jazz

ELECTION NIGHT JAZZ -The Shaynee Rainbolt Quartet

Shaynee Rainbolt- for the Grateful Web

Swingin' Jazz for the Bipartisan-Curious

Featuring:  
The Shaynee Rainbolt Quartet

Shaynee Rainbolt, Vocals
Barry Levitt, Piano
Tom Hubbard, Bass
Ray Marchica, Drums

Special Guests Include:

Great American Songbook composer/lyricist Ervin Drake ('Perdido','I Believe",'It Was a Very Good Year','Good Morning Heartache')

MAC and Bistro Award Winning Vocalist: Terese Genecco

MTV, Here TV, and host of the Acclaimed NYC variety/comedy show 'On The Rocks,' Comedian: Danny Leary

IRIDIUM JAZZ CLUB
1650 BROADWAY (Corner of 51st)
NEW YORK, NY 10023
RESERVATIONS: 212-582-2121
http://www.iridiumjazzclub.com/
Sets At 8:30 & 10:30PM

Tuesday, November 4th, 2008

Cachaca Jazz Featuring The Todd Marcus Jazz Orchestra

Todd Marcus- for the Grateful Web

"... one of the finest [CDs] to come out in late 2006.  Thank god I made time to listen to [the] disc among the ad nauseum cookie-cutter singer records I had to review. [The] music was a fabulous ear and brain cleaner. We dug the freshness of the approach...Truly refreshing in a world of sameness."   - - Linda Yohn, WEMU Music Director

"Todd Marcus shows a lot of promise with his exciting recording debut as a leader."  - - All Music

"[Marcus] was self taught as an arranger and player. In one respect you'd never guess this was the case, for his music is organized, balanced and mature. On the other hand, there is a fire, which resonates on this recording. His bass clarinet playing has an original sound, and his arranging has a style of his own…[The band's] energy is awesome and the ensemble has a bright future.  - - Rich Holland, Jazz Radio 247.com

"Marcus…brings a saxophonic rigor to the bass clarinet while also generating enough sonic power to front a nine-piece ensemble…With his melodic imagination and technical aptitude on an unorthodox horn, Marcus has something truly new and personal to offer."  - - David R. Adler, contributing writer, Jazz Times 

"Once you know who Todd Marcus is and what his music is you learn that you have found something special.  He writes beautiful music, and he and his orchestra have the magic touch…"  - - Music Monthly

"While the bass clarinet has been used often since Dolphy, it is typically used by a saxophonist or clarinetist as a second or third instrument…Very few performers have used the instrument exclusively, but one such performer is the Baltimore-based American musician and bandleader Todd Marcus."  - - Wikipedia

"Excellent bass clarinetist, composer."  - - Baltimore Sun

Cachaca @ 35 West 8th Street · Greenwich Village · New York, NY 10011 · 212.388.9099

Monday, November 3rd, sets at 10:30pm and midnight

Todd Marcus  (bass clarinet/compositions), 
Russell Kirk (alto), Jacob Yoffee (tenor), Lyle Link (alto/flute), 
Theljon Allen (trumpet), Alan Ferber (trombone), 
Joel Holmes (piano), Gavin Fallow (bass), McClenty Hunter (drums)

National Jazz Museum in Harlem November Schedule

Thelonious Monk- for the Grateful Web

The National Jazz Museum in Harlem's first event in November 2008 takes place a week after the presidential election, focusing on The World of Thelonious Monk for Jazz for Curious Listeners.
 
Now in its fifth year, the Harlem Speaks interview series continues strongly this month, with relaxed talks with photographer and producer Hank O'Neal and educator and drummer Justin DiCioccio. Best-selling author and jazz musician James McBride comes through to the Visitor's Center for Jazz for Curious Readers.
 
Live performance takes no back seat, as Harlem in the Himalayas presents several concerts boding experimental approaches (see details below.) 
 
If you've attended any of our events, or even have read our weekly and monthly press releases, you know that most of our programming is free to the public. Please consider giving your financial support to the National Jazz Museum in Harlem at our Gala 2008 fundraiser on November 25, 2008. 
 
That way, we can continue sharing the legacy and contemporary value of jazz, and keep swingin'!
 
Tuesday, November 11, 2008
Jazz for Curious Listeners
The World of Thelonious Monk: The Minton's Years
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | register online
            
In the 1940s pianist and composer Thelonious Sphere Monk was a house pianist at Minton's uptown in Harlem, a hotbed locale for the adventurous sound style that became known as bebop. Way before his wider popularity and critical recognition, his tenure at Minton's established his reputation among his musician peers, some of whom even questioned his approach. One man whose imprimatur stood Monk in good stead during this period was Coleman Hawkins, the "father" of the jazz tenor saxophone. 
 
Thursday, November 13, 2008
Harlem Speaks
Hank O'Neal, Author/producer
6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | Reservations: 212-348-8300

His mother, Sarah Christian O'Neal was a musically and intellectually inclined housewife from Tyler, Texas.. His father was a professional soldier and educator in the US Army in Texas and the Pacific (1929-1947) and, following World War II, an educator and public school superintendent in upstate New York (1953-72). O'Neal was raised throughout Texas, primarily, and Syracuse, NY. After first attending Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, he graduated from Syracuse University in 1962.

In 1960 O'Neal was introduced to a representative of the CIA and ultimately accepted employment with that organization. He reported for duty in January 1963 and remained with the CIA in Washington D.C. and New York City until 1976. He served in the US Army during the same period (1962-1967), rising to the rank of Captain. The nature of his employment allowed him the flexibility of pursuing other interests during these years.

During a forty year career in music, he formed two record companies, Chiaroscuro Records and Hammond Music Enterprises, built two recordings studios (WARP and Downtown Sound), produced over 200 jazz LPs/CDs and - in conjunction with his business partner, Shelley M. Shier and their production company, HOSS, Inc. - over 100 music festivals (The Floating Jazz Festival, The Blues Cruise, Mardi Gras At Sea, Big Bands At Sea and others from 1983-2002), published a number of books and articles on jazz, photographed most of the giants of jazz from the second half of the 20th Century, exhibited these photographs regularly and served on the boards of various non-profit organizations that serve the jazz community, including the Jazz and Contemporary Music Program of The New School (1985 to present), the Jazz Foundation of America (1993 to present) and more recently The Jazz Gallery (1995 to present).

As a photographer, O'Neal didn't begin to pursue photography seriously until 1969 when he acquired a professional camera and began documenting recording sessions and jazz concerts he was producing. Long before Berenice Abbott admonished him to always have a project, he undertook his first, in rural East Texas during the years 1970-1973. These photographs led to his first exhibition in September 1973, at The Open Mind Gallery in New York City.

In the 1970s he became friendly and associated with a diverse group of photographers, notably Walker Evans, André Kertész and, most importantly, Berenice Abbott, with whom he worked for the last 19 years of her life.

Between the years 1970 and 1999, in addition to undertaking many photographic projects, O'Neal also published numerous books related to photography. In 1999, at the urging of Evelyn Daitz, the gallery director, he had a major retrospective of his work to that point at The Witkin Gallery. The focus of his activities have been more directed towards photography since then. He has had many exhibitions since that time. In 2003 his photographic career was summarized in a major profile in the New York Times.

Friday, November 14, 2008
Harlem in the Himalayas
Anat Fort and Paul Motian
7:00pm
Location: Rubin Museum of Art
(150 West 17th Street)
$18 in advance | $20 at door | 
Box Office: 212.620.5000 ext. 344

With Bill Evans, Keith Jarrett, Paul Bley, Elvis Costello, John Coltrane and Egberto Gismonti among her many formative influences, Anat Fort's music can also subtly hint at her geographical origins. Born near Tel Aviv, she studied classical piano as a child and began improvising from an early age, all the while remaining open to the many musical sounds of her environment. 

In the early 1990's, Anat came to the United States to study jazz, looking to balance a natural tendency towards freer playing with a firm grounding in the tradition. Her sojourn resulted in her self-produced debut album Peel, and commissions to write for various ensembles including chamber and chorus and orchestra. Her most recent commission was premiered at the Opera House in Tel Aviv in January 2006. Anat received two artist-in-residence grants from the Jerome Foundation as well as the Creative Connections award from Meet the Composer. A session recorded with drummer Paul Motian, with whom she's performing this evening, bassist Ed Schuller, and clarinetist Perry Robinson was brought to the attention of the legendary producer Manfred Eicher ECM Records, and the resultant CD was released in 2007 as A Long Story

An important presence on the NYC alternative jazz scene and equally highly regarded in her homeland, Anat currently splits her time between Israel and the US and performs with bassist Gary Wang and drummer Roland Schneider in her touring band, the Anat Fort Trio.

