the Hall

Breaking through the proverbial glass ceiling of the improvisational rock scene proves no easy feat for young bands. Burgeoning musicians lumped in the dare we say it, jamband realm, need to successfully marry a deep high-quality catalog of material, whimsical stage presence, diverse writing chops, virtuoso instrumentation, and a calendar containing upwards of 200 shows per year. Correction, breaking through the glass ceiling of the improvisational rock scene is damn near impossible.

But that doesn’t mean it doesn’t happen, and Brooklyn’s Turbine would like to submit their CV. On their first official live release, Sounds in the Hall, as they have over the course of 8 songs checked off every single one of the preceding prerequisites. Comprised of carefully hand-picked selections of both Turbine classics and newer material, Sounds in the Hall covers all the bases, but the clear differentiating factor that sets Turbine far above the masses is their amazing penchant for writing memorable and distinctive songs across a variety of sounds and genres.

Just running through the eight song track list, Turbine touches on a bonafide hit-single in waiting “Blackout Song,” the slow summer groove akin to the Grateful Dead “Eddy From the Sea,” a thick extended funk jam on “Behind These Walls” that stretches all way to cow funk-era 1997, blazing bluegrass chops on Maritime Rag, and a handful of tunes that highlight the remarkable vocals and smoking harmonica leads.

Having played a seemingly infinite number of shows over the past couple of years, the Turbine boys took a lot of time in selecting their finest renditions of the material on Sound from the Halls, as described by guitarist and harmonica player Ryan Rightmire.

“There were so many factors in selecting the songs. Being that this is our first official live album, we wanted to include songs from our two studio albums as well as feature some unreleased ones. In the end, half the album is made up of unreleased tracks. Listening back to the performances, it was hard to ignore the energy of the big shows. Bonnaroo and the Telluride Bluegrass Festival brought out some great moments, so they are well represented. As for a specific memory, at one point during “Stand Down” I played the harmonica with a balloon, and you can hear the crowd erupt mid-song. It’s those mid-song responses that always tell us things are going well.”

It bears highlighting that Turbine’s Ryan Rightmire incorporates the harmonica like it’s never been used in a rock context. Not only does he employ some trickery like playing with a balloon, but it’s not uncommon to hear him layer on some effects and turn his harp into a synth-laden rhythm instrument. Alternatively, he possesses to chops to play it clean and go toe-to-toe with John Popper and perhaps remain the last man standing. While it’s probably not wise for the bands’ publicity to start entering them into fights, these guys are pretty scrappy so keep your guard up, Popper.

Turbine is by no means any one trick pony either, guitarist Jeremy Hilliard plays law-running lead guitar and cranks out definitive melodies throughout  his lead playing as well as helping shape Turbine’s wide reaching sound with his song-writing talents. Bassist Justin Kimmel and drummer Octavio Salman hold down the low post like Abdul-Jabar, as both are trained musicians with the ability to run the offense and take over the game at any moment.

Sometimes these things just feel meant to be; when Turbine showed up to perform their show at Bonnaroo, from which three of these tracks were taken, they found a bit of encouraging irony. “There was a giant wind turbine spinning next to the stage. As of matter of fact, it powered our entire show including all of the recording equipment. We made the announcement that this was the first turbine-powered Turbine concert. I kept expecting the songs to speed up every time a gust of wind made it spin faster.”

Taking the name from the lyrics of one the album’s highlight tracks, “Behind These Walls,” Sounds in the Hall evokes a sense of the live experience the overall feel for this tour, which included some big venues. We can only hope that with the help of a successfully release, that the halls will keep growing and the sounds will just keep getting better.

In support of the album, Turbine will host a record release party on May 22nd at the Mercury Lounge in New York City (with the Brew).

Listen to Turbine sing "Blackout Song"

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Sounds in the Hall Tracklist:

Eddy the Sea – Telluride Bluegrass Festival, CO

War of 9161 (The Pledge) – Breckenridge, CO

Invited – Bonnaroo, TN

Behind These Walls – Boulder, CO

Doing to Me – Bonnaroo, TN

Stand Down – Bonnaroo, TN

Maritime Rag – Telluride Bluegrass Festival, CO

Blackout Song – Breckenridge, CO

Black Seeds + Katchafire @ The Fox Theatre

Originating from Wellington, New Zealand, The Black Seeds have carved out their reputation through platinum selling albums, a masterful 8-piece live show, and a unique sound that fuses infectious grooves and melodies with undiluted roots music. With numerous European festival tours and releases behind them, and a successful 2009 North American release, their following continues to spread quickly around the globe.

