jazz

theNEWDEAL Announce Additional Autumn Tour

theNEWDEAL are excited to announce additional Autumn Dates in Colorado, the Midwest and Northeast as well as a few special shows with the JOIN and the OMEGA MOOS! Don't miss tND's exciting return to the Rockies as they hit Boulder, Denver, and Fort Collin in October. Shows have also been added in Bloomington, Madison and Ann Arbor as well as Buffalo and tND's first trip back to Cleveland since 2002!

In addition, Tom Hamilton and Clay Parnell (Brother's Past) re-ignite the JOIN as they headline the Muddy River Jam Festival and rocking the River Street Jazz Cafe in August. The OMEGA MOOS will make their jubilant return to Chicago for a special North Coast Festival after-party on September 4th at the Metro. Don't miss an all-new MOOS repertoire of songs as well as many old classics.

Make sure to check out www.thenewdeal.com and our Facebook page for updates and information on pre-sale ticketing for upcoming shows as well as other exciting news!

Upcoming Tour Dates:

Fri 8/13/10 (the JOIN)                  Muddy River Jam Festival, Woodstown, NJ

Sat 8/14/10 (the JOIN)                 River Street Jazz Cafe, Wilkes-Barre, PA

Thu 8/19/10                                Otto's, Dekalb, IL

Fri 8/20/10                                  Hoxeyville Music Festival, Wellston, MI

Sat 9/4/10                                   North Coast Music Festival, Chicago, IL

Sat 9/4/10 (OMEGA MOOS)           The Metro (Late Night), Chicago, IL

Sun 9/5/10                                  Nocturnal Festival, Apache Pass, TX

Wed 9/22/10                               Beachland Ballroom, Cleveland, OH

Thu 9/23/10                                Northern Lights, Clifton Park, NY

Fri 9/24/10                                  Electric Factory, Philadelphia, PA

Sat 9/25/10                                 Pearl Street, Northampton, MA

Thu 10/7/10                                Fox Theatre, Boulder, CO

Fri 10/8/10                                  Hodi's Halfnote, Ft. Collins, CO

Sat 10/9/10                                 Cervante's Masterpiece, Denver, CO

Tue 10/12/10                               The Bluebird, Bloomington, IN

Thu 10/14/10                               The Majestic, Madison, WI

Fri 10/15/10                                 The Blind Pig, Ann Arbor, MI

Sat 10/16/10                                The Town Ballroom, Buffalo, NY

Fri 11/12/10                                 Bear Creek Music Festival, Live Oak, FL

John Coltrane, Thelonious Monk and Sonny Roillins get 'Definitive'

Following up on the success of The Definitive Vince Guaraldi, Concord Music Group  has assembled three new titles in the Definitive series showcasing some of the most influential figures in modern jazz. The Definitive John Coltrane on Prestige and Riverside; The Definitive Thelonious Monk on Prestige and Riverside;The Definitive Sonny Rollins on Prestige, Riverside and Contemporary not only put the spotlight on the monumental work of three individual jazz players of the 1950s, but also provide an overview of the hard-bop period, one of the most significant chapters in the evolution of jazz. Each of the 2-CD collections is set for release on August 24, 2010.

The Definitive John Coltrane on Prestige and Riverside tracks Coltrane’s artistic development from his first Prestige recording session in November 1955 for Miles: The New Miles Davis Quintet to his last sessions for Prestige (for Bahia) in December 1958.

Trane’s career was marked by various shifts in style throughout the ’50s and ’60s, “but if you like straight-ahead, yet inventive, hard-bop playing, then this collection of recordings from the mid- to late ’50s is definitely one of the sweet spots,” says Nick Phillips, Concord Music Group’s Vice President of Jazz and Catalog A&R and the producer of the Definitive series. “And yet some of what you hear in these tracks gives hints about what was to come from this restlessly creative artist.”

Extensive liner notes by veteran music journalist and Coltrane biographer Ashley Kahn provide an in-depth look at the tracks and the circumstances surrounding their genesis. “The Definitive John Coltrane offers a best-of culled from these early recordings,” says Kahn, “offering an inspiring listening session that allows for much to be gleaned: Coltrane’s talent at recasting decades-old themes with a modern touch; a penchant for brooding, minor-key melodies; the uncanny rate of his personal development — building on his strengths, articulating a signature sound; an increased ability born in the one-take fire of three-hour recording dates to toss together timeless performances.”

The Definitive Thelonious Monk on Prestige and Riverside covers an even broader span of the ’50s, beginning with trio sessions in New York featuring bassist Gary Mapp and drummer Art Blakey in October 1952 and stretching to sextet dates in San Francisco with trumpeter Joe Gordon, tenor saxophonists Harold Land and Charlie Rouse, bassist John Ore and drummer Billy Higgins in April 1960.

