dylan

Tom Russell Joined By Calexico, Lucinda Williams, Van Dyke Parks On Cinematic 'Mesabi'

The Mesabi iron range juts into Minnesota, a desolate deposit of minerals and the birthplace of Bob Dylan. American composer and storyteller Tom Russell says that Bob Dylan inspired him to become an artist, and his new 'Mesabi' pays moving tribute with compelling tales that connect the iron range to the border town of Juarez, Mexico and the myth of Hollywood celebrity with cinematic, global revelry. 'Mesabi,' out Sept 6 on Shout! Factory, is a vast, interwoven collection of tales set to twangy rock, country and Mexican folk and features Calexico, Van Dyke Parks and Lucinda Williams.

Co-produced by Russell and keyboardist Barry Walsh, and recorded in several different studios in Tucson, Texas, Nashville and Los Angeles, 'Mesabi' is the 26th album from an artist whose songs have been recorded by such icons as Johnny Cash, Dave Van Ronk, Jerry Jeff Walker, Doug Sahm and Ramblin' Jack Elliott, among others.

'Mesabi' is thematically ambitious, drawing inspiration from American icons like Dylan, Elizabeth Taylor, James Dean and the perilous town of Juarez, Mexico, close to where Tom lives. Says Tom, "The puzzle is that [Juarez is] the most dangerous city in the world and El Paso, just over the bridge, is the safest city in the United States."

Along with the release of 'Mesabi,' 2011 has much in store for Tom. Filmmaker Monte Hellman ('Two-Lane Blacktop') demanded that Tom's new songs be included in his new film 'Road To Nowhere;' a book of 60 of Tom's paintings will be released this fall on Bang Tail Press; a documentary about Tom's life, 'Don't Look Down,' will be released soon; and he will be touring the US in September and October.

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'MESABI' TRACK LISTING:

1. Mesabi
2. When the Legends Die
3. Farewell Never Never Land
4. The Lonesome Death Of Ukulele Ike
5. Sterling Hayden
6. Furious Love (For Liz)
7. A Land Called "Way Out There"
8. Roll The Credits, Johnny
9. Heart Within A Heart
10. And God Created Border Towns
11. Goodnight, Juarez
12. Jai Alai
13. Love Abides

Bonus Tracks:
A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall
The Road To Nowhere

Tour dates and more info here.

David Bromberg's USE ME Tapes Friends

When David Bromberg, one of America’s finest roots musicians, emerged from a recording hiatus of 17 years with the solo, acoustic, traditional folk-blues album Try Me One More Time (Appleseed, 2007), fans and critics were thrilled, and the CD was rewarded with a Grammy nomination. For his follow-up album, Use Me, Bromberg chose a different approach: Why not ask some of his favorite singer-songwriters and musicians to write (or choose), produce, and perform on songs tailored to his versatile but distinctive skills as a guitarist and vocalist?

Answering David’s call were well-known artists from the many genres comprising the amorphous “Americana” musical category. Representing contemporary rootsy singer-songwriters: John Hiatt, the first musician Bromberg approached, who penned the pensive “Ride On Out a Ways” for him; for New Orleans “fonk,” Dr. John; there’s three-guitar jam band interplay with Widespread Panic and jug band music with Levon Helm (the sprightly “Bring It With You When You Come,” produced by Grammy-winning Larry Campbell). Linda Ronstadt puts in a rare appearance on a soulful Brook Benton ballad, Los Lobos contribute a Mexican-flavored waltz, Vince Gill and Tim O’Brien take care of the country and bluegrass quotient, Keb’ Mo’ brings the blues, and the hitmaking Butcher Brothers, producers Phil and Joe Nicolo (Bob Dylan, John Lennon, Cypress Hill, Nine Inch Nails), provide the languid R&B groove for the title song, a cover of Bill Withers’ classic “Use Me.”

