march

Chris Shiflett & The Dead Peasants: Debut Self-Titled Album Out 7/13/10

Chris Shiflett & The Dead Peasants is a new project from Shiflett, already known as the lead guitarist for Foo Fighters and the frontman for Jackson United. Steeped in his love for classic country artists (Johnny Cash, Waylon Jennings), rockabilly (Gene Vincent, Eddie Cochran), and deep-rooted rock bands (The Rolling Stones, The Replacements), this new album is packed with soulful pedal steel- and twang guitar-accented songs. The album highlights his talent and versatility not only as a skillful guitarist, but also as a songwriter. These infectious Americana-laced rock songs are some of the best he's penned, from the chiming keys and buoyant, ringing guitars of "Get Along" to the pedal steel- and mandolin-lined heartache of "Bandaged," and from the spry, Old 97s-ian "Baby, Let It Out" to the rueful country swing of "Death March."

Shiflett wrote the songs on Chris Shiflett & The Dead Peasants over the course of 2008-9, inspiration first striking when a friend asked him to perform at Orange County's punk-rockabilly Hootenanny festival in 2008. After re-immersing himself in his Americana and old country music collection to prepare a short set - and then playing a brief acoustic tour with friend Joey Cape of Lagwagon - he began writing what eventually became the new album. Recorded at the Foo Fighters' Studio 606 in Los Angeles, CA, this past December and January, the core band on Chris Shiflett & The Dead Peasants is Shiflett (vocals, guitar), 606 house engineer John Lousteau (drums, in addition to engineering), and Derek Silverman (keyboards). The album's additional instrumentation was performed by an array of fine musicians, including Davey Faragher (Elvis Costello and The Imposters, Jenny Lewis, John Hiatt) on bass, Greg Leisz (Wilco, Lucinda Williams, Whiskeytown) on pedal steel, Stevie Blacke (Beck, Weezer, Colbie Caillat) on violin and mandolin, and Audra Mae on backing vocals.

Track listing for Chris Shiflett & The Dead Peasants:

  1. Helsinki
  2. Get Along
  3. Bandaged
  4. God Damn
  5. Burning Lights (Joe Strummer cover)
  6. An Atheist's Player
  7. Not Going Down Alone
  8. Baby, Let It Out
  9. Death March

Summer touring news for Chris Shiflett & The Dead Peasants will be announced soon.

THE 40th ANNIVERSARY of the Grateful Dead at HARPUR COLLEGE

1970's intense. T.C. leaves the band in late January. The band's 'busted down on Bourbon Street' on January 31st. In March they discover their manager, Mickey Hart's father Lenny, has been stealing them blind (they're already hugely in debt to the record company). Only the music is sane; they enter the studio in March and in three weeks record Workingman's Dead, fulfilling Garcia and Hunter's work of the past year. It comes out in June. They add a regular opening act, the New Riders of the Purple Sage (Garcia plays pedal steel in it), and their shows stretch ever longer. Late that month they cross Canada on the Festival Express. In September they have some spare time, and go back into the studio, producing another gem, American Beauty. In the fall they begin a long series of college concerts that will establish them (along with the two albums) in a long-term way as a touring band.

“Finally I have the quality I’ve been looking for on this famous date. There are so many outrageous things that stand out on this date, that I hesitate to list them all. There are a few places where the quality “garbles” of fades in & out, during the “Anthem” & “Viola Lee Blues”, but outside of this everything is excellent. In “Cold Rain & Snow”, Garcia tunes up several times & really gets into singing with gusto, like I’ve never heard this tune. There is a really nice riff from “Dark Star” that they do during the end of “Dancing in the Streets”. During the Acoustic Set, there is one point where Garcia & Weir lecture the noisy audience about being a more “respectable audience.”

Dick Latvala

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THE 40th ANNIVERSARY of the Grateful Dead at HARPUR COLLEGE

May 2, 1970

The Zen Tricksters Will perform the entire show forty years to the day on May 2, 2010 at Brooklyn Bowl

Tickets: $5.00

Online ticketing

Venue phone: 718-963-3369

Doors: 7:00pm | Show: 8:00pm

Brooklyn Bowl Website

Freda Payne Tribute To Ella Fitzgerald

Freda Payne, celebrated R&B and jazz vocalist, who shot to fame with her #1 Hit, “Band of Gold,” and “Bring the Boys Home,” pays tribute to the legendary Ella Fitzgerald, as no one else can! Payne, the star of such Broadway shows as Jelly’s Last Jam, Sophisticated Ladies and Blues in the Night, “conjures the spirit of Ella” with her renditions of “A-Tisket, a-Tasket,” “Sweet Georgia Brown,” “It Don’t Mean a Thing.” and “Mack the Knife,” as well as many other Fitzgerald classics.

The Iridium Jazz Club is pleased to present soul, jazz and R&B diva Ms. Freda Payne in a very special Tribute To Ella Fitzgerald Thursday through Sunday, March 25 through March 28th.

IRIDIUM JAZZ CLUB
1650 BROADWAY (Corner of 51st)
NEW YORK, NY 10023
RESERVATIONS: 212-582-2121
http://www.iridiumjazzclub.com/
SETS AT 8:00 & 10:00PM

YMSB & Leftover Salmon @ Red Rocks

Leftover Salmon is excited to announce it will join Yonder Mountain String Band at Red Rocks this August for a historic night of Colorado string music!

Tickets through our fan ticketing are on sale now HERE. The general public on sale will be this Saturday March 27th through Ticketmaster or in Denver at the Ogden and Bluebird Theatre box offices.

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This Weekend Suwannee Springfest!
On Saturday March 27th Leftover Salmon will perform at the Suwannee Springfest in Live Oak, Florida. Salmon will headline Saturday night with two full sets of music at 10:30PM. This will be the first time the band has performed in Florida since their hiatus at the end of 2004. We're looking forward to getting out of snowy Colorado for the weekend! We hope you'll join us for this great event in the sunshine state!
Suwannee Springfest- Live Oak, Florida March 25 -28 2010!
confirmed line up:
Leftover Salmon
Donna the Buffalo
Robert Earl Keene
Peter Rowan
Dirty Dozen Brass Band
Ruthie Foster
Jim Lauderdale
The Steeldrivers
Belleville Outfit
and more
www.magmusic.com

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TELLURIDE!