Stephen Paul Motian was born on March 25, 1931 in Providence, Rhode Island. Motian played guitar in Providence in his teens, then served a term in the US Army. On his discharge in 1954 he went to New York to study music at the Manhattan School of Music. By 1956 he was playing drums for George Wallington and Russell Jacquet. Between 1956 and 1958 he worked with Tony Scott, with whom he met the pianist Bill Evans. His work in the Evans trio (1959-64) has since achieved legendary status for its delicacy and balance. Motian also played with Oscar Pettiford, Zoot Sims and Lennie Tristano in the late 50s. In the mid-60s he worked with singers Mose Allison and Arlo Guthrie and was part of the Paul Bley trio in 1964. Motian had met Ornette Coleman's bass player Charlie Haden in 1959 and had a chance to work with him in Keith Jarrett's band with Dewey Redman (1967-76); he also joined Haden's Liberation Music Orchestra for its debut recording in 1969 and toured with the re-formed Orchestra in the 80s. In the 70s he was active in the Jazz Composers' Orchestra and played on Carla Bley's Escalator Over The Hill in 1972.

Motian emerged as a leader in 1974, since which time he has released an impressive series of albums on the ECM Records, Soul Note Records, and JMT labels that have confirmed his stature as a drummer and composer. Tribute (1974) featured Carlos Ward on alto, while Dance and Le Voyage from the late 70s boasted rare appearances by saxophonist Charles Brackeen. In the 80s, Motian began long-term associations with guitarist Bill Frisell, whose arching, tremulous interpretations of Motian's melodies are particularly sympathetic, and the inventive tenorist Joe Lovano. In the late 80s, he renewed his acquaintance with Paul Bley on a marvelous album of improvised duets (Notes), and joined with Haden and pianist Geri Allen to form one of the most thoughtful of contemporary piano trios; a guest appearance with Marilyn Crispell's trio (Live In Zurich, 1991) proved he was also at home in more exploratory modes. Motian's examination of Thelonious Monk (Monk In Motian), standards (Motian On Broadway) and his piano-less tribute to Bill Evans (1991) show a questing musical mind, still working as keenly as ever. He recorded with his Electric Bebop Band (E.B.B.B) in the 90s and into the new millennium, which included Steve Swallow and Don Alias.

Monday, November 17, 2008
Jazz for Curious Readers
James McBride
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | Reservations: 212-348-8300

James McBride is an award-winning writer and composer. His critically acclaimed memoir,The Color of Water: A Black Man's Tribute to His White Mother, explores the author's struggle to understand his biracial identity and the experience of his white, Jewish mother, who moved to Harlem, married a black man, and raised 12 children.  The Color of Water won the 1997 Anisfield-Wolf Book Award for Literary Excellence, was an ALA Notable Book of the Year, and spent more than two years on the bestseller list. Chosen by the New York Public Library as one of the 25 books of 1996 to remember, The Color of Water has sold more than 1.3 million copies in the United States alone and is now required reading at numerous colleges and high schools across the country. It has also been published in 16 languages and in more than 20 countries. 

After the success of The Color of Water, McBride turned to fiction, albeit inspired by his family's history. "My initial aim was to write a novel about a group of black soldiers who liberate a concentration camp in Eastern Europe," McBride explains on his web site. "I read lots of books and spent a lot of time researching the subject but soon came to the realization that I'm not qualified to write about the holocaust. It's too much."  So, instead, he recalled the war stories of his uncle and cousin, who served in the all-black 92nd Infantry Division, and began researching World War II in Italy - particularly the clashes between Italian Partisans and the German army. Miracle at St Anna was published in 2002. His second novel, Song Yet Sung, was published in 2008.

McBride is a former staff writer for The Washington Post, People Magazine and The Boston Globe. His work has also appeared in Essence, Rolling Stone and The New York Times. Aside from his literary honors, McBride is the recipient of several awards for his work as a composer in musical theater, including the 1996 American Arts and Letters Richard Rodgers Award, the 1996 ASCAP Richard Rodgers Horizons Award, and the American Music Festival's 1993 Stephen Sondheim Award. He has written the score for several musicals, including the highly acclaimed, award-winning show "Bobos." 

McBride, an accomplished saxophonist who has toured with renowned jazz singers and musicians, has written songs (music and lyrics) for Anita Baker, Grover Washington, Jr., Gary Burton, Silver Burdett Textbooks, and for the PBS television character "Barney." He is a graduate of New York City's public schools, studied composition at The Oberlin Conservatory of Music in Ohio, and received a Masters in journalism from Columbia University in New York at age 22. He also holds an Honorary Doctorate of Human Letters from Whitman College. He lives in Pennsylvania and is currently a Distinguished Writer-In-Residence at New York University.

Tuesday, November 18, 2008
Jazz for Curious Listeners
The World of Thelonious Monk: With Sonny Rollins and John Coltrane
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | register online

The pianist Eric Reed once said that "When you playing Monk's compositions, you're kind of playing Monk. His compositions and improvisations are completely integrated." Such is the nature of his compositions, so intertwined with his quirky, singular and ingenious style of playing and composing jazz. 

The two foremost giants of jazz tenor saxophone in the 1950s, Sonny Rollins and John Coltrane, were a part of Monk's band at signal moments in the development of their styles and careers. This promises to be a night of swingin' revelation, so don't miss it. 

Thursday, November 20, 2008
Harlem Speaks
Justin DiCioccio, Drummer/educator
6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | Reservations: 212-348-8300

Justin DiCioccio is internationally recognized as one of the foremost jazz educators of our time. In January 2001, he was inducted into the Jazz Education Hall of Fame, which took place at the 28th Annual International Association of Jazz Educators (IAJE) conference in New York City. His keen insight into the teaching of conceptual and inventive ideas has earned him the title of "the musician's teacher." His performances, guest conducting appearances, adjudications, jazz and percussion clinics and workshops are numerous and widely recognized in the professional and educational fields. 

Mr. DiCioccio was named assistant dean of Manhattan School of Music in June 2002, where he chairs the School's jazz department, a position that he has held since 1999. In addition, he has been a member of the School's jazz faculty since 1984, teaching percussion and coaching ensembles. Under his leadership, a complete restructuring of the jazz curriculum has taken place, which includes the creation of a new Jazz DMA program. His goal is to initiate and put into action the concept of the complete artist musician – performer, composer, and pedagogue – as well as the creation of working partnerships with public schools, community organizations, institutions and the music industry. He also directs international summer jazz programs in partnership with Manhattan School of Music that take place in Amsterdam, The Netherlands and at the Brevard Music Festival in North Carolina.

Mr. DiCioccio works actively in Manhattan School of Music's educational outreach program bringing jazz education to hundreds of New York City public school children. In addition, Mr. DiCioccio has initiated the creation of a jazz component to the School's already existing Preparatory Division, open to students ages 10 to 18, making Manhattan School of Music on of the few institutions in the country to offer jazz programs at the elementary, secondary, undergraduate and graduate levels.

Mr. DiCioccio serves as program director for Carnegie Hall Jazz Education and under his direction in January 2001, the Manhattan School of Music Jazz Orchestra performed at Carnegie Hall as part of its Family Concert Series. He also acts as a consultant to Wynton Marsalis and Jazz at Lincoln Center, with whom he also performs and gives clinics, as well as conductor of the Henry Mancini Summer Institute in Los Angeles, CA. He designed, developed and directed the internationally known and award-winning LaGuardia High School of the Arts jazz program, the first fully accredited secondary jazz program in the United States.

Mr. DiCioccio is the recipient of a citation from the mayor of New York for "Distinguished and Exceptional Service to Young Instrumentalists" and is currently active with the National Foundation for Advancement in the Arts, the Music for Youth Foundation and the National Foundation for Jazz Education. He is a three-time recipient of the Presidential Scholars teaching recognition award in the jazz field by the U.S. Department of Education. In May 1998, The Commission Project, in partnership with the New York City Board of Education, created the JD Award for Outstanding Service to Music in New York City Schools. The award, presented annually, recognizes and celebrates individuals who have made significant contributions to the world of music education and honored Mr. DiCioccio as its first honoree. In June 2003, Mr. DiCioccio received an Achievement Award from Downbeatmagazine.

Friday, November 21, 2008
Harlem in the Himalayas
Bern Nix and Francois Grillot
7:00pm
Location: Rubin Museum of Art
(150 West 17th Street)
$18 in advance | $20 at door | 
Box Office: 212.620.5000 ext. 344

Bern Nix has played the guitar since the age of 11. Bern studied music and graduated with a degree in music education from the Berklee College of Music. Since 1985, he has led The Bern Nix Trio. Before leading his Trio, Bern performed and recorded with Ornette Coleman from 1975 to 1987 as an original member of the Prime Time Band. The Prime Time Band recorded six albums including Dancing in Your HeadOf Human Feelings and Body Meta and performed hundreds of concerts around the world. The Bern Nix Trios first recording, Alarms and Excursions (New World Records) was released in 1993, making many top ten critics lists. Bern has performed with artists such as, Ornette Coleman, John Zorn, Marc Ribot, Elliott Sharp, Jemeel Moondoc, Ronald Shannon Jackson, James Chance, Jayne Cortez and Kip Hanrahan. Hailed as one of the greatest jazz guitarists of our time, Bern was voted among the top ten jazz guitarists in a poll by Down Beat magazine. Most recently, Bern composed and recorded the score for the feature length documentary, A James Lord Portrait. Bern has a solo album coming out this fall on Tompkins Square Records.