“This is some of the most amazing Thelonious Monk on record,” says Phillips. “Whether he’s playing a standard or one of his own compositions, he sounds uniquely like Thelonious Monk and nobody else. All of the tunes in this collection that Monk wrote have become jazz standards. Conversely, he plays standard tunes like ‘Caravan’ and ‘Tea for Two’ with such distinctive genius that you’d swear he had written them himself.”

But Monk was no overnight sensation. He made “a long, slow climb from underground to mainstream adulation, and the ten-year period represented by this collection captures that ascent,” says Kahn in his liner notes. “The one constant — creatively, promotionally, and economically — was his recordings. First for Prestige Records from 1952 to ’54, then for the Riverside label from ’55 to ’61, Monk was afforded the chance to create new music and work with a number of significant jazz peers in a number of contexts — from solo piano, to trios, to quartets, even a big band . . . Most importantly, what Monk composed and recorded during the ’50s amount to the definitive versions of some of the most enduring, joyous melodies in modern jazz.”

The Definitive Sonny Rollins on Prestige, Riverside and Contemporary comes out a few weeks ahead of Rollins’ 80th birthday on September 7. Like the Thelonious Monk release, the Sonny Rollins set also covers almost an entire decade, from a December 1951 session in New York for Sonny Rollins with the Modern Jazz Quartet to an October 1958 session in Los Angeles for Sonny Rollins and the Contemporary Leaders.

“That was such a significant period in the development of jazz in general, and Sonny Rollins was at the heart of all that was going on during that decade,” says Phillips. “Just look at the Miles Davis session where he recorded ‘Airegin,’ ‘Doxy’ and ‘Oleo,’ for example. Those are all tunes that he penned, and all remain indelible jazz standards. That’s a whole lot of jazz history that was made on just a single day in the summer of 1954.”

Liner notes for The Definitive Sonny Rollins are provided by music journalist Bob Blumenthal, co-author with photographer John Abbott of the forthcoming book, Saxophone Colossus: A Portrait of Sonny Rollins.

“That the marks of [Rollins’] genius were fully apparent in the music he made over a half-century ago has been obvious to all who have followed the trajectory of his unprecedented career,” says Blumenthal. “As a contract artist with Prestige Records between 1951 and 1956, and through his work on various labels from 1957 until the beginning of an extended sabbatical two years later, Rollins laid the foundation for his status as a master improviser, saxophonist and composer; an influence far beyond his chosen instrument and idiom; and a living icon of affirmative creativity. Concord Music Group is the steward of many of the finest Rollins performances of the ’50s, and has culled them well in presenting this short course in what made Sonny Rollins Sonny Rollins.” released in October 2009.

National Jazz Museum in Harlem 2010 July Schedule

The July 2010 National Jazz Museum in Harlem schedule puts particular focus on the visual side of the jazz genre, as we feature classic films in our Jazz for Curious Listeners series (inaugurating a new collaboration with The Maysles Institute), interview one of the premier jazz photographers in the nation, Frank Stewart, for our flagship Harlem Speaks public program, and screen a rare film of “The High Priestess of Soul,” Nina Simone.

Since jazz is music for the soul, we feed your ears too, as the NJMH All-Stars will perform at Marcus Garvey Park before the airing of the Nina Simone film as well as at the Studio Museum in Harlem (our new programmatic partners) for the first Jazz at the Studio event, where the shades of blue and the blues will be pursued in sound and aesthetic fury.

We’ll also play the music of pianist Mal Waldron at our monthly Saturday Panel, spend an evening with the genius of Duke Ellington, and have a conversation with legendary jazz record producer Michael Cuscuna for the second of two monthly Harlem Speaks events.

Every single event this month is FREE, so since money is no object, take the time to join our swinging festivities!

Monday, July 5, 2010

Jazz for Curious Readers
An Evening With Duke Ellington
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Known as a composer/arranger/bandleader, duke Ellington was also a gifted author, and his autobiography, Music Is My Mistress, affords as much of an insight into his personality as his music does. Join us as we read and discuss Ellington the author.

Tuesday, July 6, 2010
Jazz for Curious Listeners

Jazz on Film: The Sound of Jazz
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Perhaps the most iconic jazz film ever made, The Sound of Jazz brought together 32 leading musicians from the swing era, including Count Basie, Lester Young, Ben Webster, Billie Holiday, Jo Jones, and Coleman Hawkins; the Chicago style players of the same era, such as Henry "Red" Allen, Vic Dickenson, and Pee Wee Russell; and younger "modernist" musicians such as Gerry Mulligan, Thelonious Monk, and Jimmy Giuffre. These players played separately with their compatriots, but also joined to combine various styles in one group, such as Red Allen's group and the group backing Billie Holiday on "Fine and Mellow," one of the most poignant moments of jazz ever caught on film. The song brought back together Lester Young and Holiday; Young's blues solo is transcendent in its painful beauty and sophisticated simplicity.