Leftover Salmon is excited to announce our return to the Telluride Bluegrass Festival. LOS will headline Friday June 18th. Other bands on this year's lineup include Béla Fleck, Zakir Hussain & Edgar Meyer; Del McCoury Band; Hot Rize; Punch Brothers; Josh Ritter Band; Edward Sharpe & the Magnetic Zeros; the Telluride House Band featuring Sam, Béla, Jerry, Edgar, Bryan & Stuart; and many, many more. 2010 festival tickets and camping are on sale on now at www.bluegrass.com!

BRITISH SINGER-SONGWRITER BOBBY LONG RETURNS TO U.S. FOR 2010 TOUR

British singer-songwriter Bobby Long returns to American shores this week, kicking off a tour that will include his first appearances at the annual South By Southwest Conference (SxSW) in Austin, Texas. Long, whose 2009 "Dangerous Summer" tour of the U.S. and Canada comprised more than 100 shows and was extended through December, will begin his 2010 U.S. run at World Café Live in Philadelphia on Saturday, March 13. Following the string of his own shows, Long will join popular Philadelphia indie band matt pond PA (mppa) for 16 shows during May in support their new album The Dark Leaves.

Bobby Long will also be the special guest on WXPN Radio's weekly Free@Noon broadcast, live from Philadelphia this Friday, March 12. Last fall, WXPN began playing cuts from Long's DIRTY POND SONGS CD-a collection he recorded in his London bedroom to be available exclusively at his shows-and made him their "World Café Next" artist of the week in December. The broadcast will be streamed live at www.xpn.org and www.npr.org.

Long is also set for several performances at SxSW next week: Thursday, March 18 at 11PM at the Hilton Garden Inn Creekside as part of "The Bedford at SxSW" event, Friday, March 19 at 2PM at Bug Music's event at the Continental Club and again at 7PM at the SxSW Second Play Stage at the Hilton Hotel Austin. His final SxSW appearance will take place on Sunday, March 21 at 1PM at the UHCU Headliner Stage. Other highlights of the spring tour will be appearances at the eclectic Bamboozle Festival on both coasts, the March 28 event at Anaheim Stadium in California and the May 1 event at the Meadowlands in East Rutherford, New Jersey.

Long started the year with three weeks of shows in Europe, playing several countries for the first time.  He is currently recording his much-anticipated debut studio album for release later in the year with producer Liam Watson (The White Stripes' "Elephant") at the helm. "I'm feeling really good about it all," he says.  "I'm really pleased with the time in the studio and to have had an opportunity to work with amazing musicians and with a producer like Liam Watson.  Everyone worked together, and I really feel like we have put together a great sound and something that will make people stand up and listen. I've recorded around 18 songs and now just have to pick the ones for the album."

He has already sold more than 10,000 copies of the 10-song collection of original material called DIRTY POND SONGS.  "Left to Lie" and "The Bounty of Mary Jane" from that CD are available for download from iTunes and other digital outlets.  "Let Me Sign," a song he co-wrote with Marcus Foster, is part of the American Music Award-winning soundtrack of the blockbuster film "Twilight."  He has also compiled a new DANGEROUS SUMMER TOUR CD of live performances from his marathon 2009 tour, which will be available for sale at the upcoming shows.  Included in that collection are some of his newer compositions, "The Borough Mill," "In the Frost," "My Darling Bell" and "Girl From the Keys," among them.

Fans first discovered his compelling brand of acoustic music via the film, YouTube and his continually-updated MySpace page (www.myspace.com/musicbobbylong), which is now closing in on two million page views.  Music critics and selected radio programmers have jumped on the Long bandwagon early, praising both his songwriting and his style.


BOBBY LONG 2010 U.S. TOUR:

March 12--13-World Café Live Upstairs, Philadelphia; March 15-Mercury Lounge, New York City; March 16-Poor David's Pub, Dallas; SxSW Music Conference, Austin, TX:  March 18, at 11PM, Hilton Garden Inn Creekside) and March 19 at 2PM, Continental Club, Austin, and 7PM, Hilton Hotel Austin; March 22-Hideaway on Dunvale, Houston, TX; 25-Café Congress, Tucson; 28-The Bamboozle Festival, Anaheim Stadium; April 28-Jammin' Java, Vienna, VA; and May 1-The Bamboozle Festival, Meadowlands, East Rutherford, NJ.

Dates supporting matt pond PA are:

May 5-Chameleon Club, Lancaster, PA; 6-Allen Street Stage, Penn State University, State College, PA; 7-Mac's Bar, Lansing, MI; 9-The House Café, DeKalb, IL; 10-Mad Planet, Milwaukee, WI; 11-Slowdown, Omaha; 12-Fox Theater, Boulder, CO; 14-Bottleneck, Lawrence, KS; 15-Mojo's, Columbia, MO; 17-Hi Tone Café, Memphis; 18-Square Room, Knoxville; 20-40 Watt, Athens, GA; 21-Village Tavern, Mt. Pleasant, SC; 22-Local 506, Chapel Hill, NC; 24-The Southern, Charlottesville, VA and 25-Otto Bar, Baltimore, MD.

Look for more U. S. dates to be announced soon.

