jazz

National Jazz Museum in Harlem March Schedule

A weekful of events kicks of with a great honor: a program presented in conjunction with the legendary Apollo Theater. Jazz for Curious Listeners celebrates the Apollo Theater’s 75th Anniversary with a session including film and an interview with Tajah Murdock, who danced there in the 1940’s.
 
The legendary jazz advocate Phoebe Jacobs graces Harlem Speaks on Thursday evening, recounting her close associations with Louis Armstrong, Ella Fitzgerald, Peggy Lee and others.
 
Downtown, at the Rubin Museum of Art, Harlem in the Himalayas continues with bassist Henry Grimes in duo with guitarist Marc Ribot.
 
And the week ends with our third Saturday Panel, dedicated to a pair of true jazz iconoclasts, clarinetist Pee Wee Russell and trumpeter Frankie Newton. Our guests that day will include Dan Morgenstern, George Avakian, George Wein, Nat Hentoff, and a film show hosted by Hank O’Neal.

Tuesday, March 24, 2009

SPECIAL

Jazz for Curious Listeners
Jazz at the Apollo
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: The Apollo Theater
(253 West 125th St.)
FREE | Seating is limited. Please call to reserve a seat.

The world-famous Apollo Theater in Harlem is a testament to the great African-American musical performers of the 20th century, regardless of genre. Yet the connection between this landmark venue and jazz is special. Rare if ever does a month go by during the various public programs at the National Jazz Museum in Harlem when senior music lovers and musicians don’t recall witnessing, for instance, the great Ellington and Basie big bands swinging with down-home majesty and emotive grace. The Apollo Theater is essential to the living history of jazz, and to the careers of legends such as Ella Fitzgerald, Sarah Vaughan and Gloria Lynne, each of whom won the Amateur Night competition, launching their illustrious careers. Tonight’s Jazz on Film will take place at the Apollo Theater, for free! See you there. (Seating is limited. Please call to reserve a seat.)  

Thursday, March 26, 2009

Harlem Speaks
Phoebe Jacobs, Jazz Advocate
6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | Reservations: 212-348-8300

Phoebe Jacobs, born in 1918 in the Bronx, began her career in jazz as the hat check girl at her uncle’s club, where she met and worked with jazz greats such as Sarah Vaughan, Eubie Blake, Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman, and Ella Fitzgerald. “Sarah would say to me, ‘Gee, do you know where I can get my dress shortened’ or where can I have my nails done?’ They use to ask me things and I would do them for them. Then over the years they began to count on me.”

That’s an understatement, considering her work with and on behalf of the father of jazz. See, Jacobs worked in public relations for various jazz record labels and clubs, and became Louis Armstrong’s publicist, and, eventually, the Executive Vice President of the Louis Armstrong Educational Foundation, Inc.

In her role with the Armstrong Foundation, Jacobs was instrumental in efforts to honor his legacy, including the drive for the 1995 Louis Armstrong postal stamp. She is also a founding member of the Jazz Foundation of America (JFA), an organization devoted to aiding older jazz and blues musicians in financial difficulty or those experiencing health problems. (JFA’s Executive Director, Wendy Oxenhorn, was the  guest of Harlem Speaks on February 26, 2009.)

In 2003, Jacobs was honored with the Jazz at Lincoln Center Award for Leadership which she received at the concert “Here’s to the Ladies: A Celebration of Great Women in Jazz.” In 2007, her 89th birthday was celebrated at a JVC Jazz Festival concert at the Danny Kaye Playhouse.

What better way to honor Women’s History Month than to be present tonight, as the National Jazz Museum in Harlem presents an interview with Phoebe Jacobs?    

Friday, March 27, 2009                   

Harlem in the Himalayas

Henry Grimes and Marc Ribot
7:00pm
Location: Rubin Museum of Art
(150 West 17th Street)
$18 in advance | $20 at door |
Box Office: 212.620.5000 ext. 344

HENRY GRIMES

Master jazz musician (acoustic bass, violin) Henry Grimes has played more than 300 concerts in 23 countries since May of 2003, when he made his astonishing return to the music world after 35 years away.

He was born and raised in Philadelphia and attended the Mastbaum School and Juilliard. In the '5O's and '6O's, he came up in the music playing and touring with Willis "Gator Tail" Jackson, "Bullmoose" Jackson, "Little" Willie John, and a number of other great R&B / soul musicians; but, drawn to jazz, he went on to play, tour, and record with many great jazz musicians of that era, including Albert Ayler, Don Cherry, Benny Goodman, Coleman Hawkins, Roy Haynes, Lee Konitz, Steve Lacy, Charles Mingus, Gerry Mulligan, Sunny Murray, Sonny Rollins, Roswell Rudd, Pharoah Sanders, Archie Shepp, Cecil Taylor, McCoy Tyner, and Rev. Frank Wright.

Sadly, a trip to the West Coast to work with Al Jarreau and Jon Hendricks went awry, leaving Henry in Los Angeles at the end of the '60's with a broken bass he couldn't pay to repair, so he sold it for a small sum and faded away from the music world. Many years passed with nothing heard from him, as he lived in his tiny rented room in an S.R.O. hotel in downtown Los Angeles, working as a manual laborer, custodian, and maintenance man, and writing many volumes of handwritten poetry.