Thursday, July 8, 2010

Harlem Speaks
Frank Stewart, Photographer
6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Frank Stewart is a photographer whose image-making work rises to the level of fine art.

He was born in Nashville, Tennessee in 1949, and grew up in Memphis and Chicago. He attended the Art Institute of Chicago and received a BFA in photography from Cooper Union in New York. Stewart has had numerous solo and group shows at Cooper Union Gallery, Washington Project for the Arts, Studio Museum in Harlem, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, the International Center of Photography, Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, and Corcoran Gallery in Washington, D.C.

Stewart was a member of the first team of North American journalists invited by the government of Cuba to photograph the Island in 1977; he was also invited by the Los Angeles Committee to photograph the 1984 Olympics. He has been granted two photographic fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, a New York Creative Artist Public Service Award, and a 2002 NFFA fellowship. He was honored as Artist-in-Residence at the Studio Museum in Harlem in 1975, at Kenkeleba House in 1987, and at the Light Work Gallery at Syracuse University in 1989. His photographs were published in Sweet Swing Blues on the Road (text by Wynton Marsalis; published by WW Norton) and Smokestack Lightning: Adventures in Barbecue Country. Most recently, his work was featured in Romare Bearden: Photographs by Frank Stewart (published by Pomegranate) and The Sweet Breath of Life: A Poetic Narrative of the African-American Family (Frank Stewart, ed., with text by Ntozake Shange and photographs by Kamoinge Inc.; published by Simon & Schuster).

Stewart currently serves as Senior Staff Photographer for Jazz at Lincoln Center. He is a member of Kamoinge, a New York-based collective of African-American photographers. In addition to showing examples of his excellent jazz photography, Stewart will share anecdotes about his world travels with Wynton Marsalis, as well as accounts of times spent with Romare Bearden and Albert Murray as a driver.

Tuesday, July 13, 2010
Jazz for Curious Listeners

Jazz on Film: The Last of the Blue Devils
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Kansas City in the 1930s was a wild, wide-open place. Under political boss Tom Pendergast, the booze flowed freely, prostitution and gambling flourished, and the Depression pretty much passed the city by, making it an ideal spawning ground for some great music. Pianist-bandleader Count Basie, saxophone immortals Lester Young and Charlie Parker, and blues belters Big Joe Turner and Jimmy Rushing were all working there, along with a host of lesser-known but nonetheless formidable musicians, and they all played the blues, Kansas City style.


Director Bruce Ricker's 90-minute The Last of the Blue Devils chronicles the 1979 reunion of many of these legendary players, combining interviews, vintage film footage, photos, and some inimitably swinging performances by Basie, Turner, pianist Jay McShann, and many others to create an intimate, good-natured portrait of what one old-timer calls the "cool, relaxed sound" of the city. The camaraderie among these men, all of whom are colorful raconteurs, is palpable. But it's the music, surely, that's the main attraction; performances include some familiar tunes, like Turner's "Shake, Rattle & Roll" and a Basie big band version of "Night Train" (featuring tenor saxophonist Jimmy Forrest, the tune's composer) that's as greasy as the local barbecue. The Last of the Blue Devils is an absolute delight not to be missed!

Wednesday, July 14, 2010
Special Event
Film: Nina Simone Great Performances: College Concerts and Interviews
(Andy Stroud, USA, 60 mins.)
Music: The National Jazz Museum All-Stars
7:30-9:30pm
Location: Marcus Garvey Park (Lawn A located on the Madison Avenue side of the park between 122nd and 124th Streets)

A rare film of a radical artist in performance and in interviews, where she shares her views on race relations, and the role artists play in culture and society.
Eunice Kathleen Waymon (February 21, 1933 – April 21, 2003), better known by her stage name Nina Simone, was an American singer, songwriter, pianist, arranger, and civil rights activist. Although she disliked being categorized, Simone is arguably most associated with her performance of jazz music. Simone originally aspired to become a classical pianist, but her work covers an eclectic variety of musical styles that include classical music, jazz, the blues, soul, folk, R&B, gospel, and pop music. Her vocal style is characterized by intense passion, a loose vibrato, and a slightly androgynous timbre, in part due to her unusually low vocal range which veered between the alto and tenor ranges (occasionally even reaching baritone lows). Also known as The High Priestess of Soul, she paid great attention to the musical expression of emotions. Within one album or concert she could fluctuate between exuberant happiness and tragic melancholy.