Led by the vocals of Barnaby Weir and Daniel Weetman, at its core The Black Seeds music is a boundary-crossing sound fusion of big-beat funk, dub, soul, and afro-beat, mixed with vintage roots-reggae. Described by Clash Magazine as ‘one of the best reggae acts on the planet’, their legendary 8-piece live show brings the raw energy and good vibes wherever it goes. They now have countless sell-out New Zealand and Australasian tours behind them, and regularly perform at many of Europe’s biggest festivals.
The Black Seeds manage to play beyond the normal boundaries of reggae without compromising the music’s heart. While “Rotten Apple” has all the thump of a vintage Parliament-Funkadelic jam , “Afrophone”’s punchy horns and get- on-the-good-foot rhythm recall James Brown and the J.B.s at their peak – and the Seeds manage to pull it all off while retaining their voice. They make the blend of sounds feel absolutely natural. This is not a reggae band dropping a nov- elty funk cover into the middle of a set, this is simply Black Seeds music.” - Jambase.com (U.S.A) – Nov. ‘09
Reggae is one of the bloodlines of New Zealand music -- which accounts for the extraordinary success of Hamilton's Katchafire who, emerged as the hardest working band in the country. Their astonishing debut album, the prophetically named Revival, sold in excess of 30,000 copies (double platinum). The success of the band was evident in album sales, opening shows for the likes of Michael Franti and Spearhead, gigs all across the country (three in one day on Waitangi Day 2004, in Hamilton, Manukau and Nelson), three tours to Australia and New Caledonia, and most recently a stadium-filling headlining show in Fiji.
From humble beginnings ‘jamming’ in a garage, Katchafire is a melting pot of unique members, including two generations of one family and diverse musical perspectives – yet this blend is exquisitely aligned with the essence of reggae which can be an expression of social and political persuasions, hardship and pain, relaxation and reflection. Dubbed New Zealand’s hardest working band by national media, Katchafire have now completed numerous national and seven international tours. The band has moved audiences around the globe with three tours in New Caledonia, one tour in each Fiji and Hawaii and 10 Australian tours.
Katchafire’s unique, proudly New Zealand reggae style envelopes cross-cultural and cros-generational audiences in the revitalising vibes of healing music, encouraging sing-alongs and regeneration of soul. The Katchafire flame continues to burn ever brighter and stronger.

Sat, July 10th, 9:00pm
BLACK SEEDS + KATCHAFIRE

Internet 24-7 at www.foxtheatre.com | Phone: During box office hours: 303.443.3399

The Mynabirds Announce Spring Tour, Album in Stores Now

With this week’s release of her debut album as The Mynabirds, Laura Burhenn has officially turned the page from her role as one half of Georgie James.  Following The Mynabirds’ acclaimed first single “Numbers Don’t Lie,” Laura is giving another taste of What We Lose In The Fire We Gain In The Flood (Saddle Creek) with the bouncy, kiss-off anthem “Let The Record Go.”  Download the track HERE and if you haven’t heard “Numbers” yet you can check it out HERE.  For the next week you can also stream the full album HERE on Saddle Creek’s website.  Catch Laura and her band live when they kick off their spring tour on April 30th, which includes dates opening for Josh Ritter.

What We Lose draws from the gospel, old soul, and rock n roll that Burhenn was raised on, and many of the lyrics are inspired by a Zen-like view of the themes of loss and recovery.  With a surprisingly husky voice, considering her small stature, Burhenn adorns her words with a rich and emotive tone.  In the studio, singer-songwriter/producer Richard Swift helped carry out Burhenn’s vision, resulting in an album packed with both subtle detail and immediate charm.

The album also includes some notable guest artists.  Tom Hnatow (These United States) played pedal steel, Nate Walcott (Bright Eyes) arranged the horns on the album and backing vocals were provided by Orenda Fink (Azure Ray) and engineer/producer AJ Mogis (Monsters of Folk, Cursive, Tilly and The Wall).