He was discovered there by a Georgia social worker and fan in 2002 and was given a bass by William Parker, and after only a few weeks of ferocious woodshedding, Henry emerged from his room to begin playing concerts around Los Angeles and shortly afterwards made a triumphant return to New York City in May 2003 to play in the Vision Festival.

Since then, often working as a leader, he has played, toured, and/or recorded with  musicians such as Rashied Ali, Marshall Allen, Fred Anderson, Marilyn Crispell, Ted Curson, Andrew Cyrille, Bill Dixon, Dave Douglas, Andrew Lamb, David Murray, William Parker, Marc Ribot, and Cecil Taylor. Henry has also given a number of workshops and master classes on major campuses, released several new recordings, made his professional debut on a second instrument (the violin) at the age of 7O, has now published the first volume of his poetry, "Signs Along the Road." He has also been creating illustrations to accompany his new recordings and publications. He has received many honors in recent years, including four Meet the Composer grants and a grant from the Acadia Foundation. He can be heard on more than 8O recordings on various labels. Henry Grimes now lives and teaches in New York City.

MARC RIBOT                            

Marc Ribot (pronounced REE-bow) was born in Newark, New Jersey in 1954. As a teen, he played guitar in various garage bands while studying with his mentor, Haitian classical guitarist and composer Frantz Casseus. After moving to New York City in 1978, Ribot was a member of the soul/punk Realtones, and from 1984 - 1989, of John Lurie's Lounge Lizards. Between 1979 and 1985, Ribot also worked as a side musician with Brother Jack McDuff, Wilson Pickett, Carla Thomas, Rufus Thomas, Chuck Berry, and many others.

Ribot's recording credits include Tom Waits, Elvis Costello, Marianne Faithful, Caetano Veloso, Laurie Anderson, McCoy Tyner, T-Bone Burnett, The Jazz Passengers, The Lounge Lizards, Jamaaladeen Tacuma, Medeski Martin & Wood, James Carter, Alan Toussaint, Allen Ginsburg, Madeline Peyroux, and many others, many of whom hail from other countries and continents. Ribot frequently collaborates with producer T Bone Burnett, most recently on Alison Krauss and Robert Plant's Grammy award winning Raising Sand and regularly works with composer John Zorn.

Marc's talents have also been showcased with a full symphony orchestra. Composer Stewart Wallace wrote a guitar concerto with orchestra specifically for Marc. The piece was premiered by the National Symphony Orchestra in Washington DC in July of 2004 and also appeared at The Cabrillo Festival in Santa Cruz, CA in August of 2005.

Marc is currently touring with two bands, the Albert Ayler tribute project "Spiritual Unity" (Pi Recordings), featuring original Ayler bassist Henry Grimes, and Ceramic Dog featuring bassist Shahzad Ismaily an drummer Ches Smith. Ceramic Dog will release their debut album "Party Intellectuals" this May on Pi Recordings in the North America, and Enja in Europe and Japan.

Saturday, March 28, 2008

Saturday Panels
We Remember Frankie Newton and Pee Wee Russell: A day with George Wein, Dan Morgenstern, George Avakian and Nat Hentoff
10:00am – 4:00pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | Reservations: 212-348-8300

Join us for our Saturday panel, where George Wein, Dan Morgenstern, George Avakian and Nat Hentoff will share their memories of trumpeter Frankie Newton and clarinetist Pee Wee Russell.  
PEE WEE RUSSELL     

Clarinetist Pee Wee Russell was born Charles Ellsworth Russell in St. Louis and began playing clarinet in Muskogee Oklahoma, famous for giving the jazz world pianist Jay McShann. Pee Wee's career in jazz began in the early 1920's in Chicago with Bix Beiderbecke and Frank Trumbauer, and he cut his first sides with Red Nichols and his Five Pennies in 1929. The band also featured Glenn Miller and Jack Teagarden on trombones, Bud Freeman on tenor sax and Eddie Condon on guitar.

By the early 1930's, Pee Wee moved to New York where he found a steady home in the bands of Eddie Condon and jamming with a roster of hot jazz players including Bobby Hackett, Red Allen, Edmond Hall, Hot Lips Page, Jack Bland, Buster Bailey and Vic Dickenson. Pee Wee played in the all-star band put together by Eddie Condon for Fats Waller's Carnegie Hall debut in 1942, which also included Bud Freeman and Gene Krupa. Throughout most of the 1940's Pee Wee could be found playing at Nick's, the popular Greenwich Village restaurant/club that was a mainstay for hot musicians as the swing era evolved into bop. During this period Pee Wee was recording sides for Milt Gabler's Commodore label under his own name and as a sideman.

In 1951 after years of heavy drinking and not taking care of himself, Russell fell ill and so near death that a benefit concert was held in his honor. After weeks in the hospital, including several blood transfusions, Pee Wee returned to New York and played a well received set at the Newport Jazz Festival with Thelonious Monk thus proving his talent for all music whether traditional or bop.

Pee Wee was a consummate small group player. Although he was offered jobs with many of the top-name big bands of the day, Pee Wee preferred the small group swing that he had been playing all his life, and with the exception of a short stint with Bobby Hackett's Big Band played exclusively in small groups. Russell was a mainstay in traditional jazz bands along the east coast until his death in 1969.