Nina Simone recorded over 40 live and studio albums, the greatest body of her work being released between 1958 (when she made her debut with Little Girl Blue and 1974. Songs she is best known for include "My Baby Just Cares for Me", "I Put a Spell on You", "Four Women", "I Loves You Porgy", "Feeling Good", "Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood", "Sinnerman", "To Be Young, Gifted and Black", "Mississippi Goddam", "Ain't Got No, I Got Life" and "I Want a Little Sugar in My Bowl". Many of her songs are featured on motion picture soundtracks, as well as in video games, commercials and TV series.

This event is brought to you by the Maysles Cinema, Target ® and The National Jazz Museum of Harlem
Sunday, July 18, 2010

Jazz at The Studio
BLUE: A Shade of Difference
2:00 – 4:00pm
Location: The Studio Museum in Harlem
(144 West 125th Street)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Season Opener/Target Arts & Wonder Weekend Celebration

In this the kick-off performance of a new series, The NJMH All-Stars contemplate the color, the mood and art works that deal with the concept of blue and the blues. Blues, of course, are fundamental to jazz. But blues is way more than a simple, folk musical form. Many think the blues symbolize sadness and melancholy only; but blues music encompasses a full range of human emotion as a counter to what writer Albert Murray called “the blues as such.” Experiencing the variety of feelings evoked by Miles Davis’s recording, Kind of Blue, the best-selling jazz recording of all time, demonstrates this effect . . . as will today’s concert at the Studio Museum in Harlem.

Tuesday, July 20, 2010

Jazz for Curious Listeners
Jazz on Film: Sound—John Cage and Rahsaan Roland Kirk PLUS!
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: The Maysles Institute
(343 Malcolm X Blvd / Lenox Ave (Between 127th and 128th Streets))
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300
Tuesday, July 27, 2010

*Note tonight's special location.

If you have never seen Dick Fontaine’s groundbreaking film paring John Cage and Rahsaan Roland Kirk, run, don’t walk, to this screening. In addtionl, we’ll be showing examples of experimental film and experimental jazz including shorts by Shirley Clark and Rudy Burckhardt and a reception with Manny Kircheimer's Stations of the Elevated playing.

Tuesday, July 27, 2010

Jazz for Curious Listeners
Jazz on Film—Thelonious Monk: Straight No Chaser
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: The Maysles Institute
(343 Malcolm X Blvd / Lenox Ave [between 127th and 128th Streets])
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

*Note tonight's special location.

Filmmaker Bruce Ricker couldn't believe his luck: Michael and Christian Blackwood's extensive 1968 footage of the groundbreaking modern jazz pianist and composer Thelonious Monk, including the only footage of the very private Monk off stage, turned out to be in excellent condition. The reels were, in Ricker's words, "just sitting there like the Dead Sea Scrolls of jazz." Ricker, as co-producer, joins director and fellow producer Charlotte Zwerin, executive producer Clint Eastwood and others to bring these scrolls to astonishing life. Their Thelonious Monk: Straight No Chaser combines the Blackwood's rare footage of Monk in studio on tour and behind the scenes with new interviews, archival photos and more to create a landmark aural and visual treat released 20 years after the original footage was shot.

Here are the tunes you’ll hear tonight, in order of appearance: Evidence; Rhythm-a-ning; On the Bean; Round Midnight; Well, You Needn't; Bright Mississippi; Blue Monk; Trinkle, Tinkle; Rhythm-a-ning; Ugly Beauty; Ask Me Now; Just a Gigolo; Crepuscule with Nellie; I Should Care; We See; Osaka T.; Evidence; Epistrophy, Don't Blame Me; Ruby, My Dear; I Mean You; Lulu's Back in Town; Off Minor; Pannonica; Boo Boo's Birthday; Misterioso; Monk's Mood; Sweetheart of All My Dreams; and Round Midnight.

Need we say more? See you at the Maysles Institute!


Thursday, July 29, 2010

Harlem Speaks
Michael Cuscuna, Record Producer
6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Michael Cuscuna is a discographer, writer and record producer par excellence.
He played drums, saxophone and flute during his teenage years, but wasn’t professional material. So, instead, he turned his attention to radio and recordings. He had a jazz show on WXPN and worked for ESP-Disk in the late 1960s, while also writing for Jazz & Pop Magazine, Rolling Stone and Down Beat. After stints at WMMR in Philadelphia and WABC-FM (now WPLJ) in New York as a progressive rock DJ, he took a position as a producer with Atlantic Records in the 1970s, recording Buddy Guy, Dave Brubeck and the Art Ensemble of Chicago. He also produced albums by Bonnie Raitt (Give It Up), Martin Mull, Luther Allison and Chris Smither. He also produced for ABC (doing reissues of Impulse! albums), Arista, Muse, Freedom, Elektra and Novus. From 1975 to 1981 he went through the Blue Note archives and recovered many unissued sessions which are now prized.

