kirk

INXS plays the hits & more at the Ogden Theatre

As I eagerly anticipated INXS’ show at Denver’s Ogden Theatre, I will admit that I didn’t know if I was going to witness an act that was well past its prime and just going through the motions.

Mocean Worker | 'Candygram For Mowo!'

It’s been four years since we last heard from our favorite fast-talking, electro-funk, party-jams beat-maker Adam Dorn a.k.a. Mocean Worker. Since then tough economics have turned tougher, smug indie bands have become smugger and raving mad religious fanatics have grown, well, raving madder. What the world could use in these troubling times is some good ol' fashioned, happy days are here again, get up on the good foot grooves. Mocean Worker--who has built a reputation for exactly that over a ten-year plus career as a recording artist, songwriter, remixer, DJ, bassist and more--returns made to order with his sixth studio album, Candygram For Mowo!

From the opening salvo of the record’s first track "Shooby Shooby Do Yah!" in which 1930s big band horns are met by the syncopated rattle of a tambourine, it's apparent that the Mocean Worker feel-good brand is intact.  Joined by a divers cast of special guests, including Lyrics Born, Mindy Abair, Bill Frisell, Charlie Hunter, John Ellis, Hal Willner and Rahsaan Roland Kirk, Mowo! brings the funk in all manner of delectable shapes and sizes. Whether crossing swing era rave-ups with ‘70s rare groove ("Do Like Ya Like"), Les McCann meets Marvin Gaye-flavored house party, soul jazz ("Sistas & Bruthas"), North Cali hip-hop with ‘50s hard bop ("My Own Little World") or injecting deep house with Nuyorican rhythms ("Out There In The Random"), the beats are infectious, the hooks irresistible and the attitude always cheeky.

In Mocean Worker's own words, "These ain't good times, so why not have something that makes us feel good?"

Candygram For Mowo! is indeed what our collective sweet tooth craves.

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Candygram For Mowo! track listing:

1. Shooby Shooby Do Yah! (featuring Steven Bernstein)
2. Swagger
3. My Own Little World (featuring Lyrics Born & Mindi Abair)
4. Hoot & Hollah
5. Sistas & Bruthas (featuring Mindi Abair)
6. It Still Don’t Mean A Thing (featuring Steven Bernstein)
7. Mel’s Torment (featuring Rahsaan Roland Kirk)
8. Out There In The Random
9. Do Like Ya Like
10. Ya Damn Right
11. Say Yeah Yeah Yeah
12. Jive, Jive, Jive
13. Sho Nuff (featuring Rahsaan Roland Kirk, Bill Frisell, Charlie Hunter & Hal Willner)
14. JD

An Evening with Charlie Hunter, Thurs Sept 9 @ the Fox Theatre

As a young guitarist growing up in the San Francisco Bay Area, Charlie Hunter was looking for a way to stand out in the '80s. His primary influences were jazz great Joe Pass and the fluid Tuck Andress, (of the guitar/vocal duo Tuck & Patti), both six-string guitarists who were adept at blending bass notes into their standard guitar melodies to make themselves sound like two musicians at once. But Hunter wanted to take it one step further, and set out to find an instrument on which he could simultaneously function as both a guitarist and a bassist. For his self-titled 1993 debut CD, Hunter played a seven-string guitar for the duality effect, locking down the bottom with drummer Jay Lane and mixing melodically with saxophonist David Ellis. But on his trio's 1995 sophomore release, "Bing, Bing, Bing!," Hunter unveiled his custom-made Novax eight-string, the guitar that finally allowed him to realize his capacity. Designed by Ralph Novak, the instrument featured special frets and separate signals for its guitar and bass portions. Picking bass notes with his right thumb while fretting them with his left index finger (while at the same time fingerpicking guitar chords and single notes with his right hand's remaining four digits as he frets with his left hand's other three fingers), Hunter achieves the real sound of two-for-one.

Hunter played with the side group T.J. Kirk in the mid-'90s, a band that derived their name from the cover material they exclusively played: Thelonious Monk, James Brown and Rahsaan Roland Kirk. Initially wanting to call themselves James T. Kirk before being threatened by the Star Trek TV and film series, T.J. Kirk released a self-titled 1995 debut and the 1996 follow-up, "If Four Was One", before disbanding. Hunter took drummer Scott Amendola with him for his next project, an ambitious instrumental remake of Bob Marley's "Natty Dread"album in its entirety. Also featuring saxophonists Kenny Brooks and Calder Spanier, the 1997 release beat the odds by becoming arguably Hunter's best album. After Spanier died from injuries sustained from being hit by a car, Hunter moved east to New York, taking Amendola with him. Teaming with vibraphonist Stefon Harris and percussionist John Santos, Charlie Hunter & Pound for Pound's 1998 CD Return of the Candyman is dedicated to Spanier. A departure from Natty Dread, mainly due to the work of Harris, the disc featured a vibes-heavy cover of Steve Miller's "Fly Like an Eagle."

Hunter's modus operandi had now become shifting personnel changes, and in between tours he recorded a 1999 duo CD with drummer/percussionist Leon Parker and a self-titled 2000 CD that featured Parker and an otherwise ensemble cast. Hunter also contributed greatly to the 2000 comeback CD by drummer Mike Clark, "Actual Proof". Hunter concluded his run at Blue Note with 2001's "Songs from the Analog Playground", which saw him collaborating with vocalists for the first time, ranging from labelmates Norah Jones and Kurt Elling to Mos Def. 2003 found Hunter with a new label (Ropeadope) and two new bands (the Charlie Hunter Quintet) on "Right Now Move" and the beginning of Groundtruther, a partnership with percussionist/composer Bobby Previte.  They released "Come in Red Dog, This is Tango Leader" before adopting the Groundtruther moniker. For 2003's "Friends Seen and Unseen",  it was back to the Charlie Hunter Trio, with drummer  Derrek Phillips and saxman John Ellis, both members of the Quintet. By now, Groundtruther had taken on a life of its own, with Hunter and Previte joined by a rotating third member.  "Latitude" was first, in 2004 with saxophonist Greg Osby, followed by "Longitude" with DJ Logic in 2005.

In 2006, the Charlie Hunter Trio resurfaced with "Coperopolis" and almost immediately announced that it was disbanding as Ellis wanted to further pursue a solo career. What to do? Form another trio! After recruiting Erik Deutsch on keys and Simon Loft on drums, they released "Mistico" in the summer of 2007, Hunter's first album for Fantasy.

All Ages / GA  / $15.00 adv / $20 DOS

Internet 24-7 at www.foxtheater.com

Phone: During box office hours: 303.443.3399

Kirk Joseph's Backyard Groove | Bamboo Room

Not a person sitting down! Ok let me back up….