FRANKIE NEWTON
 
Admired by both Louis Armstrong and Dizzy Gillespie, trumpeter Frankie Newton had a relatively brief but artistically rewarding career. He had stints with Lloyd Scott (1927-1929), Cecil Scott (1929-1930), Chick Webb, Elmer Snowden, Charlie Johnson, and Sam Wooding, and appeared on Bessie Smith's final recording session in 1933. Newton worked with Charlie Barnet's short-lived integrated band in 1936 and with Teddy Hill, before briefly becoming closely associated with bassist John Kirby and his associates. The eventual John Kirby Sextet would have been the logical place for the trumpeter, but a falling out in 1937 ended up with the younger Charlie Shavers getting the spot in the commercially successful group. Newton instead played for Mezz Mezzrow and Lucky Millinder, led a few record dates (including participating in a set for Hugues Panassie), and worked at Cafe Society, accompanying Billie Holiday on several of her records (most notably "Strange Fruit"). As the 1940s progressed, Newton became less interested in music and gradually faded from the scene, painting more than playing.
 
Nat Hentoff has written that Newton was “matched only by Miles Davis for intimately evocative and lyrical storytelling.” Morgenstern has declared that “he was no ordinary man, and the music he made was no ordinary music. He was a poet; his recorded solos have a poignant lyricism of their own.” Come hear and witness the proof, as Loren Schoenberg and his venerable guests delve into the archives of their memory and record collections.

National Jazz Museum in Harlem Events

Two brilliant pianists sparkle across the Jazz Museum’s transom this week. Toshiko Akiyoshi joins us for an extended interview at Harlem Speaks about her fabled career as an influential bandleader/composer. And Onaje Alan Gumbsjoins us for Harlem in the Himalayas in a sublime concert setting along with bassist Avery Sharpe.  
 
Add to that our weekly Jazz for Curious Listeners, which focuses on jazz on film in the 1930’s (Ellington, Billie Holiday, Goodman, Lunceford for starters) and you’ve got a typically exciting menu of jazz to contemplate.


Tuesday, March 10, 2009
Jazz for Curious Listeners

Jazz on Film: The '3Os
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | 
register online

Known as the “Swing Era” by historians of jazz, the 1930s heralded the primacy of the big band in American popular culture. Orchestras led by Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Benny Goodman, the Dorsey Brothers and Cab Calloway, among others, gave millions a soundtrack for the period, as radio shows spread the joy of jazz across the nation. But jazz was also caught on film, as this evening’s discussion and videos will make abundantly clear. 
 
Thursday, March 12, 2009
Harlem Speaks

Toshiko Akiyoshi, pianist
6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more info: 212-348-8300

Toshiko Akiyoshi's unique contributions to the jazz world have evolved like falling dominoes through a series of events that started with a piano-loving little Japanese girl in Manchuria and brought her to prominence as an unparalleled pianist, composer and leader of the Toshiko Akiyoshi Jazz Orchestra. 
Akiyoshi's interest in the piano started at age six, and by the time her family had moved back to Japan at the end of World War II.  She had developed a real love for music, and soon began playing piano professionally, which eventually led to her being discovered by pianist Oscar Peterson in 1952 during a Norman Granz Jazz at the Philharmonic tour of Japan. On Peterson’s recommendation, Toshiko recorded for Granz, and not long after, she went to the U.S. to study at the Berklee School of Music in Boston.

Her years in Boston, and later on in New York, developed her into a first class pianist. Her interest in composing and arranging came to fruition when she moved to Los Angeles in 1972 with her husband, saxophonist/flutist Lew Tabackin. The following year they formed the world-renowned big band that became known as the Toshiko Akiyoshi Jazz Orchestra featuring Lew Tabackin. The band, which began as a vehicle for Toshiko's own compositions, grew in stature during its 10 years on the west coast and gained a reputation as one of the most excellent and innovative big bands in jazz. In 1976 the band placed first in the Down Beat Critics' Poll and her album, Long Yellow Road, was named best jazz album of the year by Stereo Review. 

In 1982 the couple returned to New York, where Toshiko reformed her band with New York musicians, In 1983 the new Toshiko Akiyoshi Jazz Orchestra featuring Lew Tabackin had a critically successful debut at Carnegie Hall as part of the Kool Jazz Festival. That same year a documentary film by Renee Cho depicting the Akiyoshi/Tabackin move from L.A. to New York was released, entitled "Jazz is My Native Language" (Rhapsody Video).

Toshiko recorded 18 albums with the Jazz Orchestra, garnering 14 Grammy Award nominations since 1976. The band was also voted #1 in Down Beat magazine's Best Big Band category, and Toshiko has placed first in the Best Arranger and Composer category in the Down Beat Readers' Poll, making her the first woman in the history of jazz to have been so honored.

Toshiko realized a long time dream in 1996 when she completed her autobiography. "Life With Jazz." The book is now in its third printing in Japanese and will soon be translated into Korean. 

The Orchestra followed the great Duke Ellington tradition of using each musician's individual sound and style as an integral part of the ensemble's musical identity. To this Akiyoshi adds her own complex, boppish lines and contemporary colors and textures, mingled with elements of her Asian roots to produce a sound that has no equal in jazz.

Summing up her own career, Toshiko, with characteristic modesty commented in an interview with the San Bernardino Sun, "I would hope that my work might have more substance and more quality rather than quantity of notes. And I hope the notes I produce today are more selective than 20 years ago."