The resultant album is due for July 12, 2011 release on Appleseed Records. A national tour will ensue.
Standout tracks change with each listening, but some of the high points include the crisp blues shuffle “Tongue,” the album’s lone Bromberg original, with Levon Helm on drums; “You Don’t Wanna Make Me Mad,” featuring David on slide guitar and Dr. John on piano; the ominous slow blues “Diggin’ in the Deep Blue Sea,” updated by Keb’ Mo’ and Gary Nicholson from Larry Davis’ “Texas Flood” to address the dangers of offshore drilling, and the chipper Vince Gill — Guy Clark co-write “Lookout Mountain Girl,” the only song on which David cedes most of the lead guitar duties (to Vince, although David splits the lead with Widespread Panic’s Jimmy Herring on “Old Neighborhood”).
Rather than collating individual instrumental parts literally phoned in to a central location, the recording sessions for Use Me generally took place on each guest artist’s home turf — in Woodstock (Levon Helm), New Orleans (Dr. John), Nashville (John Hiatt, Tim O’Brien, Vince Gill), Los Angeles (Los Lobos), and so on, to retain their regional flavors. For Bromberg, who started his professional career as an accompanist for everyone from Dion and Jay and the Americans to Bob Dylan and Willie Nelson, the sessions were simultaneously a throwback to his sideman days and a sidestep from his own recordings. “As artist and producer, I get to completely mold my vision of how the song should go,” he explains. “The drawback is that I don’t get many ideas that are not my own. It was fascinating for me to see the different approaches that everyone used in production.”
No matter who the producers, songwriters or accompanying musicians are on Use Me, Bromberg’s expressive guitar-playing and “rippling Fred Neil-like baritone that . . . brings warm, reassuring comfort” (Rolling Stone) remain the centerpiece of the CD, diamonds in golden settings.
Born in Philadelphia in 1945 and raised in Tarrytown, NY, “I listened to rock ’n’ roll and whatever else was on the radio,” says Bromberg. “I discovered Pete Seeger and The Weavers and, through them, Reverend Gary Davis. I then discovered Big Bill Broonzy, who led me to Muddy Waters and the Chicago blues. This was more or less the same time I discovered Flatt and Scruggs, which led to Bill Monroe and Doc Watson.”
Bromberg began studying guitar when he was 13 and eventually enrolled in Columbia University as a musicology major. The call of the Greenwich Village folk scene in the mid-’60s drew David to the downtown clubs and coffeehouses, where he could watch and learn from the best performers, including primary sources such as his inspiration and teacher, the Reverend Gary Davis.
Bromberg’s sensitive, blues-based approach to guitar-playing earned him jobs playing the Village “basket houses” for tips, the occasional paying gig, and lots of employment as a backing musician for Tom Paxton, Jerry Jeff Walker and Rosalie Sorrels, among others. He became a first-call, “hired gun” guitarist for recording sessions, playing on hundreds of records by artists including Bob Dylan (New Morning, Self Portrait, Dylan), Link Wray, The Eagles, Ringo Starr, Willie Nelson and Carly Simon. In the early ’90s, David produced an as-yet-unreleased Dylan album, although two tracks have been issued as part of Dylan’s “Bootleg Series.”
An unexpected and wildly successful solo spot at the 1970 Isle of Wight Festival in Great Britain led to a solo deal with Columbia Records, for whom David recorded four albums. His eponymous 1971 debut included the mock-anguished “Suffer To Sing the Blues,” a Bromberg original that became an FM radio staple, and “The Holdup,” a songwriting collaboration with former Beatle George Harrison on which Harrison also played slide guitar. David, who had met the Grateful Dead’s Jerry Garcia at the Woodstock Festival when they both took refuge from the rain in a tepee, wound up with four Dead members, including Garcia, playing on his next two albums.
Bromberg’s range of material, based in the folk and blues idioms, continually expanded with each new album to encompass bluegrass, ragtime, country and ethnic music, and his touring band grew apace. By the mid-’70s, the David Bromberg Big Band included horn-players, a fiddler, and several multi-instrumentalists, including David himself. Among the best-known Bromberg Band graduates: mandolinist Andy Statman, later a major figure in the Klezmer music movement in America, and fiddler Jay Ungar (who wrote the memorable “Ashokan Farewell” for Ken Burns’ PBS documentary, “The Civil War”).
Despite jubilant, loose-limbed concerts and a string of acclaimed albums on the Fantasy label, Bromberg found himself exhausted by the logistics of the music business. “I decided to change the direction of my life,” he explains. So David dissolved his band in 1980, and he and his artist/musician wife, Nancy Josephson, moved from Northern California to Chicago, where David attended the Kenneth Warren School of Violin Making. Though he still toured periodically, the recordings slowed to a trickle and then stopped.
After “too many Chicago winters,” in 2002 David and Nancy moved to Wilmington, Del., where they currently serve as unofficial “artists in residence” and where David established David Bromberg Fine Violins, a retail store and repair shop for high quality instruments. Frequent participation in the city’s weekly jam sessions helped rekindle Bromberg’s desire to perform music “live” again, and the encouragement of fellow musicians Chris Hillman (The Byrds, Desert Rose Band, Flying Burrito Brothers) and bluegrass wizard Herb Pedersen helped nudge him back into the recording studio. The Wilmington jams also led to the formation of Angel Band, fronted by Nancy and two other female vocalists, with David frequently serving as an accompanist.
Bromberg’s participation in his local and musical community has subsequently included a fund-raising music festival (Bromberg’s Big Noise in the Neighborhood) to help renovate a local theater, and a keynote address at this past spring’s Folk Alliance International convention, a non-profit organization of musicians, concert presenters and industry professionals.
David continues his musical revitalization with projects like Use Me, playing solo shows or backed by his own bluegrass quartet and reunions of the David Bromberg Big Band. Use your ears and catch him when you can!

John Prine at the Boulder Theater - 03.25.11

97.3 KBCO & the Daily Camera are proud to present John Prine at the Boulder Theater on Friday, March 25th, 2011.

The first time he got onstage to perform – at a Chicago open mic night – there was absolute silence. Here comes a guy nobody had ever seen, a mailman from nearby Maywood, and the very first songs he ever sings are miracles, songs like “Hello In There” and “Angel from Montgomery.” But this stunned silence spelled disaster to Prine. “They just sat there,” he said. “They didn’t even applaud, they just looked at me. I thought, `Uh oh. This is pretty bad.’ I started shuffling my feet and looking around. And then they started applauding and it was a really great feeling. It was like I found out all of a sudden that I could communicate deep feelings and emotions. And to find that out all at once was amazing.”