Listen to The Mynabirds' "Let the Record Go"

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The Mynabirds – Spring Tour 2010:

* = with Josh Ritter

4/30: Des Moines, IA, Vaudeville Mews

5/1: Omaha, NE, Slowdown

5/7: Minneapolis, MN, Cedar Cultural Center

6/1: Cleveland, OH, Beachland Tavern

6/2: Washington, DC, Black Cat

6/3: Brooklyn, NY, The Bell House

6/6: Chicago, IL, Do Division Festival

6/7: Chicago, IL, Empty Bottle

6/8: Iowa City, IA, The Mill

6/11: Birmingham, AL, WorkPlay Theatre *

6/12: Baton Rouge, LA, Manship Theatre *

6/14: Austin, TX, Antone's *

6/15: Dallas, TX, Granada *

BOSSABRASIL at Birdland | June 8th-12th

BOSSABRASIL returns to Birdland with the fabulous sounds of Brazil.  Launched in 2007,  it is a celebration of Bossa Nova and rhythms of Brazil, Produced by Pat Philips & Ettore Stratta, known for their hit Brazilian Productions. From Rio to New York City, Bossa Nova has seduced musicians and listeners alike with its innate sensuality, melding samba with jazz sensibilities.

EMILIO SANTIAGO, vocalist, soulful and sophisticated, from Rio De Janeiro, returns to Birdland by popular Demand joined by major composer/keyboardist, MARCOS VALLE, also from Rio. Santiago is an excellent interpreter of the samba/bossa nova sound and is considered one of Brazil’s most important romantic interpreters.  He has worked alongside other jazz greats such as Caetano Velosa, Joao Donato, and Azymuth and has garnered six platinum records, seven gold, and the important Sharp Prize in Brazil.

MARCOS VALLE is without doubt one of the major songwriters of Brazilian popular music with over 300  compositions and rankedin Brazil alongside legendary composers such as Irving Berlin, Burt Bacharach, and Leonard Bernstein.  His songs have been recorded by Sarah Vaughan, Dizzy Gillespie, Oscar Peterson, Ramsey Lewis, Dave Brubeck, Toots Thielemans, Joe Pass, Bebel Gilberto, Joe Willians, Sergio Mendes, Flora Purim, Joao Donato, Eliane Elias …and more. Valle has received a prestigious BMI Award in Brazil for “Samba de Verao”, a recognition only so far awarded to Antonio Carlos Jobim and Vinicius De Morais for “Girl From Ipanema”.His songbook consisting of his biggest successes included renowned singers Caetano Veloso, Maria Bethania, Chico Buarque and others.

EMILIO SANTIAGO and MARCOS VALLE will arrive from Rio to share their enormous talent at Birdland June 8-12 in a rare musical experience.  They will be accompanied by a top Band consisting of SERGIO BRANDAO on Bass – also serving as Music Director, ERNESTO SIMPSON on Piano, KLAUS MEULLER on Drums and CAFÉ on Percussion.  Join us at Birdland for a blend of samba, soul, romance, hip-grooving melodies, sophisticated and swinging!

DELTA Presents
BOSSABRASIL Festival
Starring
TWO LUMINARIES FROM BRAZIL
EMILIO SANTIAGO and MARCOS VALLE
June 8-12

-

BIRDLAND:  415 w. 44TH Street (bet. 8th and 9th Ave.) – Full Menu, Parking Nearby
Shows:  8:30 and 11:00 PM – Reservations 212 581-3080 and http://www.birdlandjazz.com/

National Jazz Museum in Harlem 2010 May Schedule

We invite you to join us at the National Jazz Museum in Harlem as we venture to the very birthplace of jazz, New Orleans, for a month-long focus on the Crescent City of today.

We take our Jazz for Curious Listeners theme, “Tuning into Tremé,” as an allusion to the critically acclaimed new HBO series, which itself is named after one of the oldest black neighborhoods in the United States. Curated by Larry Blumenfeld of the Wall Street Journal, this journey will encompass the gumbo of cultures and musics that make New Orleans so special while pointing the way to its post-Katrina future. The Saturday Panel on New Orleans will extend and elaborate this critical inquiry.

Our flagship discussion series, Harlem Speaks, begins with Harlem resident and master tenor saxophonist Wayne Escoffery, and ends with the veteran vibraphonist David Samuels, whose eclectic musical tastes will add spice to the conversation. Trumpet man Randy Sandke’s latest book is making waves in as a fresh and at times controversial look at race and economics in jazz history; he’ll share the whys and hows at Jazz for Curious Readers.

As always, we never just give you all talk and no play, so the instrumentalists will have their say on stage, as pianist Steven Schoenberg performs a solo concert for Harlem in the Himalayas and the NJMH All Stars blow their horns for dancers at Jazz at the Dwyer.

Mark your calendars today, tell some friends, don’t delay, so we can swing with you in May!