Friday, March 13, 2009

Harlem in the Himalayas
Onaje Allan Gumbs with Avery Sharpe
7:00pm
Location: Rubin Museum of Art
(150 West 17th Street)
$18 in advance | $20 at door | 
Box Office: 212.620.5000 ext. 344

Onaje Allan Gumbs, a guest of Harlem Speaks in July 2007, is one of the industry’s most respected and talented musical collaborators. He has worked for more than 30 years with an illustrious list of jazz, R&B and pop artists. In 1974, he created a special arrangement of “Stella By Starlight” for the New York Jazz Repertory Company as part of a concert honoring Miles Davis at Carnegie Hall. He followed that with live and recorded performances with such artists as Lenny White, Buster Williams, Cecil McBee and Betty Carter. In 1975, Onaje joined forces with trumpeter, Nat Adderley as part of his quintet contributing to the group’s releases on Atlantic and Steeplechase Records. Producer Nils Winter of Steeplechase upon hearing Onaje’s improvisations, invited the young pianist to record a solo piano project entitled Onaje.

In 1976, he provided the arrangement for the song that was to become the signature piece for the late great vocalist Phyllis Hyman, “Betcha By Golly Wow.” In 1978, the Woody Shaw Group, for which Onaje was pianist, won the Down Beat Reader’s Poll for Best Jazz Group and for Best Jazz Album (Rosewood).The album was later nominated for a Grammy. In 1985, Onaje lent his keyboard and arrangement skills to “Lady In My Life” on guitarist Stanley Jordan’s widely acclaimed debut album, Magic Touch on Blue Note Records.This was the first jazz album in history to maintain the #1 spot atop Billboard Magazine’s jazz charts for more than 50 weeks.

In 1986, Onaje received the “Min-on Art Award”...”in recognition of his great contribution to the promotion and development of a new musical movement for people with the aim of the creation of Peace...” Previous recipients of this prestigious honor include Tina Turner, Herbie Hancock, Wayne Shorter, and Buster Williams. Motivated by the goal for World Peace, Onaje uses the practice of Nicherin Daishonin’s Buddhism as a philosophical, spiritual and technical approach to his life and his music. 

Onaje Allan Gumbs, whose most recent recording is titled “Sack Full of Dreams,” continues to contribute his talents as a keyboardist, composer, arranger and producer. As he states: “Music has a healing force that is immeasurable and I am committed to being a part of it.” 

Bassist Avery Sharpe was born in Valdosta, Georgia on August 23, 1954. His first instrument was the piano. “I started playing when I was eight years old,” he recalls. “My mother was a piano player in the Church of God in Christ, and she gave lessons to everybody in the family — I'm the sixth of eight children — but it didn't stick until it got to me.” He moved on to accordion and then switched to electric bass in high school. 

In 1972, Sharpe enrolled at the University of Massachusetts, where he majored in Economics and minored in music, and continued to play electric bass in gospel, funk, and rock groups. While at UMass, he met the jazz bassist Reggie Workman, who encouraged him to learn the acoustic bass. Sharpe adapted quickly to the big instrument, and within a few years he was performing with such notables as Archie Shepp and Art Blakey. Shepp and Max Roach, his professors at the time, had a major influence on him. Sharpe also performed in orchestra and chamber groups at UMass, and completed one year of graduate school in Music Performance. In 1980, he auditioned with McCoy Tyner and won a spot in the pianist's group. He has worked with Tyner almost continuously since then, playing hundreds of live gigs and appearing on more than 20 records with him. 

Sharpe's credits also include sideman stints with many other jazz greats, from Dizzy Gillespie to Pat Metheny, as well as leading his own groups. His first recording as a leader was the 1988 album Unspoken Words on Sunnyside Records, which was praised by critic Jim Roberts as “a diverse, challenging record that rewards repeated listening.” In 1994, he recorded Extended Family, the first CD of a trilogy released on Sharpe's own label, JKNM Records. 

In 1989, he wrote and conducted the soundtrack for the movie An Unremarkable Life; a decade later, his six-movement piece America's Promise debuted in a concert-hall performance that featured Sharpe's quintet and a gospel choir backed by the Springfield (Mass.) Symphony Orchestra. In the 1990's Sharpe was commissioned by the Classical group Fideleo to write 3 extended works for them. 

Regardless of the setting, Avery Sharpe always brings both exceptional musical skill and unswerving honesty to the endeavor. His duo performance with Onaje Allan Gumbs promises to render the immeasurable healing and empowering wonder of jazz.

                   ______________________________________________

Visitors Center
104 East 126th Street, Suite 2C
Monday through Friday 10 a.m. - 4 p.m
close to 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 trains to 125th Street

We’re waiting for you! Yes, that’s right. Our new Visitors Center is now open Monday through Friday (10 a.m. – 4 p.m.) and chock full of books, CDs and DVDs for your perusal. There is also a first-class exhibit of photos on the walls, so we hope you will come up and see us and also spread the word to any other curious folk who want to spend some time getting jazzed in Harlem.
Also, to find audio and video clips, event summaries, program updates and photographs galore from our previous events, venture here:

http:///www.jazzmuseuminharlem.org

The National Jazz Museum Events | February 16 - 21

Forrest

As a young man in Los Angeles, Drummer Forrest "Chico" Hamilton was entranced by Count Basie's band, especially his drummer Jo Jones, and the band's featured soloists, tenormen Lester Young and Herschel Evans. Join us for this week's  Jazz for Curious Listeners dedicated to Evans, the soulful titan of the Texas tenor. Chico Hamilton, still going strong as he approaches 90, is leading his famous band at Friday's Harlem in the HImilayas. We conclude the week on Sunday when the JAZZ MUSEUM IN HARLEM ALL-STAR BIG BAND joins the celebration of African-American Heritage Day at the Museum of Natural History.