That one night changed his life. The club-owner offered him a gig, and from that moment on he quickly became one of Chicago’s most beloved local heroes, a guy who would honor the Windy City with as much love and grace as Studs Terkel and Carl Sandburg. Prine soon befriended another local hero, Steve Goodman, and with Goodman he met the world. Kris Kristofferson heard his songs, helped him land a record deal, and soon everyone knew what Chicago already did, that Prine was the real deal. From that first album on, he came known as a genuine “songwriter’s songwriter,” one of the rare ones who writes the songs other songwriters would sell their souls for.  Evidence of this is the long list of songwriters who have recorded his songs, including Johnny Cash, Bonnie Raitt, the Everly Brothers, John Denver, Kris Kristofferson, Carly Simon, Ben Harper, Joan Baez, and many others. Even Bob Dylan was stunned. “His stuff is pure Proustian existentialism,” said Bob Dylan.  . “He’s so good,” said Kristofferson, “we’re gonna have to break his fingers.”

Dylan and the rest were simply recognizing that which we have all come to know, that Prine’s songs are so hauntingly evocative of the laughter and tears inherent in the human condition, so purely precise and finely etched, that lines from them linger in our hearts and minds like dreams, separate from the songs. There’s the rodeo poster from “Angel from Montgomery,” the hole in daddy’s arm and the broken radio (from “Sam Stone”), the old trees that just grow stronger (from “Hello In There.”) The kinds of lines you carry around in your pocket, knowing they’re in there when you need them. With a staggering penchant for detail, a proclivity to be both hilarious and deeply serious (and often in the same song), and a visceral embrace  of roots music, he’s  made the kinds of songs nobody ever dreamed of before, or since.

Born on October 10th, 1946 in Maywood, he grew up spinning Roy Acuff and Hank Williams 78s in his dad’s collection, as well as tuning into WJJD to hear Webb Pierce, Lefty Frizell and others “back to back, all night long.” And then a new kind of music arrived: “I was coming of age just as rock and roll was invented,” he said, and along with his country heroes he added Elvis, Little Richard, Fats Domino, and the one he loved the most, Chuck Berry: “Because he told a story in less than three minutes.”

At 14 he started playing guitar and never stopped, starting with old folk tunes taught to him by his brother Dave. After high school he enlisted in the army, and was happy to be stationed in Germany, far from Viet Nam. He spent most of his time in the barracks playing guitar and singing Lefty Frizzell and Hank Williams songs with a friend.After the army, he became a mailman, which he loved because he could write songs while walking his familiar route. “It was like a library with no books,” he said.

He haunted the fringes of Chicago open mic nights, mostly at the old Fifth Peg on Armitage in Old Town. Once he summoned up the courage to perform, although terrified, he knew he was home. The rest is singer-songwriter history. It was 1971, the dream of the Sixties was over and Goodman and Prine emerged with a new kind of song, eschewing abstractions to write story songs about real people:  “Midwestern mindtrips to the nth degree,” as Dylan put it. Songs with the concrete details and imagery of a novel, but compounded, like Prine’s hero Chuck Berry’s songs, into mini-masterpieces.

After landing his first gig, he went home and wrote more masterpieces that made up his first self-titled debut, released in 1971. It was received with near-unanimous raves: “… absolutely one of the greatest albums ever made,” wrote a hometown paper, “by one of the most creative and evocative songwriters of our time.” There was the recognition then, which has been confirmed by the passage of time, that even among the best, he stood out. “Good songwriters are on the rise,” wrote Rolling Stone, “but John is differently good.”

Fans hungry for meaningful new music discovered him, unconcerned if he was the “new Dylan” or not, as he was often labeled, but drawn to the complex simplicity of his songs, the heady amalgam of sorrow and whimsy. Always seeking to strike a balance in his work, Prine said he wrote funny songs so as to get back to the tragic ones.

He made eight albums on two major labels, including Sweet Revenge, Common Sense, and Bruised Orange. In 1980 he moved to Nashville, and with longtime manager Al Bunetta, formed his own label, Oh Boy Records in 1981. They’ve since released a chain of great records, including 1991’s Grammy-winning The Missing Years, which featured cameos by Bruce Springsteen and Tom Petty. In 2000 he recaptured his own legacy by recording Souvenirs, new recordings of many of his classic songs.

In 1998 he was diagnosed with a rare form of cancer centered in his neck. The removal of a tumor and subsequent radiation seems to have eradicated it completely. Although his singing voice was lowered significantly, he faced his illness with the same blend of wistful humor he instills in his songs. In a post-surgery letter to his fans, he wrote, “Hopefully my neck is looking forward to its job of holding my head up above my shoulders.”