Monday, May 3, 2010

Jazz for Curious Readers
Randy Sandke
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Trumpeter/author Randy Sandke, author of Where the Light and the Dark Folks Meet: Race and the Mythology, Politics and Business of Jazz (Scarecrow Press, 2010), has performed at festivals, clubs, and concerts around the world and has recorded over twenty albums as a leader as well.

As a composer, Sandke has had pieces performed at Carnegie Hall, the 92nd St. YMCA, and Avery Fischer Hall at Lincoln Center. The Carnegie Hall Jazz Band performed six of his suites.

Tonight’s focus, however, is on Sandke’s literary achievement and insights.

Randy Sandke’s previous book, Harmony for a New Millennium, details a method of exploring non-tonal harmony in the context of both composition and improvisation. He has also written scholarly articles on jazz history for the Oxford Companion to Jazz and the Rutgers University Annual Review of Jazz Studies.

In his recently published work (see above) Sandke conjoins his experience as a working musician with his scholarship to produce a work that debunks many of the hoary myths surrounding the role of race in jazz history. In what promises to be an intriguing (and perhaps controversial) discussion, Sandke will explain his thesis and why he was inspired to write Where the Light and the Dark Folks Meet: Race and the Mythology, Politics and Business of Jazz.

Tuesday, May 4, 2010

Jazz for Curious Listeners
Tuning in to Tremé: Big Chiefs and Second Lines
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Set in New Orleans, David Simon's new HBO series “Treme” picks up three months after the floods that resulted from the levee failures after Hurricane Katrina. Culture, which in New Orleans means a tight braid of music, cuisine, dance, visual art, and street life, is the primary focus of the series, as indeed it was and is the defining element of the city's identity and its recovery. Familiar faces from Simon's actors' troupe show up as fictional cultural fixtures: Wendell Pierce (detective Bunk Moreland on The Wire) plays Antoine Batiste, a trombonist we first encounter subbing with the real-life Rebirth Brass Band. Clarke Peters (detective Lester Freamon on The Wire) plays the Mardi Gras Indian Chief Albert Lambreaux, chanting out some of his best lines while beating a tambourine. The true-life heroes of New Orleans jazz figure prominently too: In addition to Rebirth, the list of musicians making cameo appearances, often in performance, includes trumpeter Kermit Ruffins, saxophonist Donald Harrison, and Troy “Trombone Shorty” Andrews, and drummer Bob French.

These 90-minute conversations, led by writer Larry Blumenfeld, who has written extensively about New Orleans since the flood, will use the HBO series to frame a wide-ranging consideration of jazz culture in New Orleans and its role in recovery. Excerpts from the show will be screened, and special guests-musicians, participants in the series, and scholars-will join in the discussion.

In Sidney Bechet's memoir, Treat It Gentle, the late, great clarinetist's real grandfather is supplanted by Omar, a fictional figure based on a folk tale, all the better to convey stirring truths about the true origins of New Orleans jazz. Real and imagined intermingle pointedly in New Orleans, in all walks of life. What can the fiction of “Treme”-which is named for the “Tremé neighborhood in New Orleans, long a hothouse for jazz culture-tell is about the city's real culture before and since the flood?

In our first session we will see the manner in which “Treme” plugs directly into an indigenous culture that has served as a lifeline for a New Orleans still inching toward recovery. That lifeline is extended principally by traditional jazz and brass-band musicians; the Social Aid & Pleasure Club members that mount Sunday parades; and-perhaps the most mysterious and essential group of all-Mardi Gras Indians, who dress in elaborate feathered and beaded suits four times a year. We'll consider the roots, traditions and depictions of these culture-bearers and their connections to familiar music.

Thursday, May 6, 2010

Harlem Speaks
Wayne Escoffery, Saxophonist
6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Harlem resident Wayne Escoffery is one of the most talented rising stars and in-demand sidemen on tenor saxophone in jazz. Born in London, Escoffery grew up in New Haven, Connecticut, where he sang in a renowned local boy’s choir and began taking sax lessons. At 16 he attended JazzMobile in Harlem, and by his senior year in secondary school had met Jackie McLean at The Artist’s Collective in Hartford.
McLean gave Wayne a full scholarship to attend The Hartt School, where he graduated summa cum laude with a Bachelor's degree in Jazz Performance, and became known as one of McLean's prize pupils. He went on to attend and graduate from The Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz Performance at The New England Conservatory in Boston with a Masters degree.