Tuesday, February 17, 2009

Jazz for Curious Listeners
Herschel Evans
with Loren Schoenberg

7:00 – 8:30pm         
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | Reservations: 212-348-8300 or register online

Join us for an evening celebrating one of the lesser known giants of jazz, the earliest "Texas tenors," Herschel Evans, whose soulful sound was a perfect contrast to that of the cool-toned Lester Young in the Count Basie Orchestra. Evans started out playing in territory bands, including Troy Floyd (1929-1931) with whom he made his recording debut, and Benny Moten (1933-1935). In 1936, Evans had stints with Lionel Hampton and in Los Angeles and then joined Count Basie just in time to enjoy the band's success and participate on many recordings; his most famous solo was on a ballad feature "Blue and Sentimental" from 1938. Sadly, Herschel Evans died of a heart ailment before his 30th birthday.

He may be gone, but certainly not forgotten, as you'll discover!

Friday, February 20, 2009

Harlem in the Himalayas
Chico Hamilton
7:00pm
Location: Rubin Museum of Art
(150 West 17th Street)
$18 in advance | $20 at door |
Box Office: 212.620.5000 ext. 344

Chico Hamilton, drums
Cary DeNigris, guitar
Paul Ramsey, bass
Evan Schwam, flute, tenor & soprano saxophones
Eddie Barbash, flute, soprano & alto saxophones
Jeremy Carlstedt, percussion 

Legendary jazz drummer and bandleader Chico Hamilton, born September 21, 1921 in Los Angeles, had a fast track musical education in a band with his schoolmates Charles Mingus, Illinois Jacquet, Ernie Royal, Dexter Gordon, Buddy Collette and Jack Kelso. Engagements with Lionel Hampton, Slim & Slam, T-Bone Walker, Lester Young, Count Basie, Duke Ellington, Charlie Barnett, Billy Eckstine, Nat King Cole, Sammy Davis Jr., Billie Holiday, Gerry Mulligan and six years with Lena Horne established this young West Coast prodigy as a jazz drummer on the rise, before he struck out on his own as a bandleader in 1955.

Chico's impact upon jazz includes the introduction of two unique and distinct sounds: first in 1955 with his Original Quintet which combined the sounds of his drums, the bass of Carson Smith, the guitar of Jim Hall, the cello of Fred Katz, and the flute of Buddy Collette; and the second in 1962 with his own drums, the bass of Albert Stinson, the guitar of Gabor Szabo, the tenor sax of Charles Lloyd, and the trombone of George Bohanon.

In 1997, Chico received the New School University Jazz & Contemporary Music Programs Beacons in Jazz Award in recognition for his "significant contribution to the evolution of Jazz". In 2002, Chico was awarded the WLIU-FM Radio Lifetime Achievement Award. At the IAJE in NYC January 2004, Hamilton was awarded a NEA Jazz Master Fellowship, presented to him by Roy Haynes. In December 2006, Congress confirmed the President's nomination of Chico to the Presidents Council on the Arts. And in 2007, Chico received a Living Legacy Jazz Award as part of The Kennedy Centers Jazz in Our Time Festival, as well as receiving a Doctor of Fine Arts from The New School.

Still swingin' at the age of 86, Chico Hamilton has a resume that includes scores for film, original compositions, commercial jingles, 50 + albums as a leader, and countless international tours. Come witness a living legend in collaboration with his young ensemble members, heard on Hamilton's most recent recordings, "Chico Hamilton Trio!," "The Alternative Dimensions of El Chico," and "It's About Time!"
Friday, February 21, 2009

Special Event
African-American Heritage Day
1:00 – 5:00pm
Location: American Museum of Natural History
(Central Park West @ 79th Street | get directions
Free with Museum admission

The National Jazz Museum All Star Big Band will be performing as part of

HARLEM SERENADE: A MOMENT IN TIME

This event is co-produced by Community Works and the New Heritage Theatre Group.
           
"A" Train to the Harlem Renaissance
 
Performance • 1:00-2:45 pm, Kaufmann Theater, first floor
 
Artistic Director and host James Stovall narrates an afternoon of musical performances by the All-Star Orchestra of the National Jazz Museum in Harlem.
 
The Jazz Orchestra will be joined by members of the Silver Belles – 2nd Generation, a group of exceptional senior female dancers inspired by the original Silver Belles, who appeared in the choruses of the prestigious Cotton Club and Apollo Theater during Harlem's heyday. Also joining them will be the Jitterbug Kids, a group of young dancers who recapture Harlem's Swing era. The performances will be woven together with classic film clips from Harlem's Golden Era.

Jazz Appreciation Series Features Tyner, Frisell, Smith & Scofield

John Scofield - photo by Sanjay Suchak- for the Grateful Web

Brilliant "sheets of sound" pianist, member of legendary John Coltrane Quartet.