Amelia’s Mechanics Tour Dates

Amelia's Mechanics hires Nashville-based drummer and percussionist Jamie Dick to perform with the band on select tour dates this spring. Dick has been performing live for over 15 years and most recently recorded with Rayna Gellert and Abigail Washburn on each of the artist's forthcoming albums.
Amelia's Mechanics is touring in support of their debut album "North, South" released earlier this year. The band's tour launches Thursday, March 11 in Raleigh, NC at the Pour House Music Hall and takes through North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia and is supported by the following radio stations: WDVX, WNCW, WUNC, WKNC, WUIN, WQFS, WXDU, WUSC, WUAG, WDWG, and WRMT.
Current 2010 Performance Schedule:
The Pour House Music Hall - March 11 - (Raleigh, NC)
The Whiskey - March 13 - (Wilmington, NC)
Home Team BBQ - March 18 - (Sullivan's Island, SC)
Coffee Underground - March 19 - (Greenville, SC)
White Mule Music Pub - March 20 (Columbia, SC)
The Basement - March 24 - (Nashville, TN)
MoDaddy's - March 25 - (Asheville, NC)
RA Fountain - March 26 - (Fountain, NC) 
Union Alley - March 27 - (Washington, NC)
The Broad Street Cafe - April 2 - (Durham, NC)
The Evening Muse - April 3 - (Charlotte, NC)
Acoustic Coffeehouse - April 8 - (Johnson City, TN)
The Canyons - April 9 - (Blowing Rock, NC)
Pisgah Brewing Co. - April 10 (Black Mountain, NC)
The Five Spot - April 22 - (Atlanta, GA)
Carrboro Arts Center - April 24 - (Chapel Hill, NC)
The Carolina Theater - April 25 - (Greensboro, NC)
Preservation Pub - April 28 - (Knoxville, TN)
The Garage - April 29 - (Winston-Salem, NC)
The Tipsy Teapot - April 30 - (Greenville, NC)
MerleFest - May 2 - (Wilkesboro, NC) - Molly McGinn PA
Purple Fiddle - May 5 - (Petersberg, WV)
Ashland Coffee and Tea House - May 6 - (Ashland, VA)
FemmeFest - May 22 - (Charlotte, NC)
Music in the Woods - May 29 - (Paris Mnt. State Park)
The Maguire Theater - June 3 - (Elizabeth, City, NC)
BRIEF BIOGRAPHY:
Amelia’s Mechanics is an all-female, Americana music trio whose instrumentation and vocal harmonies traverse classical, country, and jazz genres resulting in a sound best described as vintage country with a moonshine concerto. The band, whose name, debut album title, and lyrics are inspired by the accomplishments of early aviatrix and aviators, explorers and pioneers, writes and sings about the mechanics underlying life’s triumphs and tragedies. Amelia's Mechanics is Molly Miller (Lead Guitar and Vocals,) Kasey Horton (Viola,) Molly McGinn (Rhythm Guitar and Vocals,) and Jamie Dick (Drums and Percussion.)

2 Nights of EOTO at the Fox Theater

From dance halls to intimate theaters worldwide comes EOTO - the nation’s top innovator in glitchy electronic, bass thumping, dub-step themed music. With performances booked well into 2010 including a special two-night run at the Fox Theater, EOTO is taking the country by storm with their innovative brand of live electronic music.

What EOTO achieves on stage is nothing short of astounding. Performed with all of the bells and whistles of a traditional electronic artist plus the addition of live drums, vocals, bass and guitar, the duo creates each and every bass ridden noise right before your eyes -without the addition of a single pre-recorded track. Known for their 100% live improvised performance, EOTO is breaking ground into a new sub culture of music while standing with some of the nations best live DJ’s in the country.

With leagues of sold-out theater performances in 2009, the project started out as an avenue for the duo to blow off steam and generally just have a good time playing around with technology with music. Now, a full time project for the pair with a seemingly endless tour featuring over 600 shows in 4 years and sold out performances in every market in the country. With no signs of stopping, EOTO fine-tunes their approach and skill with each and every show they play, leaving the next performance more unique then the last.

The project will be careening the countryside in 2010 with back-to-back performances scheduled well into late spring and festival dates booked swiftly behind it. The project will be playing along the mountain west and up the west coast before heading back to middle America, through the South, and over to the East Coast in support of their third release, Fire The Lazers, which is now available on iTunes or at a show near you.

For more information about EOTO check out the MySpace

EOTO ON TOUR NOW:

March 4.....Crystal Bay Club - Crystal Bay, NV
March 5.....103 Harriet - San Francisco, CA
March 6.....Don Quixote's International Music Hall - Felton, CA
March 7.....Hopmonk - Sebastopol, CA
March 8.....Lost on Main - Chico, CA
March 9.....Red Fox Tavern - Eureka, CA
March 10.....Cultureworks - Ashland, OR
March 11.....The WOW Hall - Eugene, OR
March 12.....Berbati's Pan - Portland OR w/ Lynx & Janover, DJ James Ho
March 13.....Nectar Lounge - Seattle, WA
March 14.....The Night Light Lounge - Bellingham, WA
March 15.....The BLVD - Spokane, WA
March 16.....Taps @ Schweitzer Mountain Ski area - Sandpoint, ID
March 17.....The Palace - Missoula, MT
March 18.....The Fillin Station - Bozeman, MT
March 19.....The Limelight - Nashville, TN
March 20.....412 Market St - Chatanooga, TN
March 21.....The Boone Saloon - Boone, NC
March 22.....The Pour House Music Hall - Raleigh, NC
March 23.....The King Plow Art Center - Atlanta, GA
March 24.....The Cider House - Knoxville, TN
March 25.....New Earth Music Hall - Athens, GA
March 26.....Ultra Music Late night at Moksha Family (7th Circuit Studio) - Miami, FL
March 27.....The Hat Factory - Richmond, VA
March 28.....Awful Arthur's - Towers - Roanoke, VA
April 9......The Fox Theatre - Boulder, CO
April 10.....The Fox Theatre - Boulder, CO

Upcoming Beat Kaestli Spring Dates

Beat Kaestli is a vocalist, songwriter and producer residing in New York City. After establishing himself in the Swiss music scene, he moved to New York to broaden his musical horizon, leaving behind a promising career in his homeland. He was awarded a scholarship to the Manhattan School of Music (BM) and received the Ella Fitzgerald Foundation scholarship to graduate in 2008 with a Masters Degree from the Aaron Copland School of Music (MA). While honing his craft alongside noteworthy Jazz performers, such as Jane Monheit, Jason Moran and Stefon Harris, he immersed himself in Manhattan's fiercely competitive music scene, emerging as a seasoned performer. He now appears in clubs such as The Blue Note, Birdland, The Bitter End, The Jazz Standard, The Stone aCd Sweet Rhythm, performing with Jazz greats, like Esperanza Spalding, Jon Hendricks, Clarence Penn, Gregoire Maret, Joel Frahm , Billy Drummond, Magos Herrera and Victor Prieto. In 2005, Beat was the chosen vocalist for the Glenn Miller Orchestra, thrilling audiences in concert halls across the USA. Kaestli is touring the world extensively with his own projects, showcasing his music in renowned clubs and at festivals across the US, Europe, Mexico and Canada. His new CD "Far From Home - A Tribute to European Song" was released in fall 2009 in the USA and is scheduled to be released fall 2010 with NRW Records in Europe.