Now he’s back with a brand new live album, John Prine: In Person & On Stage, which contains both solo and duet renditions of some of early songs such as “Angel From Montgomery” (here in a breathtaking duet with Emmylou Harris) as well as later classics such as “Unwed Fathers” (with Iris DeMent) and one of the most poignant songs ever from a husband to a wife, “She Is My Everything.”

“If he’s this good this young,” wrote Rolling Stone in 1971, “time should be on his side.” Truer words have rarely been written. Some four decades since his remarkable debut, Prine has stayed at the top of his game, both as a performer and songwriter. Recently honored at the Library of Congress, he has been elevated from the annals of songwriters into the realm of bonafide American treasures.  Poet Laureate Ted Kooser introduced him at the Library of Congress by likening him to Raymond Carver for making “monuments of ordinary lives.” But the greatest testaments to his lasting legacy are the songs themselves. Unlike so many which belong only to the time in which they emerged, his, like the old trees in “Hello In There,” seem to just grow stronger with the passing years.

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Tickets are on sale at Boulder Theater Box Office. Call (303) 786-7030 for tickets by phone.

Tickets are also available through our website @ www.bouldertheater.com.

Tickets are On Sale Saturday, February 5th!

$40 GA / $48.50 Res / $65 Gold Circle

Nathan Moore To Release 'Dear Puppeteer' Feb. 1

Nathan Moore has announced the release of Dear Puppeteer, his latest collection of songs, due February 1 on Royal Potato Family. The Staunton, Virginia-based singer and songwriter recorded the album around his home in the Shenandoah Valley with co-producer and guitarist Bryan Elijah Smith, as well as, out West at his previous Santa Fe, New Mexico stomping grounds, Frogville Studios.

Dear Puppeteer could best be described as a letter in 13 songs from Nathan Moore to the puppet masters: fear, mortality, the righteous, the jailor, lost love and lost time. On the title track, Moore sings: “Gonna write a letter, dear puppeteer, I don’t want to play here, I don’t wanna stay here." From this simple plea it's apparent that a restless spirit is at work. Nathan's warm fingerpicked acoustic guitar, ghostly harmonica gales, ancient ukulele meditations and tobacco-stained vocals are inhabited by a poet seeking something better, while giving song to the human condition in all of its beauty and sadness.

A crowning achievement from one of this generation's most prolific songwriters, Dear Puppeteer is Nathan Moore's ninth studio album to date. It follows 2009's well-received EP, Folk Singer, which led Paste Magazine to write, "The sharp, introspective lyrics of Nathan Moore draw an instant connection to the great folk singers of the past." The UK's Maverick Magazine said, "Many have come and many have tried, but we may finally have a storytelling successor to Dylan, Van Zandt and Cash." Moore, who first came to national attention as a founding member of ThaMuseMeant, also currently fronts the revered American rock band Surprise Me Mr. Davis.

Check out some coverage of Nathan Moore on The Grateful Web. | Stream debut track "Hollow" here

Dear Puppeteer track listing:

1. Like A Cartoon

2. Safe To Say

3. Dear Puppeteer

4. In The Basement

5. A Little Crazy

6. I'm The Same

7. The Garden

8. Hollow

9. Can't Fly To Heaven

10. When My Time Comes

11. Train Of Thoughts

12. Choose Thy Love

13. I'm Good Company

Old 97's at the Boulder Theater

Old 97’s make their triumphant return on October 12th with The Grand Theater Volume One, their eighth studio album, from New West Records.  The band, who Rolling Stone says have “evolved…into master-class rock & roll songwriters,” recorder over two dozen brand new songs during the studio sessions and will be releasing a second volume in 2011.  The 12 song album was once again produced by Salim Nourallah (the band’s previous release, Blame It On Gravity) and engineered by Jim Vollentine (Spoon).  Legendary for their blistering live performances, the Old 97’s spent a week of pre-production recording the new songs completely live at the nearly 100-year old (and reportedly haunted) Dallas venue Sons of Hermann Hall.  The band set up on stage like they normally do during concerts, so it was instantly conducive to whether or not certain new songs would translate well in a live atmosphere.  After deciding what new songs make made the cut for proper recording, the band moved the production to Treefort Studios in Austin, TX.  Basic tracks for these studio sessions were recorded mostly live, resulting in an album that is as vibrant, immediate and sweat drenched as their praised live show.  Frontman Rhett Miller stated, “The Old 97’s have hit a great stride, found our second wind.  I feel like we found the secret to capturing the live energy people rave about after they see us play.”

The Grand Theatre Volume One was predominantly written during Rhett Miller’s 2009 solo tour abroad.  The lyrics are filled with character studies while the sound – expertly rounded out by band members Murry Hammond, Ken Bethea and Philip Peeples – is Garage-Rock=meets-60’s-British Invasion without abandoning the classic 97’s sound.  Rhett Miller offered, “The Grand Theatre centers around a suite of songs I wrote during a month-long tour of England, Ireland and Scandanavia.  Opening for the great Steve Earle meant watching a master Texas songwriter at work and I soaked up these strange surroundings and turned them into songs.  I was writing at a furious cli in the midst of the most intense kinds of planes, trains and automobiles.  I can see an epistolary strain running through the songs.  All my years of Anglophillia make these fell like a collection of love letters, or a collection of letters home.  I wrote the title track in the dressing room of Leeds’ Grand Theatre.”