Boulder Theater and Jazz89 KUVO present the Jazz Appreciation Series in celebration of April Jazz Appreciation Month with Dr. Lonnie Smith Trio, Bill Frisell Trio featuring Rudy Royston and Tony Scherr, McCoy Tyner and John Scofield's Piety Street Band featuring George Porter Jr., Jon Cleary and Ricky Fataar.

It is not an overstatement to say that modern jazz has been shaped by the music of McCoy Tyner. His blues-based piano style, replete with sophisticated chords and an explosively percussive left hand has transcended conventional styles to become one of the most identifiable sounds in improvised music. His harmonic contributions and dramatic rhythmic devices form the vocabulary of a majority of jazz pianists.

At 17 he began a career-changing relationship with Miles Davis' sideman saxophonist John Coltrane. Tyner joined Coltrane for the classic album My Favorite Things (1960), and remained at the core of what became one of the most seminal groups in jazz history, The John Coltrane Quartet. The band, which also included drummer Elvin Jones and bassist Jimmy Garrison, had an extraordinary chemistry, fostered in part by Tyner's almost familial relationship with Coltrane.

In 1965 Tyner broke out as a leader and has since released nearly 80 albums under his name, earned four Grammys and was awarded Jazz Master from the National Endowment for the Arts in 2002. He continues to leave his mark on generations of improvisers, and yet remains a disarmingly modest and spiritually directed man.

Dr. Lonnie Smith is an authentic Master of the Hammond B3 organ. For over five decades he has furthered the sound of Jazz Organ, created a worldwide fan-base, and revealed his musical talents on over seventy albums. Today, his name is truly synonymous with the instrument. Lonnie Smith has consistently been a leading force in jazz since 1969 when critics for Downbeat magazine hailed him as 'Top Organist of 1969.' More recently he has been selected as 'Organ Keyboardist of the Year' by The Jazz Journalist Association in 2003, 2004 and 2005.

Guitarist, composer and band leader Bill Frisell explores the musical possibilities of his own multi-faceted compositions and time-honored jazz and folk songs with this ever-evolving constellation of extraordinary musicians. Bill Frisell Trio features Denver-raised percussionist Rudy Royston and bassist Tony Scherr.

John Scofield's Piety Street Band features John Scofield (guitar), Jon Cleary (keyboards) George Porter Jr. (bass) and Ricky Fataar (drums). In introducing this all new group for 2009, John forges a connection from jazz to blues to gospel. "I've always wanted to record and tour a blues project...that's where I started as a guitarist and I'm feeling that music more than ever of late. My jazz is funky, my funk is jazzy and R&B flavors run through it. I'm just shifting the balance for this one and I am really excited to be making music with Jon Cleary (Boonie Raitt), the legendary George Porter, Jr. (The Meters) and Ricky Fataar (Bonnie Raitt, Beach Boys)."  Inspired by the songs of Thomas A. Dorsey and Mahalia Jackson, John Scofield's Piety Street Band has all the swing and blues needed to finally make a real jazz/funk fusion project.

An Evening with McCOY TYNER @ the Boulder Theater
Tuesday, April 28
doors: 6:30pm, show: 7:30pm
Reserved=$38.00, GA seated=$29.50

An Evening with the DR. LONNIE SMITH TRIO @ the Boulder Theater
Wednesday, April 1
doors: 7:00pm, show: 8:00pm
Reserved=$34.50, GA seated=$29.00 / 21+

An Evening with the BILL FRISELL TRIO @ the Boulder Theater
ft. Rudy Royston & Tony Scherr
Tuesday, April 7
doors: 6:30pm, show: 7:30pm
Reserved=$32.00, GA seated=$25.00 / All Ages

An Evening with the JOHN SCOFIELD'S PIETY STREET BAND @ the Boulder Theater
ft. George Porter Jr., Jon Cleary & Ricky Fataar
Wednesday, April 29
doors: 7:00pm, show: 8:00pm
GA / 21+ / $34.00

Tickets sold separately to each show

Beat Kaestli at Smoke Jazz Club - NYC, Feb. 8th

Beat Kaestli- for the Grateful Web

On Sunday, February 8th, Beat Kaestli is returning to Smoke Jazz Club (sets @ 6 & 7pm). Smoke is one of NYC premier Jazz venues with a great atmosphere and a delicious food and drink menu- perfect to listen to Jazz and enjoy a great meal. Please call for reservations - space is limited.
- -
Beat Kaestli Quartet @ Smoke Jazz Club, NYC
feat. Aria Hendricks (voc) and Adrian Mira (sax)
Sunday, February 8th - 2 sets 6 & 7pm
2751 Broadway (between 105/106 st)
212 864 6662 | www.smokejazz.com
Cover: $5 ($20 min @ tabels)
Directions: 1/9 train to 103rd st

Line up:
Beat Kaestli - voice
John Chin - piano
Michael O'Brian - bass
Russ Pederson - drums
feat. Aria Hendricks and Adrian Mira

Cape May Jazz Festival April 17-19, 2009

James Cotton- for the Grateful Web

The 31st Cape May Jazz Festival "Legends….and more Blues" April 17-19 2009 presented by NJ Division of Travel and Tourism and Bank of America opens featuring a Tribute to Billy Eckstine and Sarah Vaughn with "Have a Song on Me Celebrating Mr. B" and the Big Band Music of the 40s and 50s with the B Swingers Big Band and Steve Butler. Billy Eckstine, known as Mr. B, became the most influential ballad singer during this era with an appealing baritone voice.  It has been said Steve Butler "looks and sounds hauntingly similar to Billy Eckstine…capable and convincing" and the Big Band one of the best.  Sabrina Carten is convincing honoring Sarah Vaughn.