Tour Dates:

Brooklyn Public Library - "Brooklyn Sings - Brooklyn Swings":
Thursday, April 8th, 7PM

Central Library, Dweck Center
10 Grand Army Plaza
Brooklyn, NY 11238
t. 718-230-2100
FREE
Directions: 2,3.4 and 5 trains to Grand Army Plaza
featuring:
Beat Kaestli - voice
Zach Broch - violin

Ben Stivers - piano
Matt Wigton - bass
Fred Kennedy - drums

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Bar Next Door - Vocal Series:
Monday, April 19th, 8:30/10:30pm

129 MacDougal Street
New York, NY 10012
(212) 529-5945
$12 plus 1 drink min.
Directions: A, B, C, D, E and F trains to W4th street
featuring:
Beat Kaestli - voice
Guilherme Monteiro - guitar
Gary Wang - bass
special guest Sean Nowell - sax

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Upcoming shows in USA/Europe/Mexico:

Feb 26th - BAM Cafe, Brooklyn, NYC
March 5th - Jazz Club Bamberg, Germany
March 8th - RBB Radio "The Voice", Berlin, Germay http://www.kulturradio.de/frequenzen/index.html
March 8th - "Shared Night Vocal Duos", B-Flat, Berlin, Germany
March 9th - Kulturzentrum Reberhaus Keller, Bolligen, Switzerland
March 10th - Ludwigs w/Jan Eschke, Munich, Germany
March 11th - Cafe Lido w/ Christian Elsaesser, Munich Germany
March 19th - Jazzclub Uster, Switzerland
March 20th - Thalwil w/ Eliane Amherd, Switzerland
March 26th - JazzTone, Loerrach, Germany
March 31st - Bix Jazz Club, Stuttgart, Germany
April 8th - Brooklyn Library, NYC
April 19th - Bar Next Door, NYC
May 2nd - San Luis Festival, Mexico
May 16th - Talent and Voices at CENART, Mexico City
May 24th - Zinc Bar, NYC
Oct 2nd-5th - Generations Festival Frauenfeld, Switzerland
Oct 11th - "Shared Night" w/ Alexa Rodrian & Elisabeth Rodrian, B-Flat, Berlin (tbc)
Oct 13th - Le Pirate, Rosenheim, Germany
Oct 15th - Birdland, Ettlingen w/Elisabeth Lohninger, Germany

National Jazz Museum in Harlem Events, March, 2010

In March 2010, the National Jazz Museum in Harlem presents public programming that brings jazz fans closer to artists—emerging to living masters—that embody the art form that defines America to itself and to the world.

Our live performance series, Harlem in the Himalayas, features three forward-thinking musical leaders grounded in the lessons of their forebears, yet who are only bound by the limits of their imaginations. Come see the boundless future their music beholds at the Rubin Museum of Art.

Come engage in conversation with Terry Teachout, author of a celebrated new bio of Louis Armstrong, at Jazz for Curious Readers, and find out details on the controversial 2009 Wall Street Journal article in which he lamented the declining audience for jazz.


Harlem Speaks, our flagship series, features recent NEA Jazz Master awardee Kenny Barron and trombonist Dick Griffin, whose career encompasses all from mainstream jazz to the avant-garde.

Art Blakey, the drum master who led one of the premier jazz ensembles of the 20th century, is the sole focus of our month long Jazz for Curious Listeners (JCL) series and a special Saturday panel discussion. Museum co-director Christian McBride will lead two of the free JCL sessions, and will spearhead a tribute to Herbie Hancock at Stanford University in California as well.

Come to listen, learn, engage and swing!

Tuesday, March 2, 2010

Jazz for Curious Listeners The Big Beat: Art Blakey
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Art Blakey is undoubtedly one of the most influential and beloved percussionists and band leaders in the history of the music called jazz, his signature rolls and bandstand power accentuating the bandstands of countless groups as a sideman, and as leader of Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers.

The Jazz Messengers was a major incubator for young talent. A list of the band's alumni is a who's who of straight-ahead jazz from the '50s on – Lee Morgan, Wayne Shorter, Freddie Hubbard, Johnny Griffin, Jackie McLean, Donald Byrd, Bobby Timmons, Cedar Walton, Benny Golson, Joanne Brackeen, Billy Harper, Valery Ponomarev, Bill Pierce, Branford Marsalis, James Williams, and Chuck Mangione, to name only a few. In the '80s, precocious graduates of Blakey's School for Swing would continue to number among the movers and shakers in jazz, foremost among them trumpeter Wynton Marsalis, who became the most visible symbol of the '80s jazz mainstream; through him, Blakey's swingin’ ideals came to dominate the public's perception of the music. At the time of Blakey's death in 1990, the Messenger aesthetic dominated jazz, and Blakey himself had arguably become the most influential jazz musician of the past 20 years.

Monday, March 8, 2010

Jazz for Curious ReadersTerry Teachout
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Terry Teachout is a critic, biographer, blogger, and drama critic of The Wall Street Journal, the music critic of Commentary, and the author of Sightings, a column about the arts in America that appears biweekly in the Saturday Wall Street Journal.

And most significantly for tonight, Mr. Teachout is the author of the acclaimed new biography of the Father of Jazz: Pops: A Life of Louis Armstrong.

He blogs at About Last Night along with Chicago-based critic Laura Demanski (who writes under the name "Our Girl in Chicago"), contributes a weekly book-review column and a monthly videoblog to Contentions, the Commentary blog, and has written about the arts for many other magazines and newspapers, including the New York Times and National Review.

Teachout grew up in Sikeston, Missouri. He attended St. John's College in Annapolis, Maryland; William Jewell College in Liberty, Missouri, where he received his B.S. in music journalism; and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He lived in Kansas City from 1975 to 1983, working as a jazz bassist and a music critic for the Kansas City Star. He moved to New York City in 1985, working as an editor at Harper's Magazine (1985-87) and an editorial writer for the New York Daily News (1987-93) and as the News' classical music and dance critic (1993-2000). In 2004 he was appointed by President Bush to the National Council on the Arts, the advisory and review panel of the National Endowment for the Arts.