The album’s first single, “Every Night Is Friday Night (Without You)” is an exuberant rocker.  “Like a lot of songs on The Grand Theatre, “Every Night…” is more complicated than it first appears.  The speaker has some issues.  What can I say?  The Old 97’s have been making anger and depression sound fun since 1993” said Miller. “Champaign, Illinois” re-imagines Bob Dylan’s classic Highway 61 Revisited track, “Desolation Row” with brand new lyrics by Rhett Miller.  Miller said, “The one song on the record that dates further back is ‘Champaign, Illinois.’  A few years ago, during a long, late-night drive through Southern Illinois, I kept myself awake by rewriting the lyrics to ‘Desolation Row.’  I played it around live a little, but never recorded it for fear of repercussions from Dylan’s legal team.  When the 97’s were putting this record together, we kept bringing “Champaign” up with a sort of bittersweet longing, sad that we would never be able to use it.  Finally, it occurred to me, “Why not?”  Through a series of phone calls, Dylan’s manager approached the legend with a live recording of the tune from the old Café Largo in Hollywood.  I couldn’t believe it when word came back through the channels that Dylan liked the tune but wanted to read they lyrics.  I never typed faster.  Apparently, Dylan liked it enough that, not only did he approve the release, but he wanted to split the publishing 50/50 with the band.  A co-write with Bob Dylan, even in absentia, is an enormous honor.  What a cool dude.”

An Old 97’s record would not be complete without songs from bassist Murry Hammond.  He has two strong contributions on The Grand Theatre Volume One, “You Smoke Too Much” and “You Were Born To Be In A Battle.”  Like Miller’s songs, Hammond has a highly literate style yet harkens back to an older school of writing, which creates a balance on the record.  Speaking of the record, Hammond stated “I’m a big 60s garage punk fan, and my favorite moments on this record have a thick vibe in that direction…while I’m proud of my stab at 60s Johnny Cash in ‘Born To Be In a Battle.’ I’m just as thrilled as the way the bass generally bubbles all over the place and the background and harmony vocals swim in the old plate reverb.  It gives me that same smile I get listening to my heroes the Zombies, Chocolate Watchband, Syd Barrett, etc.  I’m proud of how the band can be garage and raw but very Technicolor at the same time.  This is one of my top favorite records of ours.”

Old 97’s

Boulder Theater

Thursday, January 27th

Doors:  8:00 pm

Show Time:  9:00 pm

All Ages

Judy Collins' Elektra albums to be reissued on Collectors' Choice

Collectors’ Choice Music will reissue nine albums by Judy Collins, one of the great interpretive folksingers of our time, representing a good portion of her Elektra Records years from 1966-97. Collins’ clear soprano, unerring taste and uncommon sensitivity to her material has enriched songs by everybody from Bob Dylan to Jacques Brel to Stephen Sondheim, and while she began her career by interpreting the work of others, she would become an acclaimed songwriter as well. Her fearless approach to trying new arrangements, instrumentation and repertoire has made her albums among the most absorbing and fulfilling of any singer-songwriter releases.

On July 27, 2010, Collectors’ Choice will issue digitally remastered CDs of nine of Collins’ Elektra titles: Fifth Album (1965), In My Life (1966), Whales & Nightingales (1970), True Stories & Other Dreams (1973), Bread & Roses (1976), Running for My Life (1980), Times of Our Lives (1982), Home Again (1984) and Christmas at the Biltmore (1997). The albums contain newly commissioned liner notes by Ritchie Unterberger that include interviews with Collins.

According to Collectors’ Choice Senior Vice President Gordon Anderson, “Judy Collins is one of those artists we always dreamed of reissuing, but never dreamed we would get the chance. We are thrilled to release these legendary albums on Collectors’ Choice with the love and respect they deserve.”

Fifth Album: This 1965 release, which charted #69 on the Billboard album chart, cemented Collins’ status as the foremost interpreter of the best 1960s songwriters to emerge from the folk revival. In addition to songs by Gordon Lightfoot, Phil Ochs, Eric Anderson, Tom Paxton, John Phillips and Richard Fariña, the album contains three Bob Dylan compositions, two of which (“Tomorrow Is a Long Time,” “Daddy You’ve Been on My Mind”) he didn’t release on his own records in the ’60s. The Mark Abramson-produced recording featured John Sebastian on harmonica, Danny Kalb and Eric Weissberg on guitars, and Fariña on dulcimer.

• In My Life: Collins’ 1966 album In My Life saw her make a bold leap from the folk-grounded arrangements and material of her previous work into a hybrid of folk, classical and pop that was dubbed “baroque folk.” Joshua Rifkin, fresh from the Baroque Beatles Book, arranged and conducted. In addition to the first appearances of Leonard Cohen songs on any release, this album, which reached #65 on the charts, includes compositions by Bob Dylan, Donovan, the Beatles, Richard Fariña, Jacues Brel (to whom she was turned on to by Elektra founder Jac Holzman) and a then-unknown Randy Newman.