Since then, he has performed with a plethora of internationally respected musicians and has become known for his beautiful sound, impressive technique and versatility. As well as performing with his quartet, his group Veneration and a collaborative group with vocalist (and wife) Carolyn Leonhart, Wayne Escoffery currently performs locally and tours internationally with Ben Riley's Monk Legacy Septet, The Tom Harrell Quintet, and The Mingus Big Band/Orchestra/Dynasty.

Friday, May 7, 2010

Harlem in the Himalayas

Steven Schoenberg
7:00pm
Location: Rubin Museum of Art
(150 West 17th Street)
$18 in advance | $20 at door |
For tickets: RMA Box Office
or call 212-620-5000 ext. 344

This solo piano performance marks Steven Schoenberg's first New York concert since the release of Steven Schoenberg Live: An Improvisational Journey. He’s a dynamic, award-winning composer/pianist whose talents cross into musical theater, classical compositions, film scoring, children's music, and solo improvisational piano performances. Schoenberg’s creativity as an improviser and composer shall be on full display as he spontaneously riffs on the Himalayan themes of the venue as well as the vibrations he picks up from the audience . . . so be a part of the experience!

Tuesday, May 11, 2010

Jazz for Curious Listeners
Tuning in to Tremé: Hymns, Dirges and Misdemeanors
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

We continue tracking the acclaimed HBO series, noting that New Orleans jazz has always drawn upon and served both the secular and the sacred, and has been an important element of community organization. Yet, in the wake of Katrina, the often-strained relationship between the musicians and the police, the city and its culture, were starkly revealed: A city known for its culture did not so warmly welcome that culture back. Curator Larry Blumenfeld invites you to join the examination of this tension, and its portrayal in the series.

Saturday, May 15, 2010

Saturday Panels
New Orleans
12:00 – 4:00pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Live music plus film and discussion about the Crescent City
New Orleans holds a special place in the history and mythos of the U.S.A. Its mix of southern, French, Spanish and African cultures, and a largely Catholic religious background—in a nation predominately Protestant—was a uniquely rich soil for the birth and early development of jazz. Today’s discussion will feature live music, film, recordings, and a lively discussion of the Crescent City from the 19th to the 21st centuries, when a post-Katrina New Orleans struggles to recover while maintaining its soul, style and dignity.

Tuesday, May 18, 2010

Jazz for Curious Listeners
Tuning in to Tremé: A Rhythm-and-Blues Intervention
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Following the current HBO series, we note that perhaps more so than in any other American city, New Orleans represents the blending of African rhythms and forms with European harmonies and musical sensibility to transform our ideas about music and seed ongoing innovation. Looking at that lineage-from Congo Square to Louis Armstrong, Fats Domino to the Nevilles, Wynton Marsalis to Lil Wayne-and as portrayed in the series, Larry Blumenfeld and our live audience will consider what that mixture means.

Thursday, May 20, 2010

Harlem Speaks
Dave Samuels, Vibraphonist
6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Veteran Dave Samuels is widely recognized for his fresh new sound and creative approach to both the vibraphone and marimba. Although he’s best known for work with his current ensemble, The Caribbean Jazz Project as well as for his long tenure with Spyro Gyra, Samuels has also worked with a broad scope of artists ranging from Gerry Mulligan, Oscar Peterson, Chet Baker, Stan Getz, Carla Bley and Pat Metheny to the Yellowjackets, Bruce Hornsby, and Frank Zappa.

Samuels has been performing and recording with his group The Caribbean Jazz Project for over a decade; their most recent CD, Afro Bop Alliance, garnered a Latin Grammy and was also nominated for a Grammy. Some of his other recording projects include Remembrances, a percussion recording that features a commissioned marimba concerto for chamber orchestra and soloist composed by Jeff Beal, and Double Image—the vibe-marimba duo consisting of Dave Samuels & David Friedman—which is celebrating thirty years of performances. Double Image performs music which spans many styles - from jazz standards and original compositions to through-composed pieces and spontaneous improvisations, demonstrating Samuels deep versatility and spirit of collaboration.

In addition to his playing, Samuels is a respected educator and author and some of his new works can be found at MalletWorks.com and JazzBooks.com. Samuels has been voted “Best Vibes Player” in both Jazziz and Modern Drummer magazines, and was recently featured on the online jazz television show, Jazz it Up!