Francois Grillot, born in Burgundy France, began studying trumpet, then guitar and electric bass. He recorded with Edition Speciale, on RCA, touring throughout France. Other credits include recordings with Mama Bea Teckelsk (RCA) and Serge Bringolf (Strave on Musea Records). Upon moving to New York he has been playing along side a number of notable musicians including Bill Bickford, Ken Hatfield, Adam Naussbaum, Harold Danko, and Mike Clarke. In 2001 his music took a turn with collaborators Matt Lavelle, Steve Swell, Daniel Carter, Matt Maneri, Roy Campbell, Mark Edwards, Jackson Krall, Lou Grassi, Jason Kwang, Robert Dick, Daniel Levin, William Hooker, Charles Burnham, Louie Belogenis, Bern Nix, Michael Marcus, Ken Filiano and a many others

Tuesday, November 25, 2008
Special Event
Gala 2008 Fundraiser
6:30 – 9:30pm
Location: Players Club
(16 Gramercy Park South, New York, New York)
Tickets: $250 / $1000, Tables of 10: $2,500 / $10,000 | 
RSVP online

Honoring:
Representative Charles B. Rangel
Chairman, Ways and Means Committee
U.S. Congress
Lifetime Achievement Award

Dr. Billy Taylor
Pianist, Composer and Educator
Radio and Television Personality
Artistic Advisor, Kennedy Center, Washington D.C.
Lifetime Achievement Award

Music by:
The National Jazz Museum in Harlem All-Stars
featuring Junior Mance, Reggie Workman,
and Dominick Farinacci

Reception: 6:30 pm
Awards: 7:30 pm
Dinner: 8:00 pm

Tuesday, November 25, 2008
Jazz for Curious Listeners
The World of Thelonious Monk: The Pianist
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | register online

Some listeners today, and even some critics back in his days, thought that Thelonious Monk wasn't a complex piano player. Yet Monk was steeped in the stride and swing piano styles of his forebears, and sprinkled his compositions and improvisations with flourishes that clearly demonstrated his prowess. In fact, Dr. Billy Taylor has informed the audience at the National Jazz Museum in Harlem, that early on Monk was an acolyte of Art Tatum, a man whose florid style can be posed as diametrically different than Monk's mature approach. 

Come get the real scoop on Thelonious Monk . . . as a pianist.

Friday, November 28, 2008
Harlem in the Himalayas
Grace Kelly
7:00pm
Location: Rubin Museum of Art
(150 West 17th Street)
$18 in advance | $20 at door | 
Box Office: 212.620.5000 ext. 344

Grace Kelly, saxophones/vocal
Jason Palmer, trumpet
Jake Sherman, piano
Evan Gregor, bass
Jordan Perlson, drums
 
Born Grace Chung on May 15, 1992 in Wellesley, Massachusetts to Korean parents, Grace moved to Brookline, MA when she was two years old with her mother and sister after her parents divorced. Grace's mother married Robert Kelly in 1997 and a few years later Grace and her sister Christina were legally adopted by her stepfather and thus her name became Grace Kelly. Grace was brought up by a family that greatly appreciates music and the arts. When she is not busy with her burgeoning musical career, Grace likes to dance, act, and hang out with her friends.  She picked up the acting bug from her sister Christina, currently a student at Harvard University.  Grace also has two stepsisters and a stepbrother: Heather, Sara and Tim. Tim was a sergeant in the Marines and served twice in the war in Iraq.

Mother Irene Chang Kelly believes that learning piano is the best way to prepare for a lifetime of music, and so Grace began piano lessons at age six. She began with classical training but soon changed to jazz because she had the propensity not to stick to the notes on the page but wanted to make up her own melodies. Grace wrote her first song "On My Way Home" at age seven.  

All public school students in Grace's hometown are required to choose an instrument and take a year of school-sponsored instruction in fourth grade, and Grace chose the clarinet.  But this fourth-grader had already gotten hooked on another sound: the warm, almost-human voice of the saxophone. Her mom always loved [saxophonist] Stan Getz and would be playing him at home when they had Sunday brunch.  Grace always wanted to play saxophone, but they didn't let you take it until fifth grade.  So she started on clarinet. Grace couldn't wait until fifth grade, so halfway through fourth grade she started private lessons on the saxophone. When Grace was 12 she met Ann Hampton Callaway, a renowned cabaret artist, prodigious recording artist and award-winning songwriter. Seeing all that Grace had accomplished in those two short years, it is no wonder that when Ann Hampton Callaway met Grace she declared of Grace that "her sensitivity, control and focus as an alto saxophonist is impressive.  When I played some songs of hers for the legendary drummer Victor Lewis [who has played with Duke Ellington, Stan Getz, and many more], he said, 'Wow, I love her sound.'"  

Grace currently studies saxophone with Jerry Bergonzi, Lee Konitz, and Allan Chase. She also studies composition, arranging, flute, drums, and piano. Having participated in the certificate programs at both Brookline Music School and the New England Conservatory Preparatory School, Grace is the youngest ever to complete the four year Jazz Studies Certificate Program at New England Conservatory Prep School.
Grace began taking voice lessons this past year although she has been singing since she could talk; her soulful, versatile voice is quickly becoming one of her trademarks whether she's crooning a love song or belting out the blues.  She has kept up with piano all of these years, but now mostly uses those skills in conjunction with her creativity to write original songs. A visit to the Kelly's proves this very quickly, for Grace is frequently trying out a new idea for a song on the piano or guitar or listening to one of her creations via Sibelius, a music notation program, connected to her keyboard.  "Grace has always had an innate creativity.  When she was younger she never really needed toys because she could make up stories, songs, and dances – entertaining herself for hours by standing in front of a mirror and performing for her own reflection.  She remembers Grace practicing piano and ten minutes later she'll be making up songs instead of practicing. She's a very creative being," remarked Mrs. Kelly.

Grace plays the alto saxophone, soprano saxophone, tenor saxophone, piano, some clarinet, flute, drums, bass and sings. The styles of music that intrigue Grace are many. Although jazz is her first love she embraces blues, funk, rock and contemporary styles. Some of the artists on Grace's nightstand are Paul Desmond, Joshua Redmond, Johnny Hodges, Duke Ellington, Miles Davis, Brad Meldau and Pat Metheny, Dave Brubeck, Lee Konitz, Phil Woods, Stevie Wonder, Paul McCartney, Billy Childs, Steve Wilson and Frank Morgan. Grace is also inspired by Ella, Sarah, Billy, Carmen McRae, Shirley Horn, Dianne Reeves, Ann Hampton Callaway, among others. Grace loves old movies and more recent romantic comedies. Some of her favorite actors are  Julia Roberts, Sandra Bullock, Hugh Grant, Tom Hanks, Meg Ryan, Orlando Bloom, Cary Grant, and of course Princess Grace Kelly.

What does the future hold for this emerging musical powerhouse?  Grace says she hopes to become better and better at playing all her instruments and to do a lot more composing and arranging. "I just want to share my music with as many people as I can, hoping that my music gives as them joy and pleasure."

Cape May Jazz Pays Tribute To Maynard Ferguson Nov 7-9

Maynard Ferguson- for the Grateful Web

November 7-9, 2008, will mark the Cape May Jazz Festival's 15th year and 30th celebration presented by Bank of America. Friday night's opener kicks off with a Tribute to Maynard Ferguson featuring a 16-piece big band led by Ed Vezinho and Jim Ward.  This performance will be held in the theatre at Lower Regional High School. Jon Faddis, internationally acclaimed high-register trumpeter, will solo with the band saluting Ferguson's music. Ferguson, jazz legend and internationally famous big band leader, was one of the world's great trumpet and brass instrument players dazzling the world with his high trumpet blasts.  Ferguson, the kid, set the jazz world on its ear with his innovation and the level of musicianship of his "Birdland Dream Band" back in the 50s.

Pieces of a Dream returns by popular demand performing on Saturday night, also in the theater.  To fill out the schedule, well-known jazz vocalist Jackie Ryan will perform in the Grand Hotel Ballroom Friday, and smooth jazz saxtress Pamela Williams will lend her talents on Saturday night.  Ex-Ferguson musician Denis DiBlasio will bring his band to Carney's on Saturday night, featuring Jim McFalls on the trombone. Also included on this bill are Michael Pedicin, Frank Bey, Edgardo Cintron, Antoinette Montague, David Cole, Bob Ferguson, the Little Jazz Giants and many more plus the always-popular high energy jam sessions and complimentary workshops.

The schedule in its entirety can be found on the web at www.capemayjazz.org, the best source for all the latest on the Cape May Jazz Festival, including music bytes from your favorite artists.  For more information or to be put on the mailing list please call 609-884-7277.