• Whales & Nightingales: For Collins’ 1970 album Whales & Nightingales, producer Abramson left the confines of the studio to record at such locations as Carnegie Hall, the Manhattan Center and St. Paul’s Chapel at Columbia University. Holzman recalls in his book Follow the Music: “We decided to pick locations that matched the emotional ambience of the songs we were recording.” The album includes unusual treatments of traditional folk songs (the haunting “Farewell to Tarwathie” includes recordings of whales), as well as songs by Bob Dylan, Joan Baez and Jacques Brel. Collins’ hit version of “Amazing Grace,” featuring her then-boyfriend Stacy Keach, is on this release.

True Stories & Other Dreams:
Having exquisitely interpreted virtually every songwriter of note from the ’60s, Collins began including a few of her own songs on her albums (beginning with 1967’s Wildflowers). She brought her own songwriting to the fore on this 1973 release, contributing over half the material. In addition to five Collins originals, the album contains the Top 40 hit “Cook With Honey,” penned by Valerie Carter. Also featured is Tom Paxton’s “The Hostage,” written in the wake of the Attica prison riots and a 7 1/12-minute song titled “Che” about revolutionary Che Guevara. The album rose to #17 on the album chart.

• Bread & Roses: For the title track of this Top 30 1976 LP, Collins’ friend Mimi Fariña set to music the poem after which she’d named her humanitarian organization Bread & Roses. The album also features an eclectic group of composers including Leonard Cohen, Elton John, Duke Ellington and Chilean singer-songwriter-activist Victor Jara, with production by Arif Mardin and engineering by Phil Ramone. Players included Hugh McCracken, guitar; David Sanborn, sax; and Tony Levin, bass.

Running for My Life: This 1980 album marked the first occasion on which Judy Collins claimed sole production credit for one of her LPs. It was also notable for her spot-on performances of two songs from Stephen Sondheim’s Sweeney Todd (she was no stranger to Sondheim’s work, having had a hit with “Send in the Clowns” in the mid-’70s). Songs also include a Jacques Brel composition (“Marieke,” which Collins had recorded previously but wanted to revisit), and one by Larry Gatlin (“I’ve Done Enough Dyin’ Today”).

• Times of Our Lives: This album, released in ’82, once again demonstrates that Collins is a singer capable of covering just about any kind of material as she deftly interprets three songs by country hit songwriter Hugh Prestwood (author of Randy Travis’ 1990 #1 hit “Hard Rock Bottom of Your Hearty”), a tune by Anna McGarrigle (“Sun Son”) and five of her own. Featuring musicians Hugh McCracken, Tony Levin and banjoist Bill Keith, Rolling Stone called this album her best since 1973’s True Stories & Other Dreams.

• Home Again: Collins’ final studio album for Elektra, released in 1984, features her own composition “Shoot First,” which benefited the National Alliance Against Violence. It also features a duet with country star T.G. Sheppard on the title track (with lyrics by Gerry Goffin) and a co-write with Elton John, “Sweetheart on Parade,” which John never recorded on his own albums. The album contains the Henry Gross composition “Everyone Works in China.” Producers were the jazz-steeped team of Dave Grusin and Larry Rosen.

Christmas at the Biltmore: Following albums on such labels as Geffen and Gold Castle, Collins returned to Elektra for the 1997 soundtrack to a holiday special on the A&E cable network. Recorded live in an intimate setting at the Biltmore Estate in North Carolina, this record proves once again that Collins’ powers of interpretation really know no time or season as she makes these familiar songs her own. Includes “Joy to the World,” “Silver Bells,” “Santa Claus Is Coming to Town,” “Jingle Bells” and even a version of “The Night Before Christmas” with new words penned by Collins.

Acoustic STEAL YOUR FACE - This Thursday

Dynamic psychedelic jams, deep-funk grooves, tight emotional vocals, a little space and enough rocket fuel to get there and back - STEAL YOUR FACE is a high-energy band.  Born from the Spirit of Jerry Garcia, Steal Your Face blends thought provoking original music with the vast library of the Grateful Dead, Bob Dylan and other Classics.  Each SYF show is a unique experience, audiences are captivated as they and the band push each other to new heights and make music together. Five musicians with impressive chops who are constantly intertwining with each other and the audience,  Steal Your Face has a fresh sound that has the Woodstock generation reminiscing, the Bonnaroo kids screaming for more and everyone dancing.

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This Thursday, a unique evening of Acoustic Steal Your Face.  No cover charge. -- Thursday April 8, at The Temperance House, 5 S. State St. Newtown, PA.   215-860-9975  7:30pm-11pm.