Teachout is the author of All in the Dances: A Brief Life of George Balanchine (2004, Harcourt), A Terry Teachout Reader (2004, Yale University Press), The Skeptic: A Life of H.L. Mencken (2002, HarperCollins), and City Limits: Memories of a Small-Town Boy (1991, Poseidon Press).

He is the editor of Beyond the Boom: New Voices on American Life, Culture, and Politics (1990, Poseidon, introduction by Tom Wolfe) and Ghosts on the Roof: Selected Journalism of Whittaker Chambers, 1931-1959 (1989, Regnery Gateway). In 1992 he rediscovered the manuscript of A Second Mencken Chrestomathy among H.L. Mencken's private papers and edited it for publication by Alfred A. Knopf (1995). He wrote the forewords to Paul Taylor's Private Domain: An Autobiography (1999, University of Pittsburgh Press), Elaine Dundy's The Dud Avocado (2007, New York Review Books), and William Bailey's William Bailey on Canvas (2007, Betty Cuningham Gallery) and contributed to The Oxford Companion to Jazz (2000, Oxford University Press). He has written liner notes for CDs by Karrin Allyson, Gene Bertoncini, Ruby Braff and Ellis Larkins, Chanticleer, Julia Dollison, Jim Ferguson, Diana Krall, the Lascivious Biddies, Joe Mooney, Marian McPartland, Mike Metheny, Maria Schneider, Nickel Creek, Kendra Shank, Luciana Souza, and the Trio Solisti.

Tuesday, March 9, 2010

Jazz for Curious Listeners The Big Beat: Art Blakey,
THE BANDLEADER
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Art Blakey's first musical education came in the form of piano lessons; he was playing professionally as a seventh grader, leading his own commercial band. He switched to drums shortly thereafter, learning to play in the hard-swinging style of Chick Webb and Sid Catlett. In 1942, he played with pianist Mary Lou Williams in New York. He toured the South with Fletcher Henderson's band in 1943-1944. From there, he briefly led a Boston-based big band before joining Billy Eckstine's new group, with which he would remain from 1944-1947. Eckstine's big band was the famous "cradle of modern jazz," and included (at different times) such major figures of the forthcoming bebop revolution as Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis, and Charlie Parker. When Eckstine's group disbanded, Blakey started a rehearsal ensemble called the Seventeen Messengers. He also recorded with an octet, the first of his bands to be called the Jazz Messengers.

Thursday, March 11, 2010

Harlem Speaks Kenny Barron, Pianist
6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

According to writer Arwulf Arwulf (from whom this bio is adapted), a thorough examination of Kenny Barron's musical accomplishments over a span of 50 years requires a discography of more than 200 pages. That's because in addition to a distinguished career as soloist and leader he has served as one of the most dependable sidemen in all of post-bop mainstream modern jazz. More than 40 albums have appeared under his name, and his presence on literally hundreds of recordings by other musicians paints a panoramic picture of Kenny Barron's lifelong devotion to the music.

Born in Philadelphia, PA, on June 9, 1943, he took on the piano at the age of 12, with a little help from Ray Bryant's sister, known today as the mother of guitarist Kevin Eubanks. Three years later, on the recommendation of his own big brother, saxophonist Bill Barron (1927-1989), he joined Mel Melvin's rhythm & blues band. The aspiring pianist gained more experience while working with drummer Philly Joe Jones, saxophonist Jimmy Heath and multi-instrumentalist Yusef Lateef in Detroit. Lateef's album The Centaur and the Phoenix (1960) was Kenny Barron's first modern jazz recording project, though not as a performer (Joe Zawinul was the pianist on this date) but as composer and arranger.

His recording debut as an improvising artist took place shortly after he moved to New York in 1961 and cut the first of many albums with his brother, who often aligned himself with two graduates of the Charles Mingus Jazz Workshop, trumpeter Ted Curson and saxophonist Booker Ervin. A session in 1962 found Barron working with trumpeter Dave Burns, one-time member of sax and flute man James Moody's exciting bop orchestra. Moody himself played an important role in Barron's career, first hiring him to perform at the Village Vanguard, then bringing him into Dizzy Gillespie's band. Barron stuck with Diz and Moody until 1966, performing at clubs and festivals on both coasts and touring through France and England.

Kenny Barron's first great year of independent recording activity was 1967. In addition to co-leading a band with trumpeter Jimmy Owens, the pianist made records with trumpeter Freddie Hubbard and saxophonists Joe Henderson, Stanley Turrentine, Booker Ervin, and Eric Kloss. Barron seldom recorded with anyone just once. Examples of artists who made many records with Barron during the 1970s are  Moody and Lateef, and bassists Ron Carter and Buster Williams, and others such as Marvin "Hannibal" Peterson. Barron also worked regularly with saxophonists Chico and Von Freeman, John Stubblefield, Nick Brignola, and Stan Getz (with whom he toured extensively during Getz's twilight years). The stylistic range continued to widen as Barron sat in with violinists Michal Urbaniak and John Blake, drummer Elvin Jones, and singing trombonist Ray Anderson.

During the '80s, Kenny Barron played piano in the score for Spike Lee's film Do the Right Thing, appeared on multi-performer tribute albums honoring composers Nino Rota and Thelonious Monk, and became a founding member (with Charlie Rouse, Buster Williams, and Ben Riley) of the definitive Monk legacy band, known as Sphere.

A respected educator who has taught at Rutgers, Juilliard, and the Manhattan School of Music, Kenny Barron continues to create music of exceptionally high quality and substantial depth, something he has done for half a century, whether using the Fender Rhodes electromechanical keyboard, a plugged-in harpsichord, a synthesizer, or his lifelong companion, that fundamental jazz instrument, the piano.

In January 2010 Barron was one of the esteemed recipients of the NEA Jazz Master’s honor, conferring an official recognition of what Barron’s fans have already known for 40 years. Come hear an musical master speak of his life and times in the art of jazz.