For those who wish to discover all venues and performers, the new Preferred All-Event Weekend Pass gives guests an opportunity to attend 20 jazz performances, including RESERVED SEATING at any 2 concerts at the Theatre at Lower for a special $170 (saving $30 off regular ticket pricing).  The general seating All-Event Weekend Pass is also available for $150.  Individual Friday or Saturday Night All-Event Wristbands are available for $55 each.  Saturday Afternoon Jam Wristbands are available for $35 each, and Sunday Afternoon Jam Wristbands are $25 each.  Tickets go on sale September 15th by calling 1.877.CM.JAZZ.  Information including schedules, pictures, biographies, music clips and ticket order form can be found on www.CapeMayJazz.org or by calling 609.884.7277.   Complementary Festival Transportation is available between venues Friday thru Sunday.

The 30th Cape May Jazz Festival is presented by Bank of America and sponsored by Delaware River and Bay Authority, Barefoot Wines, Yamaha Concert Division, Jazz Times, WRTI Temple University Public Radio, WBGO Jazz 88 FM, WCFA 101.5 LP, WTTH the Touch, Cape May Star & Wave, Cape May Gazette, and Verizon Wireless, with generous support from New Jersey State Council on the Arts, and supported in part by the New Jersey Department of State, Economic Growth & Tourism Commission.  Visitnj.org

Maynard Ferguson - This three time Grammy nominee, consistent Downbeat and Playboy Jazz Poll award winner, was a potent force in the world of music education, making time to personally encourage young musicians. An instrument designer, a record producer, composer, arranger, symphonic guest artist, and film soundtrack artist, Maynard Ferguson was a diverse and energetic musician whose talents far surpass trumpet player.

As might be expected, Maynard's innate musical talents were exhibited at an early age. He has been performing since he first soloed as a child prodigy with the Canadian Broadcasting Co. orchestra in 1939 when Maynard was 11 years old. Born in Montreal, Quebec in May 1928, he was encouraged by his mother, a violinist and school principal, and by age four was playing piano and violin. By nine, he had enrolled in the French Conservatory of Music where he received his formal training.

Maynard Ferguson had his own jazz and dance band at 16. All the players were twice his age except his brother, Percy. By 1948, Maynard had made his debut in the U.S. in Boyd Raeburn's band and the first of three major career periods had begun. In the 50's, he played with Charlie Barnett and Jimmy Dorsey dazzling the jazz world with his high trumpet blasts in the Stan Kenton band. After Kenton, for the next three, he was first-call studio trumpeter and recorded film soundtracks for Paramount including The Ten Commandments. Guesting with symphony conductor Leonard Bernstein in 1955, Maynard Ferguson performed the "Titans" by William Russo, with the New York Philharmonic.

"I'm a person of change and I must be honest to my artistry and my creativity. That's part of the word 'jazz'....it's an adventure."  Maynard Ferguson

WHAT:  30th Cape May Jazz Festival

WHEN:  November 7-9, 2008

WHERE: Theatre at Lower Regional High School, Grand Hotel, Carney's, Cabanas, Congress Hall Boiler Room

WHO:   Tribute to Maynard Ferguson:  Jon Faddis soloing with 16 piece orchestra directed by Ed Vezinho/Jim Ward; Pieces of a Dream, Jackie Ryan, Pamela Williams, Michael Pedicin, Chembo Corniel and Grupo Chaworo; Denis DiBlasio with Jim McFalls; Antoinette Montague with Bill Easley; Frank Bey; Edgardo Cintron; David Cole and Main Street Blues; Bob Ferguson.

The Django Reinhardt NY Festival Featuring 'The Young Lions of Gypsy Jazz 'at Birdland

Django Reinhardt- for the Grateful Web

The Django Reinhardt NY Festival carries on the legacy of the virtuoso gypsy guitarist DJANGO REINHARDT and his 'hot swing' style of playing that started a musical revolution in France and the world in the 30's and 40's when he teamed with master Jazz violinist Stephane Grappelli in the Hot Club Quintette!

The Festival, produced by Pat Philips and Ettore Stratta, goes into gear with a sizzling cast featuring young players.  Many of "The Young Lions of Gypsy Jazz" come from Europe starting with SAMSON SCHMITT from France, son of legendary gypsy guitarist DORADO SCHMITT – this year Samson comes on his own.
 
ANDREAS OBERG hails from Sweden and is a virtuoso 'rock star' of the gypsy guitar.  We are delighted to present him at the Festival for the first time on the heels of his new CD just out on Resonance Records.  LUDOVIC BEIER, a regular from Paris, is an accordion and accordina master along with being an accomplished Composer… a bright star on the horizon! 
 
Joining the band is TIMBO, French swing violinist and regular of Samson's band in Europe along with 18-year old BRONSON, rhythm player and younger brother of Samson coming to the US for the first time. KRUNO SPISIC, from Philadelphia, a swinging gypsy guitar player, with movie-star appeal, returns to Birdland to wow the audiences.  Add to all this the new American gypsy band, The HOT CLUB of DETROIT made up of 5 young musicians who have deep Jazz Gypsy roots and swing like mad! Their new CD is on Mack Avenue Records.

The veteran of the group is bassist BRIAN TORFF. He plays a mean bass and holds everything together as Musical Director.

Every year, we have a Jazz great from this side of the ocean as a Special Guest each night including JOEL FRAHM who plays the sax as hot hot as it can be.  EDMAR CASTANEDA, virtuoso on the Colombian Jazz Harp, brings an original excitement to the music.  HOWARD LEVY is a Harmonica Master (classical and Jazz) whose rip-roaring technique and personality are a great match for the gypsies. It will be a 'first' with WYCLIFFE GORDON, trombonist, playing the music of Django, with his special magic, as will DAVID LANGLOIS who plays the 'washboards,' an unusual percussion instrument that is great fun!

The Django Reinhardt NY Festival is known for 'hot swinging/romantic' music in the style of Django Reinhardt.  There will be smiles on and offstage, sheer joy, original collaborations, ...and most importantly, gypsy swing on the highest level.

Schedule: Nov. 4,5,6: Samson Schmitt, Andreas Oberg, Ludovic Beier, Kruno Spisic, Bronson, Timbo, Brian Torff + Joel Frahm (4th), Howard Levy (5th), Wycliffe Gordon (6th)
          Nov. 7,8,9: Samson, Ludovic, Kruno, Bronson, Timbo, Brian and The Hot Club of Detroit + Edmar Castaneda (7th), Joel Frahm (8th) David Langlois (9th).

Participating Sponsors:  RD WRIGHT Inc., MACK AVENUE Records, JOHN PEARSE STRINGS, MANOUCHE GUITARS, ROLAND US.
 
BIRDLAND:  315 W. 44th Street,  (good food - validated parking nearby)
Reservations 212 581 3080 or http://www.birdlandjazz.com-/  shows 8:30 & 11 pm

$45 orchestra seating - $35 general admission

Jazz Museum Events: Oct. 14-17, 2008

Jonathan Batiste- for the Grateful Web

The National Jazz Museum in Harlem begins the week on Tuesday with an analysis and listening session on Jazz in Europe and Australia, and ends with a live performance by the exciting young jazz pianist and recent Juilliard Jazz program graduate Jonathan Batiste on Friday. Between those two events, join us on Thursday night, which brings WBGO and Sirius Satellite Radio jazz host Rhonda Hamilton to the Harlem School of the Arts (new series location) for a Harlem Speaks talk. For those in the tri-state New York area, come meet the person behind the voice you've heard all these years.
 
We invite you to attend as many of our events this week as you can, to enhance your grasp of the international influence of this music, join in conversation with a noted jazz host on the current scene, and experience a live trio of young musicians pointing the way toward its future.
                    
Tuesday, October 14, 2008

Jazz for Curious Listeners
Jazz Around the World: Europe and Australia
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | register online
Instructor: Loren Schoenberg
 
Jazz has been accorded a level of respect and admiration in Europe since the 1930s rivaling the reception to jazz found anywhere, including the U.S. That's why some black American jazz musicians became expatriates to Europe: they so appreciated the social acceptance of the music there as well as being treated with a human dignity all-too-rare because of racism at home. Saxophonists Don Byas, Dexter Gordon and Johnny Griffin are just three examples of musicians who found life in the Old World more amenable than in the New World.
 
What is it about the European understanding of the role of art in culture and society that led to an even higher appreciation of jazz there than in the native land of the music's origins? What European and Australian musicians have made a mark on jazz in the past? Of course, the beloved British jazz pianist George Shearing readily comes to mind, but who are the others? Even now there are musicians making a mark, such as Perth, Australian saxophonist Troy Roberts, a semi-finalist in the Thelonious Monk International Jazz Saxophone Competition.
 
Then there are those attempts to combine elements from the European concert tradition and American jazz, some more successful than others. These and related topics are fodder for exploration, especially if you bring some thoughts, questions and insights of your own.
 
This is Jazz for Curious Listeners, so we welcome your input. See you there.

Thursday, October 16, 2008

HARLEM SPEAKS
6:30pm
Rhonda Hamilton, jazz broadcaster, WBGO
Location:
Harlem School of the Arts
(645 St. Nicholas Avenue, off 141st street)
FREE | Reservations: 212-348-8300
 
Please note our new location this month.