Along with Charlie Lourie, he founded Mosaic Records in 1983 specializing in jazz reissue box sets, with almost 200 releases as of 2009. Artists surveyed include highly visible masters like Thelonious Monk, Miles Davis, and Nat “King” Cole, and lesser known artists such as Tina Brooks and Ike Quebec. Cuscuna has won three Grammy Awards for his releases. Since 1984, Cuscuna has been a special consultant, producer, and reissue director of Blue Note Records.

Saturday, July 31, 2010

Saturday Panels The World of Mal Waldron 12:00 – 4:00pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

A pianist with a brooding, rhythmic, introverted style, Mal Waldron's playing was flexible enough to fit into both hard bop and freer settings. Influenced by Thelonious Monk's use of space, Waldron had his own distinctive chord voicings nearly from the start. Early on, Waldron played jazz on alto and classical music on piano, but he switched permanently to jazz piano while at Queens College. He freelanced around New York in the early '50s with Ike Quebec (for whom he made his recording debut), Big Nick Nicholas, and a variety of R&B-ish groups. Waldron frequently worked with Charles Mingus from 1954-1956 and was Billie Holiday's regular accompanist during her last two years (1957-1959). Often hired by Prestige to supervise recording sessions, Waldron contributed many originals (including "Soul Eyes," which became a standard) and basic arrangements that prevented spontaneous dates from becoming overly loose jam sessions.

He mostly led his own groups after Holiday's death, although he was part of the Eric Dolphy-Booker Little Quintet that was recorded extensively at the Five Spot in 1961, and also worked with Abbey Lincoln for a short stint. He wrote three film scores before moving permanently to Europe in 1965, settling in Munich in 1967. Waldron, who occasionally returned to the U.S. for visits, was a major force in the European jazz world. His album Free at Last was the first released by ECM, and his Black Glory was the fourth Enja album. Waldron, who frequently teamed up with Steve Lacy (often as a duet), kept quite busy up through the '90s, featuring a style that evolved but was certainly traceable to his earliest record dates. Among the many labels that have documented his music have been Prestige, New Jazz, Bethlehem, Impulse, Musica, Affinity, ECM, Futura, Nippon Phonogram, Enja, Freedom, Black Lion, Horo, Teichiku, Hat Art, Palo Alto, Eastwind, Baybridge, Paddle Wheel, Muse, Free Lance, Soul Note, Plainisphere, and Timeless. In September of 2002, Waldron was diagnosed with cancer. Remaining optimistic, he continued to tour until he passed away on December 2 in Brussels, Belgium at the age of 76.

TAEKO June 16 at the Kitano | NYC

TAEKO's latest CD, Voice, is a tasteful collection of songs from some very different sources that she treats with the same skillful execution.  Taeko Fukao, a native of Japan, has acquired the command of her instrument, her voice, and applied it to the genre of jazz in a way that is both technically significant and entertaining.  Her handling of the intricacies of the jazz genre has a clear sense of remarkable talent honed by a recognizable work ethic.

Under the coaching of Juanita Fleming, Taeko has evolved in her jazz voice and has taken on some interesting projects on Voice, including a lyric written by Fleming for Herbie Hancock's familiar tune, "Cantaloupe Island."  Taeko has a soulful, wistful voice with an ever so faint hint of her Asian ancestry, that sneaks into the tunes in the most appropriate way, especially during her expressive phrasing.  Taeko puts together a set list that includes the works of Marvin Gaye, "Inner City Blues," Wayne Shorter's "Infant Eyes," and Stanley Turrentine's "Sugar." Then mixes it up a bit with titles such as "Spring Nocturne," an original by the singer, and "Biwako," a traditional Japanese folk song that was a hit in Japan in the 1940's.

Taeko's approach to each of these songs is different, but consistent in each of them is the attention to execution, the precision and skilled management of her instrument is coupled with a playful and emotional coloring that conveys a shear joy with the work.   Taeko's voice is a pleasure to listen to.  Even when in its deepest range it is still lite and gentle, while remaining full.  Her scat capability is remarkable in and of itself and presents itself in a lively rendition of Sly Stone's "Stand!"

Overall, Taeko is brilliant in both her native language and her acquired language.  She demonstrates the skills built on a native talent that has been honed by a significant effort to convey the art of jazz vocals with all the musical elements in place and the heart and soul of a true jazz singer.