More Blues Saturday night with Grammy Award winner James "Superharp" Cotton whose pedigree is a veritable who's who in the world of Blues. Cotton and his Blues Band continue to showcase his immense talent and keep him one of the most sought-after, hard-driving blues musicians touring the world today.  More Blues continues all weekend at Cabanas with Andrew Jr. Boy Jones, Eddie Shaw and the Wolf Gang, Alan Weber and Frenz and Juke Joints Last Stand.

Legendary Odean Pope, known for his fiery, often intense solos, dazzling elevations and throbbing, husky sounds, opens Aleatheas Restaurant at the Inn of Cape May for an 8:30pm Jazz Dinner and late Show with open seating available.  Pope worked with Max Roach for many years and permanently joined the Max Roach Quartet in 1979.  Barbara King will continue the legends with a Tribute to Sarah Vaughn. "Barbara King's dusky, Sarah Vaughn-like qualities mark her as a talent to watch" says Lloyd Sachs, Chicago Sun-Times.  Enjoying a mix of family background cultures from Cuba, Jamaica and Costa Rica and surrounded by music and dancing, Barbara was introduced at an early age to jazz legends such as Sarah, Ella, Dinah and Billie who influence her singing.

Opening up Carneys Main Room Saturday night, Cuban percussionist Mayra Casales brings her band "Women on Fire" with Cuban Francois Zayas, drums. Born in Cuba, raised in Miami her earlier influences began with the Afro-Cuban musical culture of her surroundings.  Her fiery, heartfelt spirit with strong roots in Cuban music is always present.  Mayra is a versatile vocalist, percussionist, arranger, lyricist and composer who is considered one of the most complete percussionists of our time.

DC Sharon Clark returns by popular demand for the Jazz Dinner and late show in Aleatheas Saturday night.  Sharon is an amazing, exceptionally gifted  talent having performed at the Kennedy Center, Blues Alley, with the Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra and for President Bill Clinton and can be seen weekly in clubs and hotels in the DC area.  Her performances include jazz standards but also lesser known songs performed by Ella, Sarah, Johnny Hartman and Nancy Wilson.

Woody and Carol saw Roni Ben-Hur in NYC and knew he was a must for the festival.  He is a very charming, talented guitarist and composer offering creative melodies, brilliant solos and dazzling original compositions.  As a leader he has won high praise from jazz critics around the world.  Gary Giddins describes Ben-Hur  "as eloquent as a cool breeze, this understated exercise in bebop equilibrium goes down so easy you might underestimate the magic.  A limber and inventive guitarist….keeps the modernist flame alive and pure with a low flame burning in every note."

Sylvia Cuenca opens Carneys Main Room Friday night with her organ quartet.  Sylvia swings impeccably with her authentic feel for the Latin genre.  Originally a sideman who performed with almost everyone around the NYC area, her band performs in clubs and festivals in the US and around the world. Performing in the Boiler Room at Congress Hall Saturday night, the Michael Thomas Quintet is a powerful and energetic group that is deeply rooted in the rich tradition of hard-bop and blues with Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers their major influence.

Along with the usual high energy jams Saturday and Sunday in Carneys, the complimentary workshops and CD Signing Party, Juke Joints Last Stand will be in Cabanas Sunday afternoon.
This is a fun, stimulating band with a juke joint jamming feel that is mainly blues - a not to be missed experience.

The schedule, musician's information and sounds bytes are found on the web.  For more information or to be put on the mailing list please call 609-884-7277.  An All Event Weekend Pass to attend 18 events beginning 8pm Friday through 4pm Sunday is $150 general admission. Individual Friday or Saturday Night All Event Wristbands are $55.  Saturday afternoon Jam wristbands are $35, Sunday Jams $25. Reserved Seating is available at the Theatre at Lower Regional High School for an additional $25pp. Complimentary Festival Transportation running every 10 minutes is available between venues all weekend.

The 31st Cape May Jazz Festival is presented by New Jersey Department of State Division of Travel and Tourism VisitNJ.Com and Bank of America and sponsored by the Delaware River and Bay Authority, Barefoot Wines, Jazz Times, WRTI Temple Public Radio, WBGO Jazz 88, WCFA 101.5, WTTH the Touch, Cape May Star and Wave, Verizon Wireless with generous support from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts/Department of State, a partner agency of the National Endowment for the Arts, the New Jersey Cultural Trust, local businesses and donors.

Mark Murphy Jan. 22-25 At The Iridium Jazz Club

Mark Murphy- for the Grateful Web

Mark Murphy is one of the world's greatest - and hippest - jazz vocalists performing today.
 
His coterie of fans includes tap dancer Gregory Hines, who spontaneously jumped up on stage at Mark's Las Vegas engagement in 1995 to join him for an impromptu duet. Legendary composer Alec Wilder said of Mark, 'I was quite literally amazed. Mark's musicianship, range, intonation, diction, inventiveness and incredible rhythmic sense are all of a piece and all marvelous.' Vocal greats Betty Carter, Peggy Lee, Cleo Laine and Shirley Horn all sing Murphy's praises as one of the best in he business and the legendary Ella Fitzgerald declared 'he is my equal.'
 