Friday, May 21, 2010

Jazz at the Dwyer
Take The A Train: A Big Band Swing Dance
7:00 – 11:00pm
Location: The Dwyer Cultural Center
(258 St. Nicholas Avenue at W. 123rd Street)
$20 | More information: info@DwyerCC.org
, presented with Community Works and The Dywer Cultural Center.

Featuring the NJMH All Star Big Band directed by Loren Schoenberg

Last month, Jazz at the Dwyer featured a romping Caribbean band; this month we’ll swing you into good health with the National Jazz Museum in Harlem All Star Big Band! The famed Big Band Swing era was full of dance bands that stomped and grooved with jitterbugging teens and adults following their every move. Tonight’s show is much more than nostalgia, it’s reclamation of an essential part of the dynamic that made jazz popular. Bring your dancing shoes!

Tuesday, May 25, 2010

Jazz for Curious Listeners
Tuning in to Tremé: Deeper Than the Water
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Weeks into the current HBO series that observes a city built on culture must be rebuilt with culture. That's precisely what is happening in New Orleans. How is this happening? Who are the artists and activists and organizations behind this cultural rebirth? And what can we learn from this experience about the role of culture in our lives and the needs of every American city?

Larry Blumenfeld, curator of this four-part JCL series on New Orleans, writes about music and culture for The Wall Street Journal, Village Voice and many other publications, and is editor-at-large of Jazziz magazine. He is a former Katrina Media Fellow with the Open Society Institute, researching cultural recovery in New Orleans.

Sean Bones is coming to Aspen!

Sean says:   "This winter I fought off the nasty weather with a drum machine. I got this old wooden Hammond thing in the fall, and I’d hide out in my draughty bedroom at night, meditating on tonal beats while winter buried my van and ripped leaves from the trees. After a period of falling asleep to its punchy tick tock on the bedside table, song skeletons started to take shape in my dreams. Specifically a melodic “Latin” setting started to infect my day like all the nose blowers at work. Soon I was sick. And I was coughing in time. I called my brother to come over with his bass and we blasted our new song out the window until the snow started to melt. That’s how I made the spring happen on my street."

"Sounds like Bones and his cough both got productive. And check the line “I’m gonna catch whatever you’ve got.” Sickness affected and infected his lyrics here as well. “Rhumba Beat”’s watery lead guitar and organ almost obscure the titular beat, before it changes entirely during the second half of the single. Maybe “Rhumba   Beat” signals outdoor activity weather, but it briefly hints at a darkened dancefloor as well."

US TOUR
04/07 – New York, NY @ Mercury Lounge
04/14 – Toronto, Ontario @ Lee’s Palace *
04/15 – Ann Arbor, MI @ Blind Pig *
04/16 – Chicago, IL @ Metro *
04/17 – Minneapolis, MN @ Fine Line Music Cafe *
04/19 – Aspen, CO @ Belly Up *
04/20 – Denver, CO @ Gothic Theatre *
04/22 – Boise, ID @ The Neurolux *
04/23 – Portland, OR @ Wonder Ballroom *
04/24 – San Francisco, CA @ Great American Music Hall *
04/28 – Lawrence, KS @ Jackpot Music Hall
04/29 – Indianapolis, IN @ Locals Only
04/30 – Pittsburgh, PA @ Garfield Artworks
*With Dr. Dog

THE WHIGS "IN THE DARK" OUT NOW!