Friday, March 12, 2010

Harlem in the Himalayas Jaleel Shaw
7:00pm
Location: Rubin Museum of Art
(150 West 17th Street)
$18 in advance | $20 at door |
Box Office: 212-620-5000 ext. 344

Jaleel Shaw, alto saxophone
Dwayne Burno, acoustic bass
Otis Brown III, drums

One of the most thrilling young alto saxophonists on the jazz scene, Jaleel Shaw holds down the alto chair in the small ensemble of none other than the great Roy Haynes. Tonight see and hear him as he fronts his own band!

Jaleel Shaw grew up in Philadelphia, PA, where he studied with saxophone instructors Rayburn Wright and Robert Landham. As a teen, Jaleel performed, jammed and sat in at the many clubs in Philadelphia, honing his chops and developing strong relationships with the many great musicians there as well as the musicians that came to Philly from New York City.

Upon graduating from high school, Jaleel received a full tuition scholarship to the Berklee College of Music in Boston, Mass, where he attended for four years and earned a dual degree in Music Education and Performance (in 2000). While attending Berklee, Jaleel studied privately with saxophonists Andy Mcghee, Billy Pierce, George Garzone, and Shanon LeClaire.

After graduating from Berklee, Jaleel attended the Manhattan School of Music in New York City, where he received his Masters in Jazz Performance in May 2002. During his time at the MSM, Jaleel was recruited by both the Mingus Big Band and Count Basie Orchestra. Jaleel appears on two Grammy Nominated CDs by the Mingus Big Band - "Tonight at Noon" and "I Am Three."

A year after finishing his graduate studies, Jaleel joined Temple University as a part-time private lesson and ensemble instructor, and soon thereafter began giving private saxophone lessons at The New School.

After being in New York for five years, Jaleel's debut CD "Perspective" was released in June 2005 to rave reviews. It was named one of the top 5 debut CDs of 2005 by All About Jazz and the Jazz Journalists Association. In the fall of 2005, Jaleel joined world renown drummer Roy Haynes' Quartet and recorded the Grammy nominated CD "Whereas" with the group for the Dreyfus Label.

In the beginning of 2008, Jaleel launched his own record label (Changu Records), on which he released his second CD – "Optimism." Today Jaleel continues to perform primarily in three groups - The Roy Haynes Quartet, the Mingus Big Band, and his own quartet and quintet.

Saturday, March 13, 2010

Saturday Panels
Orgy in Rhythm: An In-Depth Look and Listen to Art Blakey
7:30 – 9:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers served as a traveling finishing school for countless jazz musicians who later led their own groups and became composers and arrangers of note. Today, meet some of the alumni of the Messengers, and see film footage of Blakey in action as a drummer, band leader, and teacher.

Tuesday, March 16, 2010
Jazz for Curious Listeners
The Big Beat: Art Blakey
ALUMNI REUNION 7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

With Christian McBride

Christian McBride, co-director of the National Jazz Museum in Harlem, will host alumni of the Blakey band in an evening not to be missed. The spirit of Blakey will be summoned!   

Friday, March 19, 2010

Harlem in the Himalayas
Ambrose Akinmusire
7:00pm
Location: Rubin Museum of Art
(150 West 17th Street)
$18 in advance | $20 at door |
Box Office: 212-620-5000 ext. 344

Ambrose’s conceptual extension into a new musical language never excludes beauty. As one who listens intently, he values the fertility of a pause, of communication, of tension. Ambrose began conceptualizing early as a musician, theorizing and experimenting as a catalyst for development. He seeks other genres of music to analyze and expose, drawing inspiration from musicians ranging from Bjork to Chopin.

Before he was eighteen, Ambrose had already performed with such famed musicians as Joe Henderson, Joshua Redman, Steve Coleman, and Billy Higgins. After graduating Berkeley High School, he moved to New York to begin a scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music, studying with Vincent Pinzerella from the New York Philharmonic, Dick Oatts, Lew Soloff, and Laurie Frink.

Ambrose is a recent graduate of the Masters program at USC, and also the Monk Institute, where Ambrose’s instructors included Terence Blanchard, Billy Childs and Gary Grant. In the past several years, he has worked with such artists as Jimmy Heath, Jason Moran, Hal Crook, Bob Hurst, Terri Lynne Carrington, Ron Carter, and Wallace Roney, Herbie Hancock and Wayne Shorter. So it should come as little or no surprise that Ambrose was the winner of both the 2007 Carmine Caruso International Jazz Trumpet Solo Competition and 2007 Thelonious Monk International Jazz Competition.

Tuesday, March 23, 2010

Jazz for Curious Listeners                               
The Big Beat: Art Blakey                                                                                 THE EARLY YEARS: with Fletcher Henderson, Thelonious Monk and Billy Eckstine

7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Art Blakey's first musical education came in the form of piano lessons; he was playing professionally as a seventh grader, leading his own commercial band. He switched to drums shortly thereafter, learning to play in the hard-swinging style of Chick Webb and Sid Catlett. In 1942, he played with pianist Mary Lou Williams in New York. He toured the South with Fletcher Henderson's band in 1943-1944. From there, he briefly led a Boston-based big band before joining Billy Eckstine's new group, with which he would remain from 1944-1947. Eckstine's big band was the famous "cradle of modern jazz," and included (at different times) such major figures of the forthcoming bebop revolution as Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis, and Charlie Parker. When Eckstine's group disbanded, Blakey started a rehearsal ensemble called the Seventeen Messengers. He also recorded with an octet, the first of his bands to be called the Jazz Messengers.

Thursday, March 25, 2010

Harlem Speaks
Dick Griffin, Trombonist
6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

In a career spanning over 30 years, Dick Griffin has performed with some of the biggest names in Jazz and Soul, and has appeared with several symphony orchestras as well. A short list of the luminaries Mr. Griffin has worked with includes: Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Ella Fitzgerald, Tito Puente, Art Blakey, Charles Mingus, Dizzy Gillespie, McCoy Tyner, Marvin Gaye, Michael Jackson, Isaac Hayes, Dionne Warwick, and Lionel Hampton.