I found the entire CD to be a delightful departure from the run of the mill standards singers I have been hearing lately.  A refreshing new twist on some old favorites and an introduction into some new music from a Japanese influence, Taeko bridges both worlds exceptionally well.   If you haven't heard of TAEKO, or listened to her Voice, then you must check it out!

Britain's Gwyneth Herbert in the United States

Gwyneth Herbert, whose sublime version of Neil Young’s Only Love Can Break Your Heart appeared on the soundtrack to 2009 Rom-Com smash Leap Year has been hailed as a priceless talent. A quirky, original singer-songwriter, inspired as much by Janis Ian and Joni Mitchell, as by Billie Holliday or Nina Simone. Her latest collection, All The Ghosts (on boutique British label Naim Edge) features ten terrific songs, which speak to you directly, without forethought for genre or category. In their melodic immediacy and observational characterization, you might hear the Lennon-McCartney of ‘Sgt Pepper’, or the Ray Davies of ‘Lola’, rather than any jazz stereotype.

Expect witty, captivating vignettes populated by a living, breathing cast of beaten-down dreamers, jaded city-dwellers, and women in a quandary. She appears here on piano and ukulele with support from regular guitar partner Al Cherry and double-bassist Sam Burgess.

One of the UK’s finest and most original singer-songwriters plays three shows in support of All The Ghosts, her critically acclaimed new album. Released in the US on June 8th on Naim Edge (via Allegro)

Thursday 17th June The Living Room http://www.livingroomny.com/ Ludlow Street, New York, USA 10002

Friday 18th June Rochester Jazz Festival http://www.rochesterjazz.com/, Christ Church http://www.christchurchrochester.org/music/ - Made In The UK Series, 141 East Ave, Rochester, New York, USA

Saturday 19th  Rochester Jazz Festival http://www.rochesterjazz.com/, Max of Eastman Place, http://www.maxrochester.net/eastman-place/ 387 East Main St, Rochester, New York NY 14604

SALUTE TO JAMES MOODY AT ZANKEL HALL

Carnegie Hall today announced that trumpeter Jon Faddis and saxophonist and NEA Jazz Master Jimmy Heath will join the all-star celebration honoring the life and music of one of jazz music’s living legends, James Moody, on Wednesday, June 23 at 8:30 p.m. in Zankel Hall. Heath and Faddis will step in for Moody, the revered saxophonist and NEA Jazz Master, who must regrettably withdraw from this performance as his doctors have advised him against traveling while he continues to recuperate from gallbladder surgery. The performance, originally scheduled for April 7 in celebration of Moody’s 85th birthday, is now titled A Salute to James Moody and will feature Heath and Faddis along with previously announced guest artists, including pianist Renee Rosnes, bassist Todd Coolman, and drummer Adam Nussbaum, as well as special guests: trumpeter Randy Brecker, clarinetist and NEA Jazz Master Paquito D'Rivera, and vocalist Roberta Gambarini.

The June 23 performance is presented by Carnegie Hall in partnership with Absolutely Live Entertainment and CareFusion Jazz Festival New York and is one of five CareFusion Jazz Festival events taking place at Carnegie Hall in June. Tickets for the originally scheduled April 7 performance will be honored at the performance on June 23. For details, ticketholders can call CarnegieCharge at 212-247-7800.

Jon Faddis is a consummate musician—conductor, composer, and educator. Marked by both intense integrity and humor, Faddis earned accolades from his close friend and mentor Dizzy Gillespie, who declared, “He's the best ever, including me!” As a trumpeter, Faddis possesses a virtually unparalleled range, and with full command of his instrument, he makes the practically impossible seem effortless. After working in Lionel Hampton's band, Faddis joined the Thad Jones/Mel Lewis Orchestra at the Village Vanguard, formed his own quartet, and soon began directing orchestras, including the Grammy-winning United Nation Orchestra, the Dizzy Gillespie 70th Birthday Big Band, the Dizzy Gillespie Alumni All-Stars, the Carnegie Hall Centennial Big Band, the Carnegie Hall Jazz Band, and the Jon Faddis Jazz Orchestra of New York (2003–present). In addition, the Chicago Jazz Ensemble named Faddis as its Artistic Director in 2004. He continues to conduct both the Chicago Jazz Ensemble and the Jon Faddis Jazz Orchestra of New York, and regularly leads master classes and clinics across the world. Faddis serves as Professor and Director of Jazz Performance at the Conservatory of Music at Purchase College-SUNY and is a guest lecturer at Columbia College Chicago.