Rhonda Hamilton, a native New Yorker, is the host and producer of a popular jazz program which airs weekdays, 10AM - 2PM, on WBGO/Jazz 88FM in Newark, NJ.
 
In 1976, Ms. Hamilton graduated from Boston University's School of Public Communication, receiving a B.S. in Broadcasting and Film. She also studied acting at the Actor's Studio in Boston. She began her career in radio in 1975 as a jazz announcer/producer at WBUR-FM in Boston. She later became the music director for WBUR. At WBZ-TV in Boston, she worked as a music reviewer and commentator on the public affairs program, "Mzizi Roots."

Returning to the New York/New Jersey metropolitan area in March 1979, Ms. Hamilton came to WBGO at the station's inception and has played a key role in making Jazz 88 one of the finest and most listened to jazz stations in the world. In 1979 and 1980, she won the New York Jazz Award for Best Jazz DJ "in appreciation of a major contribution to the cultural life of our region."
 
In 1995 she was recognized "for her achievements in the world of jazz" as the recipient of The Ladies in Jazz Award from Mayor Giuliani of New York and the Harlem Chamber of Commerce.

Ms. Hamiton's work has taken her to three continents. In 1984 she was invited to attend the first Senegalese Festival of Jazz and African Music. While in Dakar, Senegal, Ms. Hamilton was interviewed as a featured guest on a national TV news program. In 1985 she was invited to Europe by the Danish Tourist Board to document the Scandinavian jazz scene. After traveling to Brazil, Ms. Hamilton exposed the American public to various aspects of Brazilian culture - music, dance, film, food, religion, etc. - when she hosted a series of 36 programs called "Brazil/New York" which aired on WNYC-TV in 1985 and 1986.

In addition to her work at WBGO, Ms. Hamilton also does commercial and industrial voice-overs and is often called upon to host/narrate film, video and radio productions for such organizations as WNET-TV PBS/Channel 13 in New York, National Public Radio, Columbia Records and Japan Television NHK. She was the host of the nationally syndicated radio series "Big Apple Jazz", "American Women in Jazz" and "The Voices of Jazz," which she also co-produced.

Ms. Hamilton frequently hosts special music and cultural events in such historic places as the Apollo Theater, Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, the Beacon Theater and the Brooklyn Academy of Music. In 1993 she produced and moderated a Symposium on Women in Jazz for the Newark Jazz Festival and in 1996 she was a guest speaker on "Jazz and The Media" at the first annual Mary Lou Williams Women's Jazz Festival at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C.

Friday, October 17, 2008

HARLEM IN THE HIMALAYAS
7:00pm
Jonathan Batiste Trio
Location:
Rubin Museum of Art
(150 West 17th Street)
$18 in advance | $20 at door |
Box Office: 212.620.5000 ext. 344
 
Jonathan Batiste, piano
Phil Kuehn, bass
Louis Hayes, drums

Jonathan Batiste was born in New Orleans, Louisiana in 1986. He was first introduced to music through his family's band, the Batiste Brothers Band, in which he played percussion at the age of 8, switching to the piano at age 11.  

By the age of 16 years old, Jonathan could be seen performing with some of New Orleans' most outstanding and respected musicians, including the New Orleans Jazz Orchestra, Wynton Marsalis, Irvin Mayfield, Nicholas Payton, Alvin Batiste, Cyril Neville, Donald Harrison, Troy "Trombone Shorty" Andrews at venues such as New Orleans' Snug Harbor, Tipitinas, Funky Butt as well as the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival where he debuted his band in 2005. By the age of 17, he released his first CD as a leader entitled "Times in New Orleans." Also that year, Jonathan was selected through a nationwide search to be a member of the 2004 Gibson/Baldwin Grammy High School Jazz Ensembles in which he performed, in trio format, at the Grammy week of events as well as the Grammy pre-telecast and post celebration in Los Angeles.

In 2004, Jonathan graduated from St. Augustine High School and the New Orleans Center for Creative Arts (NOCCA) under the tutelage of Alvin Batiste, Michael Pellera, and others. NOCCA is a high-level fine arts conservatory that has produced alumni such as Wynton Marsalis, Branford Marsalis, Harry Connick Jr., Terrence Blanchard and many more. Jonathan auditioned at The Juilliard School for the 2004-2005 school year and was accepted. He graduated from Juilliard in 2008. Since his arrival to New York he has been performing regularly around the city with his trio. His most recent release entitled "Live In New York: At The Rubin Museum Of Art" features the talents of his trio (Phillip Kuehn and Joe Saylor), as well as his skills as a pianist and composer in a live acoustic setting.

He recently was awarded the "Movado Future Legend" award in jazz and has been playing around the world with his trio from Portugal to New York. He joined his fellow Juilliard piano colleague Aaron Diehl and one of his key influences, Marcus Roberts, on stage at Jazz at Lincoln Center's Allen Room for a solo piano recital titled, "Ragtime, Stride and Stomp."

Join us as Jonathan returns to the Rubin for what promises to be another evening of memorable music.

National Jazz Museum in Harlem October Schedule

Jonathan Batiste- for the Grateful Web

The National Jazz Museum in Harlem covers the gamut in October 2008, with live performances for the Harlem in the Himalayas series featuring elder masters and young artists who defy the constraints of genre through style as well as discussions with three notable media standard-bearers: WBGO's velvet-voice Rhonda Hamilton, and two living legends of journalism, Evelyn Cunningham and Nat Hentoff. (NOTE: the Harlem Speaks interview series will return this month to the Harlem School of the Arts).         
 
Our adult ed class, Jazz for Curious Listeners, explores the impact of jazz around the world as well as the influence of Asia, Europe, Australia, Africa, and the Americas on the preeminent United States musical idiom, jazz. And don't miss a special National Endowment of the Arts discussion on the future of jazz with a panel that includes executive director of The National Jazz Museum in Harlem, Loren Schoenberg. 
 
And to wrap up September, our last Classic Album analysis (of Andrew Hill's "Point of Departure") will be held on September 30th at the Visitor's Center. 
 
As you'll see below, our claim above of covering "the gamut" is far from a public relations ploy. Whatever your taste or level of interest in jazz, you'll find programs to satisfy your longing for artistic nourishment.
 
September 30, 2008
Jazz for Curious Listeners
What Makes it Tick? Five Classic Albums
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | register online 

Andrew Hill: Point of Departure

Alfred Lion, founder of Blue Note Records, considered Andrew Hill his last major discovery, for Hill's rich, rhythmic piano and utterly unique compositions stand alone. "Point Of Departure" is Hill's masterpiece, with rich three-horn arrangements for Kenny Dorham, Eric Dolphy and Joe Henderson. Richard Davis and Tony Williams complete this high level ensemble of musicians with a wide range of approaches, but who, on this classic date, created a unified aesthetic whole.
October 3, 2008

Harlem in the Himalayas
Reggie Workman, Oliver Lake & Andrew Cyrille
7:00pm
Location: Rubin Museum of Art
(150 West 17th Street)
$18 in advance | $20 at door | 
Box Office: 212.620.5000 ext. 344

Oliver Lake, saxophone
Reggie Workman, bass
Andrew Cyrille, drums
 
Trio 3 celebrates 20 years of performances in 2008. Jazz critic Gary Giddins, in his liner notes for one of the group's recordings, wrote that their ". . . cumulative experience involves the assimilation of every kind of jazz, from pre-bop mainstream to the furthest reaches of the avant-garde to sundry precincts on the world music front." 

Reggie Workman has long been one of the most technically gifted of all bassists, a brilliant player whose versatile style fits into both hard bop and very avant-garde settings. After working regularly with Gigi Gryce (1958), Red Garland, and Roy Haynes, he was a member of the John Coltrane Quartet for much of 1961, participating in several important recordings and on television. Workman then became a member of Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers (1962-1964) and was in the groups of Yusef Lateef (1964-65), Herbie Mann, and Thelonious Monk (1967). He recorded frequently in the 1960s (including many Blue Note dates and Archie Shepp's classic "Four for Trane").

Since that time, Workman has been both an educator and a working musician, and has played with numerous legendary jazz musicians including Max Roach, Art Farmer, Mal Waldron, David Murray, Sam Rivers, and Andrew Hill. In the 1980s, Workman began leading his own group, the Reggie Workman Ensemble. He also began a collaboration with pianist Marilyn Crispell that lasted into the next decade. During the '90s, Workman was not only active with his own ensemble, but also in Trio Three (with Andrew Cyrille and Oliver Lake), and Reggie Workman's Grooveship and Extravaganza.

In recognition of Workman's international performances and recordings spanning over 40 years, he was named a Living Legend by the African-American Historical and Cultural Museum in his hometown of Philadelphia; he is also a recipient of the Eubie Blake Award, and serves as an Associate Professor at New York's famed The New School (Jazz and Contemporary Music Department) where, in 2007, he celebrated his twentieth-year and was awarded the Distinguished Teaching Award.
 