Griffin has developed a highly personalized playing style which he calls "circularphonics," a technique that combines the playing of chords on trombone with circular breathing. The expanded range of sounds Griffin creates through his multiphonic technique at times evokes the spirit of such experimental artists as John Coltrane, Rahsaan Roland Kirk, and Sun Ra. Never a follower, however, Griffin has developed a unique style on and for the trombone that goes beyond the influence of even those great musicians.

James Richard Griffin was born and reared in Jackson, Mississippi. His first musical influence was a neighbor known simply as Mr. Jesse. At evening time, all the neighborhood children would stop by to hear Mr. Jesse's impromptu blues guitar compositions with lyrics describing the day's events in rhyme. Griffin began studying piano at age 11 and upon entering high school two years later joined the school's marching band where he learned trombone. His professional career began as a teenager, playing piano and trombone in clubs with drummer classmate Freddie Waits. While in high school he also sang in a doo-wop group which was invited to go on the road and perform with Sam Cooke. In junior college, Griffin won several awards for his arranging skills. In 1963, Griffin graduated from Jackson State University and then pursued graduate studies at Indiana University where he received a Masters Degree in Music Education and Trombone.

It was in Chicago, though, where Griffin met avant-garde jazz giant Sun Ra, that his professional career seriously took off. He spent several summers in the mid-1960s playing with Sun Ra's Arkestra. It was during this period that Griffin first met Rahsaan Roland Kirk, who became a close friend. After moving to New York City in 1967, Griffin made his recording debut with Kirk on the album "The Inflated Tear." As a member of the "Vibration Society," Griffin notated and transcribed music for the sightless Kirk. He went on to record several albums with Kirk, including "Prepare Thyself To Deal With A Miracle," "Rahsaan, Rahsaan," "Left & Right," and "Volunteered Slavery." In the early 1970s, Griffin also played in a big band fronted by the great bassist and composer Charles Mingus. During this year-long association, Mingus provided priceless support by encouraging the young trombonist's writing endeavors. Griffin also spent three years in the house band of the legendary Apollo Theater in Harlem, playing for nearly all the Motown greats, including The Temptations, James Brown and Nancy Wilson.

In 1974, Griffin released his debut album as a leader, "The Eighth Wonder," for Strata-East Records, one of the most successful independent jazz labels of that period. Later, he released "Now Is The Time: The Multiphonic Tribe" for Trident Records. During this period, he also taught music theory and the history of Jazz at Wesleyan University (1975-77) and later at SUNY-Old Westbury (1981-83). In the 1980s, Griffin's career encompassed performances in a wide variety of settings with his own group and with others. As a sideman, Griffin performed with some of the best big band musicians of the time—Benny Bailey, Jimmy Heath, Frank Foster, and Slide Hampton—at the 1980 Winter Olympics in Lake Placid, New York. Later in the decade, Griffin toured and recorded with the internationally-renowned ensemble "Ekaya," led by South African pianist Abdullah Ibrahim (f/k/a Dollar Brand).

As a composer, Griffin completed the "World Vibration Suite," a work for symphony orchestra premiered by the Brooklyn Philharmonic. In 1986, his third album "A Dream For Rahsaan," was released by Ruby Records to critical acclaim. This inspired him to adapt the album for a symphony orchestra and three saxophones, which was the format he had previously employed for the "World Vibration Suite." During the 1990s, he performed in over a dozen international Jazz festivals, both as a leader and in the bands of such diverse talents as Illinois Jacquet, Sun Ra, Charles Gayle, Hilton Ruiz, and Lionel Hampton. Along with such notable artists as Dizzy Gillespie and Sonny Rollins, Griffin appeared in the Heineken Jazz Festival in Rotterdam and, in 1991, he traveled to Canada to headline Ottawa's International Jazz Festival. The German label, Konnex Records, re-released Griffin's first and third albums in 1994 with additional tracks. Griffin then released "All Blues," his fourth album (on Amasaya Records), which features he novel lineup of trombone, organ, guitar, and drums. In addition to the title track by Miles Davis, Griffin performs five originals plus tunes by Ellington, Horace Silver, and Hampton Hawes, paying tribute to the blues environment in which he was nurtured.

One of the most versatile and inventive musicians of today, Griffin has played with symphony orchestras such as The Harlem Philharmonic and The Symphony Of The New World, and has performed in several Broadway shows including "The Wiz," "Me & Bessie," "Raisin," and "Lena" (starring Lena Horne), as well as in the Paris production of "Black & Blue" (starring Linda Hopkins). He has made many television appearances in the U.S. on shows such as "The Today Show", "Soul", "Faces", "The Ed Sullivan Show", and "Like It Is". He also has appeared in the UK on the BBC and on TV programs in Germany, France, and Italy. Finally, he also appeared in the film "The Cotton Club" and performed on the soundtrack for the movie "Gordon's War".

During the past few years, Griffin has performed more extensively with his own group, the Dick Griffin Organ Ensemble, and he also played at the Uncool Jazz Festival in Switzerland with Charles Gayle in 2001. Griffin has also continued to devote his time to his artwork. His abstract paintings and works on paper have been featured in numerous solo and group exhibitions, private and corporate collections in both the U.S. and Europe. Some of his early pieces grace the covers of each of his four CDs.

Tonight you can witness an artist not beholden to genre labels and engage in discussion with him during the audience Q&A portion of the evening.

Friday, March 26, 2010

Harlem in the Himalayas
Luis Bonilla
7:00pm
Location: Rubin Museum of Art
(150 West 17th Street)
$18 in advance | $20 at door |
Box Office: 212-620-5000 ext. 344

If ever an artist could be called an octopus, Luis Bonilla is it. The California raised, Costa Rican trombonist, composer and arranger has sought out, taken in and mastered an incredible array of musical styles. His success as a sideman with such greats as McCoy Tyner, Dizzy Gillespie, Lester Bowie, Tom Harrell, Freddie Hubbard, Astrud Gilberto, Willie Colon and Toshiko Akiyoshi attests not only to the skill and variety of Bonilla’s talent, but also to a mind restlessly committed to exploring some of the most complex and demanding music of our time.