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Upcoming Shows
Apr 8 2010 8:00P
Acoustic SYF at The Temperance House Newtown, Pennsylvania
Apr 20 2010 8:00P
ACOUSTIC SYF @ Chickies and Pete’s Northeast Philadelphia Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Apr 24 2010 9:00P
The Temperance House Newtown, Pennsylvania
Apr 30 2010 9:30P
The Hollywood Tavern Rockledge
May 1 2010 9:30P
with THINK PINK FLOYD at Street Road Bar and Grill Bensalem, Pennsylvania
May 14 2010 9:00P
The Temperance House Newtown, Pennsylvania
May 15 2010 3:00P
Timmy N Kimmy’s Barn Raising Fiesta Levittown, Pennsylvania
May 15 2010 7:00P
Watkins Glen ’Summer Jam’ 1973 Revival Ardmore, Pennsylvania
May 22 2010 2:00P
NAM JAM Dover, Delaware
May 28 2010 10:00P
Triumph Brewing Company NEW HOPE
Jun 10 2010 7:00P
ACOUSTIC SYF @ The Temperance House Newtown, Pennsylvania
Jun 12 2010 1:00P
In And Out Of The Garden We Go Music Festival Morrisville, Pennsylvania
Jun 19 2010 9:00P
The Temperance House Newtown, Pennsylvania
Jul 29 2010 7:00P
Acoustic SYF at The Temperance House Newtown
Aug 21 2010 8:30P
The Temperance House Newtown, Pennsylvania

Jakob Dylan & Three Legs ft: Neko Case & Kelly Hogan

Live radio show with Nick and Helen Forster featuring music and conversation with the Jakob Dylan & Three Legs (ft: Neko Case, Kelly Hogan, Paul Rigby, Jon Rauhouse, Tom Ray & Barry Mirochnick). Being the son of one of the most influential, innovative, eccentric, and unique songwriters in the history of Western pop music probably opened some doors for Jakob Dylan when he started his own musical career, but being Bob Dylan's son was just as likely a heavy load to carry as well, and the good news is that the younger Dylan has handled the pressure with relative élan.
He studied at private schools in L.A. and New York, and eased into the music business in the late '80s when he formed the Wallflowers with guitarist Tobi Miller, keyboard player Rami Jaffee, bassist Barrie Maguire, and drummer Peter Yanowitz. Featuring a classic heartland sound that was closer to Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers or John Mellencamp than it was to anything Bob Dylan recorded, the band signed to Virgin and released a self-titled debut album in 1992, but it sold poorly and Virgin dropped the band.
Dylan assembled a second version of the Wallflowers -- guitarist Michael Ward, bassist Greg Richling, and drummer Mario Calire -- keeping only Jaffee. The "new" group signed to Interscope Records and recorded its second album with producer (and Dylan family friend) T Bone Burnett. Bringing Down the Horse was released in 1996, producing the alternative radio hit "6th Avenue Heartache." A second single from the album, "One Headlight," followed later in the year, and by the spring of 1997 it had become a Top Ten hit, firmly establishing the Wallflowers as a legitimate commercial band, and while the media naturally played up Dylan's connection to his iconic father, the Wallflowers had their own sound and Jakob's similarities to his dad as both a singer and a songwriter were only occasional at best. A third single from Bringing Down the Horse, "The Difference," was issued in 1997, and the album hung on as a big seller throughout 1997, and in 1998 "One Headlight" won Grammys for Best Rock Song and Best Rock Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal.
The obvious next move would have been to rush out a third album, but Dylan and the Wallflowers instead took a long four-year break from recording, returning in October 2000 to release Breach. The album, although quite impressive, went largely ignored. The more mainstream Red Letter Days appeared a year later in 2001, and following a two-year hiatus, Rebel, Sweetheart was issued in 2003, closing out the band's deal with Interscope. Dylan signed a solo contract with Columbia Records, his dad's longtime label, in 2006, and issued the acoustic-based Seeing Things, produced by Rick Rubin and recorded at Rubin's Hollywood Hills studio, under his own name in 2008, leaving the status of the Wallflowers up in the air. Jakob's new record, "Women & Country" will drop April 6, 2010.
In 2006, SPIN Magazine called Neko Case "one of pop music's best" voices, and Interview Magazine hailed her album Fox Confessor Brings The Flood as "one of the most original, beguiling, honest records of the year." The album also earned Case Female Artist of the Year honors from the PLUG Independent Music Awards, and a Top 10 placement in the Village Voice's annual Pazz and Jop Critics Poll of the year's best releases. Fox Confessor was Case's first album to debut in the Billboard Top 100, and has sold nearly 200,000 copies in the U.S. alone.