Andrew Cyrille enrolled in Juilliard School of Music in 1958. In the late '50s and early '60s, he worked with such mainstream jazzers as Mary Lou Williams, Roland Hanna, Roland Kirk, Coleman Hawkins, and Junior Mance. He recorded with Hawkins, as well as tenor saxophonist Bill Barron, for the Savoy label. Then Cyrille succeeded Sunny Murray as Cecil Taylor's drummer in 1964. He stayed with the pianist until 1975, during which time he played on many of Taylor's classic albums. During that period he played with many other top players, including Marion Brown, Grachan Moncur III and Jimmy Giuffre. He also served for a time as artist in residence at Antioch College and recorded a solo percussion album, 1969's "What About?". Cyrille, Rashied Ali, and Milford Graves collaborated on a series of mid-'70s concerts entitled "Dialogue of the Drums." Cyrille is perhaps the preeminent free-jazz percussionist of the 1980s and '90s. 

Oliver Lake is an explosively unpredictable soloist, somewhat akin to Eric Dolphy in the ultra-nimble manner in which he traverses the full range of his main horn, the alto. Lake's astringent saxophone sound is his trademark - piercing, bluesy, and biting in the manner of a Maceo Parker, it was a perfect lead voice for the World Saxophone Quartet, the band with which Lake has made his most enduring mark on jazz.

From the late '60s to the early '70s he taught school, played in various contexts around St. Louis, and led—along with Julius Hemphill and Charles "Bobo" Shaw, among others—a musician's collective, the Black Artist's Group (BAG). In 1976, with Hemphill, Hamiet Bluiett, and David Murray, he founded the World Saxophone Quartet (WSQ). Over the next two decades, that band reached a level of popularity perhaps unprecedented by a free jazz ensemble. Its late-'80s albums of Ellington works and R&B tunes attracted an audience that otherwise might never have found its way to such an esoteric style. 

Lake continued working as a leader apart from the WSQ, he made excellent small-group albums in the '70s and '80s for Arista/Freedom and Black Saint. In the '80s, Lake led a reggae-oriented band, Jump Up, that had a degree of pop success. In the '90s, Lake continued to stretch creatively; a duo album with classically trained pianist Donal Fox set him free to explore the more fanciful side of his musical personality.

October 7, 2008

Jazz for Curious Listeners
Jazz Around the World: Asia
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | register online

Go to almost any of the major jazz clubs in New York, and look at the audience. Very likely you will see persons from various Asian countries in rapt attention. What is the draw for Asians to jazz? Explore the answers with Loren Schoenberg.

October 14, 2008

Jazz for Curious Listeners
Jazz Around the World: Europe and Australia
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | register online

Jazz has been accorded a level of respect and admiration in Europe since the 1930s rivaling the reception to jazz found anywhere, including the U.S. Many black American jazz musicians so appreciated the social acceptance of the music in Europe that they became expatriates. Come discover the cultural and social ties between American jazz and Europe, and Australia too.

October 16, 2008

Harlem Speaks
Rhonda Hamilton, Jazz Broadcaster
6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: Harlem School of the Arts
(645 St. Nicholas Avenue, off 141st street)
FREE | Reservations: 212-348-8300

Please note our new location this month.
Rhonda Hamilton, a native New Yorker, is the host and producer of a popular jazz program which airs weekdays, 10AM - 2PM, on WBGO/Jazz 88FM in Newark, NJ. 

In 1976, Ms. Hamilton graduated from Boston University's School of Public Communication, receiving a B.S. in Broadcasting and Film. She also studied acting at the Actor's Studio in Boston. She began her career in radio in 1975 as a jazz announcer/producer at WBUR-FM in Boston. She later became the music director for WBUR. At WBZ-TV in Boston, she worked as a music reviewer and commentator on the public affairs program, "Mzizi Roots." 

Returning to the New York/New Jersey metropolitan area in March 1979, Ms. Hamilton came to WBGO at the station's inception and has played a key role in making Jazz 88 one of the finest and most listened to jazz stations in the world. In 1979 and 1980, she won the New York Jazz Award for Best Jazz DJ "in appreciation of a major contribution to the cultural life of our region." 

In 1995 she was recognized "for her achievements in the world of jazz" as the recipient of The Ladies in Jazz Award from Mayor Giuliani of New York and the Harlem Chamber of Commerce. 

Ms. Hamiton's work has taken her to three continents. In 1984 she was invited to attend the first Senegalese Festival of Jazz and African Music. While in Dakar, Senegal, Ms. Hamilton was interviewed as a featured guest on a national TV news program. In 1985 she was invited to Europe by the Danish Tourist Board to document the Scandinavian jazz scene. After traveling to Brazil, Ms. Hamilton exposed the American public to various aspects of Brazilian culture - music, dance, film, food, religion, etc. - when she hosted a series of 36 programs called "Brazil/New York" which aired on WNYC-TV in 1985 and 1986. 

In addition to her work at WBGO, Ms. Hamilton also does commercial and industrial voice-overs and is often called upon to host/narrate film, video and radio productions for such organizations as WNET-TV PBS/Channel 13 in New York, National Public Radio, Columbia Records and Japan Television NHK. She was the host of the nationally syndicated radio series "Big Apple Jazz", "American Women in Jazz" and "The Voices of Jazz," which she also co-produced. 

Ms. Hamilton frequently hosts special music and cultural events in such historic places as the Apollo Theater, Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, the Beacon Theater and the Brooklyn Academy of Music. In 1993 she produced and moderated a Symposium on Women in Jazz for the Newark Jazz Festival and in 1996 she was a guest speaker on "Jazz and The Media" at the first annual Mary Lou Williams Women's Jazz Festival at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. 

October 17, 2008

Special Event
NEA Jazz Symposium: The Future of Jazz
9:00 – 11:30am
Location: Langston Hughes Auditorium
(Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, 515 Malcolm X Boulevard)
FREE | r.s.v.p. by October 10

Dana Gioia, Chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, invites you to participate in a lively conversation on the future of jazz, jazz education, and jazz audiences.

Panelists will include: 
Dr. David Baker, NEA Jazz Master
Dr. Billy Taylor, NEA Jazz Master 
Adrian Ellis, Executive Director, Jazz at Lincoln Center
Nicole Mitchell, flutist and composer
Loren Schoenberg, Executive Director, The National Jazz Museum in Harlem
Helen Sung, pianist and composer

Moderated by A.B. Spellman, author, poet, and critic

This symposium launches the 2009 NEA Jazz Masters celebration, taking place in partnership with Jazz at Lincoln Center.

October 17, 2008

Harlem in the Himalayas
The Jonathan Batiste Trio
7:00pm
Location: Rubin Museum of Art
(150 West 17th Street)
$18 in advance | $20 at door | 
Box Office: 212.620.5000 ext. 344

Jonathan Batiste was born in New Orleans, Louisiana in 1986. He was first introduced to music through his family's band, the Batiste Brothers Band, in which he played percussion at the age of 8, switching to the piano at age 11.  

By the age of 16 years old, Jonathan could be seen performing with some of New Orleans' most outstanding and respected musicians, including the New Orleans Jazz Orchestra, Wynton Marsalis, Irvin Mayfield, Nicholas Payton, Alvin Batiste, Cyril Neville, Donald Harrison, Troy "Trombone Shorty" Andrews at venues such as New Orleans' Snug Harbor, Tipitinas, Funky Butt as well as the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival where he debuted his band in 2005. By the age of 17, he released his first CD as a leader entitled "Times in New Orleans." Also that year, Jonathan was selected through a nationwide search to be a member of the 2004 Gibson/Baldwin Grammy High School Jazz Ensembles in which he performed, in trio format, at the Grammy week of events as well as the Grammy pre-telecast and post celebration in Los Angeles. 

In 2004, Jonathan graduated from St. Augustine High School and the New Orleans Center for Creative Arts (NOCCA) under the tutelage of Alvin Batiste, Michael Pellera, and others. NOCCA is a high-level fine arts conservatory that has produced alumni such as Wynton Marsalis, Branford Marsalis, Harry Connick Jr., Terrence Blanchard and many more. Jonathan auditioned at The Juilliard School for the 2004-2005 school year and was accepted. He graduated from Juilliard in 2008. Since his arrival to New York he has been performing regularly around the city with his trio. His most recent release entitled "Live In New York: At The Rubin Museum Of Art" features the talents of his trio (Phillip Kuehn and Joe Saylor), as well as his skills as a pianist and composer in a live acoustic setting.

He recently was awarded the "Movado Future Legend" award in jazz and has been playing around the world with his trio from Portugal to New York. He joined his fellow Juilliard piano colleague Aaron Diehl and one of his key influences, Marcus Roberts, on stage at Jazz at Lincoln Center's Allen Room for a solo piano recital titled, "Ragtime, Stride and Stomp."

October 21, 2008

Jazz for Curious Listeners
Jazz Around the World: Africa
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | register online

Jazz was founded by descendants from the continent of Africa, who retained certain features that found its way into jazz, such as a dance-beat orientation to movement. But jazz has also influenced the music of Africa, and some noted African pop stars such as Fela Kuti, founder of the Afrobeat style. Cross-cultural influence is the theme tonight, as we continue to explore Jazz Around the World.