A six-time Grammy nominee, Mark Murphy has enjoyed a prolific 40-year recording career, with over 40 releases to date. His original lyrics to 'Stolen Moments,' 'Red Clay' and more are known the world over. His innovative projects range from the work of Nat 'King' Cole to Jack Kerouac to Ivan Lins to Eddie Jefferson. Stereo Review dubs Mark 'one of the major artists of our age.' Mark Murphy is a jazz singer. 'For decades the question 'What exactly is a jazz singer' 'has had two easy answers, Betty Carter. And Mark Murphy.' writes the New York Post. 'He is arguably the best male jazz singer in the business,' declares Rex Reed.

'Mark Murphy is to jazz singing what Bobby Fisher is to chess.' Jazz journalist Dan Morgenstern writes, 'I can't help relishing his sure and swinging time, his musical and ever-inventive phrasing and that certain quality of sound and feeling combined with time and taste that to me spells jazz.'

MARK MURPHY

Jan. 22-25

At the IRIDIUM JAZZ CLUB

1650 BROADWAY (Corner of 51st)

NEW YORK, NY 10023

RESERVATIONS: 212-582-2121

Sets At 8:30 & 10:30PM

Blue Train Revisited This Weekend At The Iridium Jazz Club

Coltrane''s Blue Train- for the Grateful Web

The most enduring of the dozen or so records made by John Coltrane in 1957, Blue Train was John Coltrane's sole recording for the legendary Blue Note label.  The sextet setting allying the tenor giant with trumpeter Lee Morgan and trombonist Curtis Fuller has gone on to become one of the most popular entries in the Coltrane discography.  Curtis Fuller, the only trombonist to record in a Coltrane led band, returns to recreate the classic sound of the group with young veterans Terell Stafford and Javon Jackson filling out the frontline and an all-star rhythm section of George Cables, Lonnie Plaxico and Andrew Cyrille.

 

IRIDIUM JAZZ CLUB
1650 BROADWAY (Corner of 51st)
NEW YORK, NY 10023
RESERVATIONS: 212-582-2121
http://www.iridiumjazzclub.com/
Sets At 8:30 & 10:30PM

 

Jacob Fred Jazz Odyssey Announce New Lineup & Jan./Feb. Tour Dates

JACOB FRED JAZZ ODYSSEY- for the Grateful Web

Jacob Fred Jazz Odyssey are very pleased to announce a revamped lineup for 2009.  The odyssey continues with Brian Haas on keys, Josh Raymer on drums, and proudly introducing new members Chris Combs on guitar and lap steel and Matt Hayes on bass.  The reconfigured band made its debut on New Year's Eve to an elated sold out crowd in Tulsa, Oklahoma. They'll make their next apperance this coming Saturday, January 10th in New York City as part of the 2009 Winter Jazzfest.

JFJO would also like to wish their best to founding member of 15-years, Reed Mathis, as 2009 will find him exploring other musical endeavors.

JFJO has a handful of dates in January, returning to old haunts like Denton, Fayetteville, and Kansas City.  February will then find the band on a full West Coast tour, brought to fans by Aurora Innovations, beginning what promises to be another year of musical evolution.

Upcoming tour dates for Jacob Fred Jazz Odyssey are:

January 10 / Winter Jazzfest / New York, NY
January 17 / Hailey's / Denton, TX (w/ Snarky Puppy)
January 29 / George's Majestic / Fayetteville, AR (w/ The Doldrums)
January 30 / Jardine's / Kansas City, MO (w/ The Doldrums)
January 31 / Mojo's / Columbia, MO (w/ The Doldrums)
February 10 / Winston's / San Diego, CA (w/ The Bridge)
February 11 / Largo / Los Angeles, CA (w/ Marco Benevento)
February 12 / Yoshi's / Oakland, CA
February 13 / Hopmonk Tavern / Sebastopol, CA (w/The Bridge)
February 14 / Venue TBA / Humboldt, CA
February 18 / Indigo / Eugene, OR (w/ The Bridge)
February 20 / Eastside / Olympia, WA
February 21 / The Goodfoot / Portland, OR
February 22 / Tractor Tavern / Seattle, WA
February 25 / Hodi's Half Note / Fort Collins, CO (w/ Mike Dillon's Go-Go Jungle)
February 27 / B-Side Lounge / Boulder, CO
February 28 / Cervante's / Denver, CO
March 28 / The Parish / Austin, TX

Marco Granados Winner Best Latin Jazz Flautist of 2008

Marco Granados- for the Grateful Web

Marco Granados and Un Mundo Ensemble perform music from their homeland, Venezuela. Venezuelan music is characterized by fast melodies, complex syncopated rhythms, and jazzy harmonies that blend the traditions of African, European and native cultures with sense of sophistication that is truly unique. A lot of Un Mundo's arrangements are virtuosic, giving the performers the opportunity to display mastery of their instruments. The different styles performed by the ensemble represent the typical forms most commonly enjoyed by the Venezuelan listener. These styles include: the Joropo, the Merengue, the Tonada, the Gaita, and the Valse (or Waltz).