Kelly's Hogan's voice is so versatile it can wrap itself around any song, in any style, be it torchy jazz, country weepers, soul-fueled bump and grinders or long-lost pop nuggets, and transform them into something all her own. Hogan began to hone her mellifluously spooky welter of torch songs and honky tonk anthems when she fronted the legendary peg-legged cabaret quartet, The Jody Grind, and then fanned the flames of her bummer-rock fixation while playing guitar for Orbisonic southern gothic punks, The Rock*A*Teens. She has also kept her bad self busy with appearances on some clever and popular Bloodshot compilations, and she did a split single with Neko Case. The past few years has seen Kelly singing with fellow Georgians the Drive By Truckers, the kiddie-punk ensemble Wee Hairy Beasties, the hopped up jazz combo The Wooden Leg and recording and touring with Neko Case as her back up singer.
Sunday March 28, 8pm
97.3 KBCO presents
e-TOWN: Jakob Dylan & Three Legs
ft: Neko Case & Kelly Hogan
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Tickets are on sale through the Boulder Theater box office | Internet 24-7 at www.bouldertheater.com | Phone: During box office hours 303-786-7030

Dylan, Cash, Miles + More at Morrison Hotel's 30th St. Exhibit

Miles Davis - photos by Don Hunstein- for the Grateful Web

On July 18 the Morrison Hotel Gallery's Soho loft (116 Prince Street, NYC) will offer the first fine art photography exhibit drawn from the extensive Sony BMG archive. "In Session at the Columbia Records 30th Street Studio" will feature candid, in-the-studio photographs taken mostly by Columbia Records' in-house photographer Don Hunstein, at its legendary 30th Street Studio in New York City. The exhibit will feature over 30 limited edition fine art silver gelatin prints - many of them never-before-seen - of singular figures such as Bob Dylan, Johnny Cash, Billie Holiday, Tony Bennett, Miles Davis, Muhammad Ali, and Charles Mingus among others. Prior to the exhibit's public opening, the Morrison Hotel Gallery will host invitation-only previews of "In Session" on July 17.

In 1949, an abandoned Armenian Greek Orthodox church at 207 East 30th Street, between 2nd and 3rd Avenue in Manhattan, was transformed into one of the world's greatest recording studios, where some of the most dynamic and enduring records were created. From Bob Dylan's "Highway 61 Revisited" to Leonard Bernstein's "West Side Story," from Miles Davis's "Kind Of Blue" to Glenn Gould's interpretations of Bach's "Goldberg Variations," the 30th Street Studio provided a distinctive ambience, featuring a kaleidoscope of sublime sonic qualities unparalleled in the recording industry.

Though the building itself was demolished, "In Session" frames the momentous occasions that occurred within the 30th Street Studio walls and allows fans to hold on to them forever.

Each print to be featured in this exhibit was meticulously hand selected by the Morrison Hotel Gallery and Sony BMG's ICON Collectibles (www.Icon-Collectibles.com), and represents a piece of musical history. Prints by Don Huntstein are numbered and signed by the photographer, who still lives in New York, and plans to attend the 'In Session' preview events. Prints will also be available for sale at morrisonhotelgallery.com.

About The Morrison Hotel Gallery
Founded in 2001 by former record company executive and producer Peter Blachley, former independent record store owner Rich Horowitz and music photographer Henry Diltz, The Morrison Hotel Gallery has grown to become the major brand in fine art music photography. With already thriving locations in Soho in NYC, La Jolla California, and Los Angeles, MHG opened their largest location to date in March 2008, at 313 Bowery Street in NYC, former home to the legendary CBGB Gallery.

About ICON Collectibles
ICON Collectibles is a business specializing in selling unique Fine Art Prints, Music Plaques, Cover Art and one-of-a-kind memorabilia featuring a diversified collection of some of the world's greatest recording artists including: Bob Dylan, Tony Bennett, Miles Davis, Johnny Cash, Ella Fitzgerald and Muhammad Ali. All offerings are showcased and sold on Icon-Collectibles.com. Powered by SONY BMG Music Entertainment, ICON Collectibles is headquartered in New York City.

Dylan Wins First Grammy in Contemporary Folk/Americana

dylanOn Sunday night Bob Dylan won the first GRAMMY Award in the genre of Contemporary Folk/Americana, with his album, Modern Times (Columbia).

Other nominees for Best Contemporary Folk/Americana Album (vocal or instrumental) were Solo Acoustic Vol. 1 by Jackson Browne (Inside Recordings), Black Cadillac by Rosanne Cash (Capitol), Workbench Songs by Guy Clark (Dualtone Music Group) and All The Roadrunning by Mark Knopfler and Emmylou Harris (Warner Bros./Nonesuch).

"Bob Dylan set the stage for the current Americana genre as a folk pioneer in the 60s. His GRAMMY win for Modern Times as Best Contemporary Folk/Americana Album is just another example of his continuing vitality as an artist," said Americana Music Association President Tamara Saviano. "We're excited to celebrate Dylan as Americana's first GRAMMY win."

Americana is American roots music based on the traditions of country with influences ranging from hillbilly and R&B to folk and bluegrass and blues. The radio format developed during the 1990s to counter the highly polished mainstream music sound of the decade. Dylan's Modern Times spent six weeks at #1 on the national Americana/R&R chart.

Best Contemporary Folk/Americana Album was among the awards that were presented Sunday night during the 49th GRAMMY Awards. The GRAMMY Awards honor recordings in 108 categories across 31 fields, from rap to classical.

The Americana Music Association is a professional trade organization that provides a forum for the advocacy of Americana music and promotes public awareness of the genre to support the creative and economic viability of professionals in the field. Upcoming is its 8th Annual Americana Music Conference Oct. 31-Nov. 3, 2007 in Nashville.