Jimmy Heath, the middle of the legendary Heath Brothers, has long been recognized as a brilliant instrumentalist, composer, and arranger. He has performed with nearly all of the jazz greats of the last 50 years, from Howard McGhee and Dizzy Gillespie to Miles Davis and Wynton Marsalis. One of Heath’s earliest big bands included John Coltrane, Benny Golson, Specs Wright, Johnny Coles, Ray Bryant, and Nelson Boyd. During his career, Jimmy Heath has performed on more than 100 record albums including seven with The Heath Brothers and 12 as a leader. He has written over 125 compositions, many of which have become jazz standards and have been recorded by other notable artists including James Moody, Art Farmer, Cannonball Adderley, Clark Terry, Chet Baker, Miles Davis, Milt Jackson, Ahmad Jamal, Ray Charles, Dizzy Gillespie, and Dexter Gordon. For 11 years, Heath served as Professor of Music at the Aaron Copland School of Music at Queens College. He maintains an extensive performance schedule and continues to conduct workshops and clinics throughout the United States, Europe, and Canada.

Program Information
Wednesday, June 23 at 8:30 p.m.
Zankel Hall
A SALUTE TO JAMES MOODY (formerly titled “JAMES MOODY'S 85TH BIRTHDAY PARTY”)
Randy Brecker, Trumpet
Paquito D'Rivera, Clarinet
Jon Faddis, Trumpet
Roberta Gambarini, Vocals
Jimmy Heath, Saxophone
with
Renee Rosnes, Piano
Todd Coolman, Bass
Adam Nussbaum, Drums

Presented by Carnegie Hall in partnership with Absolutely Live Entertainment, LLC and CareFusion Jazz Festival New York.

Bank of America is the Proud Season Sponsor of Carnegie Hall.

Ticket Information
There are a limited number of single tickets remaining, starting at $36, available at the Carnegie Hall Box Office, 154 West 57th Street. Tickets may also be charged to major credit cards by calling CarnegieCharge at 212-247-7800 or online by visiting carnegiehall.org.

The 2010 Smooth Cruise Jazz Series

The Smooth Cruise jazz series is back and better than ever!  This  summer's lineup features live intimate performances by artists including Down to the Bone, Spyro Gyra, Najee, Alex Bugnon, Marion  Meadows, Pieces of a Dream, RnR, Guitars & Saxes, The Rippingtons  feat. Russ Freeman, Mindi Abair, and Jonathan Butler!   All performances are on the water with the New York City skyline as the backdrop as Smooth Jazz New York sets sail aboard The Spirit of New York on the Hudson River every Wednesday night from June 30th through September 1st.  The ship departs from Pier 61 at Chelsea Piers in Manhattan with TWO shows per evening— The Sunset Cruise at 6:30PM and the Moonlight Cruise at 9:30PM.

The Smooth Cruises sell out fast. So get your tickets now. For tickets  and more information log onto SmoothJazzNewYork.com.

Purchase Tickets Now at http://www.spiritofnewyork.com/ny/jazz_cruise.jsp

Tickets available by:  Calling Spirit Cruises at 866-211-3812  | Visiting Spirit Cruises box office Pier 61, Chelsea Piers

Chris Massey's The Nue Jazz Project Upcoming Appearances

Chris Massey is following his ambition of making a name for himself as a new breed of young talented player in the world of jazz. Growing up in small town Uniontown, Ohio where he picked up his first pair of drumsticks a the age of 9 he took his first steps into his musical career as a Jazz Performance major at Youngstown State University in 2000.

Among performing with such modern legends such as Donald Harrison Jr., Joe Lovano, Dave Holland and members of the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra Chris is also an accomplished composer and arranger. Gaining inspiration from notable drummer-composers such as Brian Blade and Jeff "Tain" Watts; Chris has began composing his first works in early 2001. Chris also has been teaching lessons of all age varieties from the skill ranges of beginner to advanced college for over a decade.


Chris above all else is a modern drummer taught in the old tradition of swing; his ethos is to "put his sound" underneath a player and let the fire start to spread. He is currently residing in the New York City area and performing with/leading his modern jazz group "The Nue Jazz Project". He has performed in many venues across the city such as Smoke, Cleopatra's Needle, Smalls, Fat Cat, 55bar, The Garage, The Iridium and many others. He currently finished recording his debut album entitled "Vibrainium" due to be released in Fall 2010


Upcoming Shows:

June 5th 6:15-10:15pm The Garage NYC, NY (99 7th ave south at Christopher St.) http://www.garagerest.com/
June 16th 8pm-9pm The Shrine NYC, NY (2271 Adam Clayton Powell Jr Boulevard) http://www.shrinenyc.com/
June 27th 8pm-10pm The 5C Cultural Center (68 Ave. C) (Nue Jazz Trio) http://5cculturalcenter.org/
July 3rd 6:15-10:15 The Garage NYC, NY (99 7th ave south at Christopher St.) http://www.garagerest.com/
July 11th 8pm-9:15pm The Blue Owl NYC, NY (196 2nd Avenue/13th st) http://www.blueowlnyc.com/
July 22nd 9pm-11:30pm Puppets Jazz Bar Brooklyn, NY (481 5th Ave) (Internet Distribution Release Party) http://www.puppetsjazz.com/
Aug 7th 6:15-10:15pm The Garage NYC, NY (99 7th ave south at Christopher St.) http://www.garagerest.com/