Yet there is nothing rarefied about the Bonilla experience. He has worked as a studio musician with Tony Bennett, Marc Anthony, La India and Mary J. Blige and understands and exploits the liveliness of pop as well as the rhythmic sway and punch of Latin Jazz. Currently a member of the Vanguard Jazz Orchestra, the Afro-Latin Jazz Orchestra under Arturo O’Farrill’s direction  (both 2009 Grammy winners) and Dave Douglas’s latest group (Dave Douglas & Brass Ecstasy), Bonilla is one of those rare artists whose work is always expanding, taking in more and more while remaining singular and focused: “Bonilla may be a trombonist used to handling that big long sliding thing, but when it comes to execution of his ideas, he lets nothing slide” (All About Jazz).

Critics praised his first two albums on the Candid label, Pasos Gigantes (1998) and iEscucha! (2000), acknowledging Bonilla’s ability to give voice to radically different musical sensibilities with an ease and seamlessness that belies the rigor and sophistication of the music. Pasos Gigantes made Jazziz’s top ten Latin list of 1998. Even as early as these first two albums, critics noted Bonilla’s leadership and sophisticated use of tonal colors. As a faculty member at both Temple University and Manhattan School of Music, Bonilla has an intuitive sense in how to bring out the best in those working with him. Listen to any of his albums and you will hear an extraordinary level of trust and inspiration in each band member’s playing. As the critic for All About Jazz noticed, “Bonilla gives his colleagues ample space to breathe, adding momentum to the flow of his compositional ideas.”

His next album, 2007’s Terminal Clarity was a celebration, reflection and aesthetic extension of his years working with Lester Bowie. While retaining the brash harmonic structures of his mentor’s work from Brass Fantasy to his earlier and justly famous work with the Art Ensemble of Chicago, Bonilla adds a “contagious exuberance” (Jazzwise magazine) that is at the heart of his artistic vision. Without in any way diminishing Bowie’s audacity, Bonilla manages to balance “the cerebral and the down-and-dirty (Jazz Times), taking “bold steps to merge Latin genres, free jazz and a variety of other influences" (Latin Jazz Corner).

In Bonilla’s latest album, I Talking Now! (2009), he pushes these disjunctions even harder, politely demanding that we feel connections between wildly disparate styles of music. A heady mix of swing, rock, free jazz, funk, movie soundtracks, avant-garde noise and ballads, I Talking Now, for all its musical diversity, speaks with one voice. It is a distinctly American vision, a gentle craziness that suggests that every one and every sound can co-exist if we just keep on taking in more and more. Luis Bonilla is moving in directions that are expanding our notions of jazz and leading us into startling new realms with “remarkable creativity and versatility” (Newsday).

Tuesday, March 30, 2010
Christian McBride/Loren Schoenberg Duo/Informance
at Stanford University's Community School for Music and Arts, Mountain View

Tuesday, March 30, 2010 | 6:00 pm

Community School for Music and Arts, Mountain View

The annual duo concert/lecture by the NJMH’s dynamic directors!
ALSO – SAME NIGHT: Jazz for Curious Listeners
The Big Beat:
Art Blakey  FILM NIGHT

7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Don’t miss this free session with one of the world’s best bass instrumentalists sharing his views on, and selections by, Art Blakey, in this last of a month-long series of events focused on the man affectionately called “Buhaina.”

Wednesday, March 31, 2010

A TRIBUTE TO HERBIE HANCOCK: CHRISTIAN McBRIDE AND FRIENDS

Wednesday, March 31, 2010 | 8:00 pm
Stanford University's Dinkelspiel Auditorium

$34–38 (Adult) | $10 (Stanford Student)
$31–35 (Other Student)
$17–19 (Youth Under 18)
In a concert curated by the National Jazz Museum in Harlem (NJMH), museum co-director and bass phenom Christian McBride leads a tribute to the legacy of pioneering jazz composer/keyboardist Herbie Hancock. McBride has long embraced electric jazz, funk, and soul music as a vibrant part of the jazz mainstream. Here, he leads his versatile band through Hancock’s incredible body of work, from his years as a Miles Davis sideman and Blue Note Records solo artist in the 1960s, through his groundbreaking Headhunters fusion project in the ’70s, to his work with pop vocalists and producers in the ’80s and ’90s, and his current interest in young hip hop and techno artists. The concert is the culmination of a season of free public programs on jazz and technology, and a continuation of Lively Arts’ collaboration with NJMH and the Stanford Jazz Workshop, revisiting classic jazz repertoire from a fresh perspective.

***note: the JAZZ AT THE DWYER with Etienne Charles and his Trinidadian Jazz Band will occur on APRIL 23rd, not MARCH 23 as listed on our mailing card.

Prez Fest 2010 March 14, 2010 Celebrating Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers

During his life time, the legendary drummer Art Blakey performed at Saint Peter’s Church, ‘The Jazz Church,” many times. He was well known for his Jazz Messengers “school of jazz” which produced many legendary jazz musicians of today, including Wayne Shorter, Cedar Walton, Terrence Blanchard, Billy Harper, Brian Lynch, Donald Harrison, Reggie Workman, Bobby Watson and many others. All told there were 150 musicians who passed through his “school” over several decades.

For this festival, we are partnering with the National Jazz Museum in Harlem, 104 East 126th Street # 2C, New York City which is offering a series of events celebrating the legacy of Art Blakey including Jazz for Curious Listeners on Tuesdays in March from 7 to 8 PM and on Saturday, March 13 from Noon to 4 PM “An In-Depth Look and Listen to Art Blakey” panel.

Prez Fest 2010 Celebrating Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers – March 14, 2010 at Saint Peter’s Church, 619 Lexington Avenue at 54th Street, NY, NY.  Program begins at 3 PM and includes panel discussion, drum technique demonstration, jazz vespers and a concert.  $20 suggested ticket donation and $10 students donation with student ID.  http://www.saintpeters.org/ 212 935 2200. Take the “E” train to Lexington Avenue or the “6” to 51st Street. Press contacts: Ike Sturm, 212 935 2200 or Lynne Mueller 917 207 4953.

The Jazz Committee at Saint Peter’s Church / Midtown Arts Commons presents:

Prez Fest 2010 – March 14, 2010

Celebrating Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers

Saint Peter’s Church “The Jazz Church”

619 Lexington Avenue at 54th Street, New York City

Tickets Here