October 27, 2008

Jazz for Curious Readers
Nat Hentoff
6:30 – 8:00pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | Reservations: 212-348-8300 or register online

Nat Hentoff was born in Boston in 1925. He received his B.A. with the highest honors from Northeastern University and did graduate work at Harvard. He was a Fulbright fellow at the Sorbonne in Paris in 1950. From 1953 through 1957 he was associate editor of Down Beat magazine. He was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in education and an American Bar Association Silver Gavel Award in 1980 for his coverage of the law and criminal justice in his columns. In 1985 he was awarded an honorary Doctorate of Laws by Northeastern University. 

He has published many books on jazz, biographies and novels, including a number of books for children. Among his works: "Does Anybody Give A Damn?: Nat Hentoff on Education," "Our Children Are Dying," "A Doctor Among Addicts," "Peace Agitator: The Story of A. J Muste," "The New Equality," "The First Freedom: The Tumultuous History of Free Speech in America," "The Day They Came to Arrest the Book," "The Man from Internal Affairs," "Boston Boy," "John Cardinal O'Connor: At The Storm Center of a Changing American Catholic Church," "Free Speech for Me and Not for Thee: How the American Left and Right Relentlessly Censor Each Other,"  "Listen to the Stories: Nat Hentoff on Jazz and Country Music," and the celebrated young people's book on race and jazz, "Jazz Country." 

In addition to his weekly Village Voice column, Hentoff writes on music for the Wall Street Journal. Among other publications in which his work has appeared are the New York Times, the New Republic, Commonweal, the Atlantic and the New Yorker, where he was a staff writer for more than 25 years. 

Hentoff's views on journalistic responsibility and the rights of Americans to write, think and speak freely are expressed in his weekly column, and he has come to be acknowledged as a foremost authority in the area of First Amendment defense. He is also an expert on the Bill of Rights, the Supreme Court, student rights and education. 

October 28, 2008

Jazz for Curious Listeners
Jazz Around the World: The Americas
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | register online

Jazz is a North American export with strong South American "tinges," to paraphrase Jelly Roll Morton. From Brazil to Argentina, Cuba to Puerto Rico, are musicians who have incorporated jazz into their native sounds and grooves. And the presence of musicians from the Caribbean is one of the best kept secrets in jazz. Uncover the truth tonight.

October 30, 2008

Harlem Speaks
Evelyn Cunningham, Journalist
6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: Harlem School of the Arts
(645 St. Nicholas Avenue, off 141st street)
FREE | Reservations: 212-348-8300

Reporter, editor, columnist, radio host, special assistant to governors, member of various  task forces, Evelyn Cunningham has been involved in much of the reporting and shaping of American civil rights. She covered the Civil Rights Movement as a reporter for one of the foremost African American newspapers the Pittsburgh Courier. Cunningham has also served underrepresented Americans through seeking to improve opportunities and increase rights for African Americans, women and poor citizens, through public and private positions within the government and various organizations.

Evelyn Elizabeth Long was born on January 25, 1916, in Elizabeth City, North Carolina in Pasquotank County. Her mother, Mary Whitehurst Long, a dressmaker, and father, Clyde Long, a cabdriver, were very involved in their children's (Cunningham has a brother, Clyde Whitehurst) education. When her parents heard their daughter say she wanted to pick cotton when she grew up, they moved the family from North Carolina to Harlem, New York, where African Americans were progressive. Upon reaching New York, Cunningham did well in school and graduated from Hunter College High School in 1934. She later went to Long Island University where she graduated with a BA in the social sciences in 1943.

In 1940, Cunningham began to work for the Pittsburgh Courier by clipping stories from the New York Times that were relevant to blacks and rewriting these stories for the Courier. She was a reporter, columnist, editor and city editor with the Pittsburgh Courier from 1940-1962. Cunningham covered lynchings, major events, protests, and key figures such as Martin Luther King, Malcolm X during this era. She was known for getting people to open up and tell her things, stories they might not tell others.

In 1961, interested in being involved in direct action while reporting, Cunningham traveled with Percy Sutton and other NAACP members to the Double T Diner in Rosedale, MD to stage a sit-in protesting segregation practices in restaurants. The group was arrested, found guilty of trespassing and fined $101.

In this same year, Cunningham began hosting "At Home With Evelyn Cunningham," a half hour radio show on WLIB in New York. During the show's five years and popularity, Cunningham interviewed significant figures within the African American community in New York. 

Evelyn Cunningham's post-journalistic career developed when she became special assistant to Jackie Robinson, former baseball player and political consultant to Governor Rockefeller. In this position and others that followed, she continued her service to the American public. Cunningham was the special assistant to New York Governors Nelson A. Rockefeller and Malcolm Wilson, and director of the Women's Unit in the office of the Governor between 1969-1974. In 1969, Cunningham accompanied Rockefeller to several Caribbean countries in order to research and write a report on racial problems and women's problems in that region. Under President Richard Nixon, Cunningham was appointed to the Task Force on Women's Rights and Responsibilities (1969). From 1975-1976, she also served as special assistant to U.S. President Gerald Ford, office of Vice President Rockefeller. In 1970, Cunningham helped to found the New York Coalition of One Hundred Black Women, a nonprofit organization which seeks to improve the lives of black women and their families through implementing initiatives and services to address important social, economic, political, cultural issues. She has belonged to many feminist organizations throughout the years and has had a special interest in working within the government and in nonprofits on addressing major issues that concern women.

Evelyn Cunningham was one of five former reporters of the Pittsburgh Courier to receive the prestigious George Polk Award in 1998 on behalf of the newspaper. It was the first time the award, usually reserved for an individual, had been given to a newspaper. She also won the Women of the Century Award from the Century Club, (NYC) in 1998. A nonagenarian, Cunningham serves on different boards and on keeping young people involved in the arts.

New Jersey Blues & Jazz Festival at the Backstage Jazz Club

Rod Piazza - photo by Franky Bruneel- for the Grateful Web

The State Theatre presents the New Jersey Blues & Jazz Festival at the Backstage Jazz Club, September 25-27. It's an all-star musical lineup in an intimate setting for serious and casual jazz and blues fans alike. Featured performances during the festival include Legend of Blues: Pinetop Perkins featuring Hubert Sumlin and Willie "Big Eyes" Smith (9/25/08 at 8pm & 10:30pm); Ron Carter Quartet and vocalist Lisa Sokolov (9/26/08 at 8pm & 10:30pm); and Rod Piazza & The Mighty Flyers and John Hammond (9/27/08 at 8pm & 10:30pm).

All three sets take place in the exclusive 238-seat club-style venue on stage. Tickets range from $30-45 and are on sale now. The festival has been made possible by the generous support of The Karma Foundation and New Millennium Bank.

"We received so much great feedback from last year's Backstage Jazz Festival, we just had to bring it back… this time adding a little blues to the lineup," commented State Theatre President & CEO Wes Brustad.

The schedule for New Jersey Blues & Jazz Festival at the Backstage Jazz Club is as follows:

Set #1 "Legend of Blues"
Thu, September 25, 2008 at 8pm & 10:30pm at the Backstage Jazz Club
Pinetop Perkins featuring Hubert Sumlin and Willie "Big Eyes" Smith
The show boasts legendary pianist and Grammy® Award nominee Pinetop Perkins, who is best known for his piano playing in the Muddy Waters Band for 12 years; guitarist Hubert Sumlin, who has played with such names as Chuck Berry, Willie Dixon, and The Rolling Stones; and seven-time W.C. Handy Award winner/multiple Grammy® Award nominee harmonica player, Willie "Big Eyes" Smith. Smith played with Muddy Waters for many years, appearing on all of Muddy's Grammy®-winning albums.
Tickets: $45 Table Seat, $30 Chairs.

Set #2 "Ron Carter Quartet"
Fri, September 26 at 8pm & 10:30pm at the Backstage Jazz Club
Ron Carter Quartet with vocalist Lisa Sokolov
Two-time Grammy Award-winner Ron Carter is among the most original, prolific, and influential bassists in jazz. With more than 2,000 albums to his credit, he has recorded with many of music's greats including: Tommy Flanagan, Gil Evans, Lena Horne, and B.B. King. From 1963 to 1968, he was a member of the acclaimed Miles Davis Quintet. He was Artistic Director of the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz Studies while it was located in Boston and, after 18 years on the faculty of the Music Department of The City College of New York, he is now Distinguished Professor Emeritus.

Lisa Sokolov is a frontline New York jazz vocalist, improviser, and composer. Accompanying Lisa Sokolov will be Jazz bassist Cameron Brown. Brown anchored some of the most important groups of the '70s, '80s and '90s. The Don Pullen/George Adams Quartet, featuring Dannie Richmond, developed into a rewarding partnership which lasted nearly 10 years.
Tickets: $45 Table Seat, $30 Chairs.

Set #3 "Rod Piazza and Friends"
Sat, September 27 at 8pm & 10:30pm at the Backstage Jazz Club
Rod Piazza & The Mighty Flyers and John Hammond
From his first recordings as a leader in 1967 fronting The Dirty Blues Band, through his multiple W.C. Handy award-winning releases with his current band The Mighty Flyers, to his countless appearances both live and on record with the most revered names in the blues, Rod Piazza has established himself as one of the most influential living blues harp players.  