Ornette Coleman Receives Honorary Doctorate of Music from the University of Michigan

Music legend Ornette Coleman received an honorary doctorate of music from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.  The Department of Jazz and Contemporary Improvisation of the School of Music, Theatre and Dance congratulates Mr. Coleman on this great honor, his 80th birthday, and for being one of the most important musicians and innovators of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.  The event also included a commencement address by President Barack Obama.

THE OFFICIAL CEREMONY TEXT

“Mr. Coleman, your performances and your path-breaking theories of jazz and music have transformed how musicians play and what listeners hear.  Your self-taught musical education blossomed into a radically novel sound, giving the world musical styles it had never heard before.  In your long career of ongoing creativity, you have played a vital role in preserving and enhancing America’s cultural legacy, and you have cultivated the talent of the future.  The University of Michigan is proud to present you with the honorary degree, Doctor of Music.”


MORE ABOUT ORNETTE COLEMAN

Ornette Coleman is a leading composer and performer of jazz, whose remarkable artistry is admired around the world.  Born in Fort Worth, Texas, in 1930, he taught himself how to play the saxophone and had formed his first band by the age of fourteen.  After touring with a traveling ensemble, he moved to Los Angeles and began to teach himself music theory while working as an elevator operator.  During this period, he performed with a rehearsal ensemble that allowed him to experiment with the new theoretical concepts he was developing.  The result of his self-study was a new freedom in jazz performance that has been described as a radically new concept and style that originated from his musical intuition, combining southwestern country blues and his own highly personal interpretations of music theory.  The compositional voice that Mr. Coleman developed in the 1950s would remain his trademark style and sound throughout his career.  The first of his many influential albums was recorded in 1958, released under the title Something Else, which launched him as a major innovator of jazz, leading to many more albums and a famous breakthrough engagement at the Five Spot Café in New York City, where he moved permanently.  His music, freed from the conventions of harmony, rhythm, and melody, both polarized and transformed the jazz community, and he devoted decades to understanding and discovering the shape of not just jazz, but all music to come.  At the core of his music is his theory of Harmolodics, which addresses the question of the sound and performance of music beyond the melody.  Beyond the twenty albums he released in the 1960s, Mr. Coleman also began to write string quartets, woodwind quintets, and symphonies based on his pioneering theories of musical composition.  His remarkable contributions to music have been recognized by a multitude of honors, including several honorary degrees, appointment as a MacArthur Foundation Fellow, induction into the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and the presentation of the prestigious Praemium Imperiale Award of the Japanese government.  In 2007 he was honored with a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award, and won the Pulitzer Prize in Music in 2007 for his album Sound Grammar.  In 2009 he became the 16th musician in history to be presented with the Miles Davis Award, in recognition for his regeneration of the jazz idiom.  His recent 80th birthday in March was marked with a variety of tributes, from articles, to concerts, to all-day broadcasts of his music.

Marsha Heydt & the Project of Love Performing @ The Garage

Marsha Heydt is an accomplished woodwind player whose stylistic expertise spans the gamut of Latin, Funk, Jazz and Rock.  In addition to her Bachelor of Music from the University of the Arts, she holds a Masters in Music Education from the Aaron Copland School of Music.

She has studied privately with Ron Kerber, John Blake, Larry McKenna, Jim Pugh, John Stubblefield and Sir Roland Hanna.  In June 2002, the Brooklyn Conservatory of Music’s Professional development Fund awarded her a grant to study with the renowned Jimmie Amadie. She is mentored on sax and flute by Eric Person and teaches at various prestigious private schools and music conservatories in New York City.

Marsha has shared the stage with Grover Washington, Bill Watrous, Bob Mintzer, Randy Brecker, John Stubblefield, George Gee and his “Make Believe Ballroom Orchestra” and with Paul Schaefer in a guest appearance on The David Letterman Show and has appeared at Gerald Veasley’s Jazz Bass in Reading, PA.

Marsha also plays with her own ensemble, in and around New York City performing in both private and public venues, including the Iridium Jazz Club and Swing 46.  She also performs each month for recovering patients at NYU Hospital’s Rusk Institute.

Marsha Heydt and the Project of Love Performing at The Garage | Sunday, June 6, 2010
99 Seventh Ave. South, New York, NY 10014 | 212-645-0600 | http://www.garagerest.com/