Known for their enthralling live show, the Athens, GA trio The Whigs are currently on tour with Band Of Skulls and will make their Late Night with Jimmy Fallon debut April 27th. You can check out their recent appearance on The Late Show with David Letterman performing "Kill Me Carolyne," their raucous first single from their recently released album IN THE DARK. The song which brings a memorable strength to this exciting new collection, is now available for free download on the bands website and the video premieres today on Yahoo Music.
IN THE DARK is the follow up to the band’s two much-admired albums – GIVE ‘EM ALL A BIG FAT LIP and MISSION CONTROL. With each release, The Whigs have won over fans and critics with their pedal-to-the-metal power earning them universal praise as one of America’s finest young rock ‘n’ roll bands. Filter Magazine hailed for “artfully combining the disenchanted swagger of ‘70s punk with the infectious, catchy bounce of ‘60s pop” and Maxim Magazine simply called “riff-tastic.”
Spending much of 2008 and 2009 on the road, The Whigs have completed several tours with Kings Of Leon, The Kooks, Drive By-Truckers and others, have performed at Bonnaroo, Lollapalooza, Fuji Rock and T in The Park, among other festivals and worldwide stops and have performed on The Late Show with David Letterman, Late Night with Conan O’Brien and Jimmy Kimmel Live!.
Developed through years of non-stop touring and two critically acclaimed albums, IN THE DARK, with its impressive range and undeniable vigor, sees The Whigs doing what all-great bands do – furthering their artistic scope with each successive effort.
TOUR DATES:
4/6/10 - Cosmic Charlie’s -  Lexington, KY *
4/7/10 - Grimey's In-store - Nashville, TN
4/7/10 - Exit/In - Nashville, TN *
4/8/10 - 40 Watt - Athens, GA *
4/10/10 - WorkPlay Theatre - Birmingham, AL *
4/12/10 - Riot Room - Kansas City, MO *
4/13/10 - Boulder Theatre - Boulder, CO *
4/15/10 - Zia Record In-Store - Phoenix, AZ
4/15/10 - Martini Ranch - Phoenix, AZ *
4/17/10 - Outside O'Connell's Irish Pub - Norman, OK
4/18/10 - Cain's 2nd Stage - Tulsa, OK
4/19/10 - Outside Phoggy Dog - Lawrence, KS
4/20/10 - Mill Creek Bar, Appleton, WI
4/22/10 - Gargolye - St. Louis, MO
4/23/10 - Bottom Lounge - Chicago, IL
4/24/10 - University Of Wisconsin - Madison, WI
4/28/10 - The Mod Club Threatre - Toronto, ON *
4/29/10 - Live Lounge - Ottawa, ON *
4/30/10 - Studio JPR - Montreal, QC *
5/1/10 - Valentines - Albany, NY
5/2/10 - Higher Ground - Burlington, VT
5/5/10 - The Southern - Charlottesville, VA
5/6/10 - Jewish Mother - Virginia Beach, VA
5/7/10 - New Brookland Tavern - Columbia, SC
5/8/10 - Pour House - Charlestion, SC
5/15/10 - Hangout Music Festival - Gulf Shores, AL
6/5/10 - Mountain Jam - Hunter, NY
6/12/10 - Riverbend Festival - Chattanooga, TN
6/30/10 - Hyde Park w/ KINGS OF LEON - London, UK

* = Dates with Band Of Skulls

The Morning Pages Cover Lady Gaga

Brooklyn’s six-piece root-rockers The Morning Pages have just recorded an alt-country take on Lady Gaga’s "Telephone" along with a grainy lo-fi stock photography-esque video complete with slide guitars, cowboy hats and tin cans on strings, answering the question "How would "Telephone" play out in the 1850s?".  The ubiquitous song caught the attention of lead singer Grant Maxwell who decided to cover the song because "a great song is a great song and indie music doesn't have to be all dissonant and obscure and depressing all the time and on the other hand pop music could stand to sound a lot more organic and musical. My thought was they maybe we could combine the depth of roots music with the visceral enjoyment and popular appeal of mainstream music and get the next revolution started....also, I just couldn't get that song out of my head!" You can watch the new video HERE on YouTube.

With their 2007 EP The Company You Keep, The Morning Pages immediately stood out from other Brooklyn acts by tracing their roots back to country and folk influences such as Willie Nelson, Gram Parsons, Waylon Jennings, and The Band. It was this EP that caught the attention of Russell Simins of the Jon Spencer Blues Explosion who went on to produce their upcoming debut full length Rising Rain.

The album’s standouts include joyous foot-stompers like “With The Lord,” “Move To The Country” and “This City Keeps Me Down,” as well as plaintive ballads like the album’s first single “My Name Is Lion.”

The Morning Pages New York Dates:
April 9th – Brooklyn, NY @ Spike Hill
May 6th – Brooklyn, NY @ Cameo
May 20th – New York, NY @ Rockwood Music Hall
May 27th – New York, NY @ Bowery Ballroom (Dylan Fest 2010)

The Everyone Orchestra Performs in Colorado

The Everyone Orchestra embarks on a run of Colorado shows at the end of May including a stop in Fort Collins and three performances in Denver from May 20th – May 23rd. This rendition of the project features a stellar line up of nationally renowned talent including Steve Kimock (SKB, Zero), Kyle Hollingsworth (SCI), Jennifer Hartswick (Trey Anastasio Band), Dave Watts (The Motet), Jamie Janover (Zilla), Garrett Sayers (The Motet), Jamie Masefield (Jazz Mandolin Project) and YOU.

How do you fit into the Everyone Orchestra? The fully improvised performance is the brainchild of founder Matt Butler, who incorporates the skill set of the assembled all-star line up with the voices and sounds of the audience for a unique and fun musical experience.