With a career that now spans in excess of three decades, John Hammond is one of handful of White blues musicians who was on the scene at the beginning of the first blues renaissance of the mid-'60s. He does justice to classic blues by combining powerful guitar and harmonica playing with expressive vocals and a dignified stage presence.
Tickets: $45 Table Seat, $30 Chairs.

On Stage Venue— Backstage Jazz Club
This 238-seat on stage venue is custom designed to give patrons an exclusive club-style experience just inches away from the artists. The Backstage Jazz Club provides a unique environment for patrons to relax on stage, face the beautiful interior of the magnificently renovated 1921 hall, and experience music from living jazz and blues greats up close and personal. The venue's entrance and all accommodations are backstage. There will be assigned table seating and general admission non-table seating, as well as light fare, and a fully-stocked bar.

JAZZ FOR OBAMA

Vote for Obama!- for the Grateful Web

ITS EASY: To purchase tickets simply click HERE.  You will be directed to the campaign contribution page.  Simply enter all required information and then click on the red PROCESS CONTRIBUTION button at the bottom.  In order to purchase multiple tickets simultaneously, just click on 'other' and enter the total dollar amount.  Then include a note stating the number/kind of tickets desired in the designated 'send a note...' box below, just above the red button.  Your name will be held at the door (tickets will not be mailed), but you will receive an email confirmation of your purchase/contribution within 24 hrs.  All proceeds benefit the Obama for America Presidential campaign.

YOU WANT MORE: If you wish to contribute a higher amount than the sum total of your ticket price, the Obama campaign will be very grateful!  Simply donate as much as you can, and then include a note stating the number of tickets desired in the designated 'send a note...' box on the contribution page just above the red button, or email us at the address below with your ticket needs.  

TELL YOUR FRIENDS: After your contribution/ticket purchase is processed, you will be asked by the campaign website to email a pre-set invitation to your contacts asking them to contribute to the Obama campaign as well.  This is a general invitation to support Barack, but you may easily transform it into a concert invitation as well!  If you would like to use this opportunity to invite anyone to the Jazz for Obama concert in particular (and we hope you will), just be sure to include a note about the concert in your email, and most importantly include our weblink jazzforobama.com so that your friends can purchase tickets just as you did!

WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 1st
featuring

BILAL/ROBERT GLASPER
DEE DEE BRIDGEWATER
KURT ELLING
ROBERTA GAMBARINI
ROY HARGROVE
STEFON HARRIS
ROY HAYNES
CHARLIE HUNTER/DOUG WAMBLE DUO
HANK JONES
STANLEY JORDAN
JOE LOVANO
CHRISTIAN MCBRIDE
BRAD MEHLDAU
DIANNE REEVES
   ...and special guests

OCTOBER 1 - 7:30pm
The 92nd Street Y Kaufmann Concert Hall
 Lexington Avenue at 92nd Street
(Doors open 6:30 pm)

ALL PROCEEDS BENEFIT THE OBAMA FOR AMERICA PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN TICKETS AND ALL INFORMATION AVAILABLE ONLY AT: http://www.jazzforobama.com/

Jazz Museum Events: Sept. 23-26, 2008

Chico Hamilton- for the Grateful Web

The season change, summer becoming fall, doesn't apply to the programming of the National Jazz Museum in Harlem since you can depend on something hot and fresh each week.
 
Take our Tuesday Jazz for Curious Listeners class for instance. Wynton Marsalis's Blue Interlude recording was the first long composition by the most influential jazz musician of his generation. Come discover what makes Marsalis a special composer of the jazz idiom and how this recording foreshadowed his future works.
 
Two elder statesman of the music will parlay a discussion on Thursday for Harlem Speaks: Dr. Billy Taylor, of whom the museum just spent a month of classes, will come back to the Visitor's Center to interview Chico Hamilton, still going strong after 60 years at the trap drums.
 
Then for a unique twist on jazz music, see David Ornette Cherry's Ensemble for Improvisers at the Rubin Museum of Art on Friday for Harlem in the Himalayas. Come be a part of history in the making.

Tuesday, September 23, 2008
Jazz for Curious Listeners
What Makes it Tick? Five Classic Albums
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | Reservations: 212-348-8300 or register online

Wynton Marsalis: Blue Interlude
"Blue Interlude" is an ambitious work centered on two mythic lovers, and it beautifully executes Wynton Marsalis' stated fundamentals of jazz: a communal conception of improvising, vocal effects on instruments, swinging rhythms, blues, and a sense of mystery and even melancholy. There are echoes of Duke Ellington and Charles Mingus, yet on this, his first extended composition on record, he establishes his own compositional stamp.

If you've listened to this recording before, or even if you haven't at all, rest assured that you'll hear Marsalis' "mastery of making four horns sound as full and as varied in timbre as a big band," says Loren Schoenberg in The NPR Curious Listener's Guide to Jazz.

Thursday, September 25, 2008
Harlem Speaks
Chico Hamilton, Drummer; Interviewer: Dr. Billy Taylor
6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMIH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | Reservations: 212-348-8300

Legendary jazz drummer and bandleader Chico Hamilton, born September 21st, 1921 in Los Angeles, had a fast track musical education in a band with his schoolmates Charles Mingus, Illinois Jacquet, Ernie Royal, Dexter Gordon, Buddy Collette and Jack Kelso. Engagements with Lionel Hampton, Slim & Slam, T-Bone Walker, Lester Young, Count Basie, Duke Ellington, Charlie Barnett, Billy Eckstine, Nat King Cole, Sammy Davis Jr., Billie Holiday, Gerry Mulligan and six years with Lena Horne established this young West Coast prodigy as a jazz drummer on the rise, before striking out on his own as a bandleader in 1955.

Chico's impact upon jazz includes the introduction of two unique and distinct sounds: first in 1955 with his Original Quintet which combined the sounds of his drums, the bass of Carson Smith, the guitar of Jim Hall, the cello of Fred Katz, and the flute of Buddy Collette; and the second in 1962 with his own drums, the bass of Albert Stinson, the guitar of Gabor Szabo, the tenor sax of Charles Lloyd, and the trombone of George Bohanon.

In 1997, Chico received the New School University Jazz & Contemporary Music Programs Beacons in Jazz Award in recognition for his "significant contribution to the evolution of Jazz". In 2002, Chico was awarded the WLIU-FM Radio Lifetime Achievement Award. At the IAJE in NYC January 2004, Hamilton was awarded a NEA Jazz Master Fellowship, presented to him by Roy Haynes. In December 2006, Congress confirmed the President's nomination of Chico to the Presidents Council on the Arts. And in 2007, Chico received a Living Legacy Jazz Award as part of The Kennedy Centers Jazz in Our Time Festival, as well as receiving a Doctor of Fine Arts from The New School.

Dynamic as ever at the age of 86, Chico Hamilton has a resume that includes scores for film, original compositions, commercial jingles, 50 + albums as a leader, and countless international tours.

Friday, September 26, 2008
Harlem in the Himalayas
David Ornette Cherry with The Ensemble for Improvisors
7:00pm
Location: Rubin Museum of Art
(150 West 17th Street)
$18 in advance | $20 at door |
Box Office: 212.620.5000 ext. 344

David Ornette Cherry grew up in Watts, California. This Watts young man, son of Don Cherry, later won the 2003 ASCAP- Chamber Music America Award for adventurous Programming of Contemporary Music. He is inspired by themes of silence and nature versus technology.

The pulses and melodies that arise from his jazz, classical, African, world music background, and from playing with some of the great jazz artists of our times, speak about our human experiences through the language of sound. He listens with an open heart and fresh mind to his collaborators and the world around him in a way that makes his compositions not only music, but a way of life a positive form of energy, and a way to connect. His current group is titled Ensemble for Improvisors, the latest iteration of which you can hear tonight.

David Ornette Cherry studied music composition at Bishop College in Dallas and began concentrating on "world music" at California Institute of the Arts. He spent challenging summers attending the Creative Music Studio at Woodstock, New York. These summer experiences gave him the space to compose and create music with Trilok Gurtu, Olatunji, Jai Deva, and Foday Musa Suso and to explore the relationship of jazz and music from other cultures. While jazz remains both the root and sustenance of his sound, he often incorporates the sounds of the world in what he calls "multi-kulti" music. Acoustic piano, electronic keyboards, melodica, wood flute and douss'n gouni are his instruments.

He sees himself crossing borders drawing from the past - building a passageway to jazz of the future. David states, "The music never stopped. Jazz is dynamic. It is a continuum that expands and takes from the players and composers so they can add their little something to the art. It's not about JUST referencing the past. It's about keeping the momentum going like a ball that keeps rolling along."

David Ornette Cherry's future plans include: "Creating a musical intensity which invigorates and sets trends in jazz of the future, passing the torch to take the music beyond...to become another color in the ever-expanding sound spectrum."