Literally an orchestra where everyone in the room takes part, the Everyone Orchestra brings together a form of musical improvisation that is rarely accomplished to this degree. While the band actually only consists of one key player – conductor Matt Butler – each show features a rotating cast of up to a dozen players on any given night. Drawing on the wealth of talent local to the area he visits, or those performing at a festival, the concept lures local and national players who are often performing for the first time together and the audience of course, is performing right along.

The four-night traveling event will kick off at Hodi’s Half Note in Fort Collins on May 20th and will continue to Quixotes True Blue (formerly Owsleys) on Saturday May 21 and Sunday May 22nd. The Sunday, May 23rd performance is billed as a happy hour show featuring an acoustic set (minus Hollingsworth), and with other special guests yet to be announced.

The locally based organization, Conscious Alliance, will also be hosting a food drive, benefiting the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota. All patrons that donate 10 non-perishable food items will receive a free limited- edition Everyone Orchestra 2010 Colorado Tour poster created by the very special artist, Ryan Karrigant. Donations can be made with Conscious Alliance representatives at the front entrance of each venue.

Advance tickets for the Denver performance are on sale now at www.quixotes.com and for more information about the event and line up check out Everyone Orchestra.

ON TOUR:

Thursday, May 20 - Hodi’s Half Note, Ft. Collins, CO with opening act Acorn Project

Friday, May 21 - Quixotes True Blue, Denver with opening act Acorn Project

Saturday, May 22 - Quixtoes True Blue, Denver Euforquestra

Sunday, May 23 - Quixotes True Blue, Denver (acoustic, happy hour set)

Twistable, Turnable Man: Tribute to the Songs of Shel Silverstein

Shel Silverstein, as a writer, poet, and illustrator, has influenced generations upon generations of kids (and kids at heart) with his brilliant, witty, and touching turns of phrase.  In Twistable, Turnable Man: A Musical Tribute to the Songs of Shel Silverstein (June 8, 2010), Sugar Hill Records shines a light on the lyrical genius’s oft-overlooked catalog of classic country songs.

As a songwriter, Silverstein penned indelible songs made famous by artists such as Johnny Cash, Dr. Hook, Loretta Lynn, and others.  No country singer ever made Shel’s work as large a part of his repertoire, though, as Bobby Bare Sr., who first partnered with Silverstein on the seminal Outlaw Country album, Lullabys, Legends and Lies, entirely penned by ShelBare Sr. and then-five-year-old son Bobby Bare Jr. received a Grammy nod for the country radio hit “Daddy What If” (a win, incidentally, would have made Bare Jr. the youngest Grammy holder ever, until they were usurped by those mavens of country music: The Pointer Sisters). The song is revisited on the tribute by the now-grown son with his own four-year-old daughter Isabella, making her the third generation to pay homage to Shel on this heart wrenching tune.

On this collection, lovingly co-produced by Bare Sr. and Bare Jr., the wide range of Silverstein’s work – from humorous to poignant to edgy – is interpreted by two distinct generations influenced by Silverstein’s work. From Dr. Dog, My Morning Jacket and Andrew Bird, to Ray Price, Kris Kristofferson, and John Prine, the album is full of surprises and hidden gems. Bare Sr. says in his liners: “Shel would have loved every part of this album. This is the kind of thing he loved to do in the studio— having fun with friends, independent from all, doing it our way!”

Of the participating artists, Bobby Bare Jr., who grew up greatly influenced by Shel and went on to write with him as an adult, says “The lineup is a mix of people I have on speed dial, and people my dad has on speed dial” – fortunately they all just happened to be fans of Shel’s songwriting. Bare Jr. explains that Jim James of My Morning Jacket was already a huge fan of the song “Lullabys, Legends, and Lies,” which he would play as the house music between sets at MMJ shows. Bare Jr.’s friend and colleague Andrew Bird was the only artist permitted to put a poem to music, and his version of “The Twistable, Turnable Man Returns” is just as genuinely Bird as it is Silverstein, showing a striking similarity in their lyrical styles. Of John Prine, Bobby Bare Sr. insisted “This Guitar is for Sale” was perfectly suited to his wry and poignant style.

As a whole, the collection presents a variety of takes on a collection of material that lends itself to creative interpretation, making Twistable, Turnable Man: A Tribute to the Songs of Shel Silverstein an eclectic, endearing valentine to this giant of American song.