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National Jazz Museum September 2011 Schedule

For a combination of jazz dialogue, education, and live performance, look no further than the National Jazz Museum in September.

Our flagship conversation series, Harlem Speaks, first features soprano saxophonist Jane Ira Bloom in our first of several Harlem Speaks @ The New School events, which will occur in Greenwich Village (details below). Next, elder master Jimmy Heath will regale the live audience at our Visitor’s Center with tales from his illustrious history as a jazz artist.

Our Jazz for Curious Listeners series focuses on four classic recordings—Kind of Blue, Art Tatum: Solo Masterpieces, Red Clay, and Jazz at Massey Hall. The monthly Saturday panel peers into the legacy of jazz at Carnegie Hall.

We launch a new series this month, Tune Talk. We’ll find out where our favorite jazz songs come from and how they evolve into standards. This month’s featured song: “Body and Soul.”
Last but not least, our collaborative series with the Rubin Museum of Art—Harlem in the Himalayas—features alto saxophonist David Binney’s quartet and some special guests.
Mark your calendars, and bring some friends to share in pleasurable listening and learning!

Tuesday, September 6, 2011
Jazz for Curious Listeners
How to Listen to Jazz: “Kind of Blue”
7:00– 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center 
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C) 
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300
Whether you’re new to jazz, or a seasoned listener, you’ll appreciate this session on the best-selling jazz recording of all time. Recorded and released in 1959, leader Miles Davis’s Kind of Blue has stood the test of time as a jazz classic.

Why? Is it the fact that the ensemble played a “modal” approach instead of a string of chord changes as was prominent in the bebop style? Is it the fact that legendary artists participated: trumpeter Davis, tenor saxophonist John Coltrane, alto saxophonist Cannonball Adderley, pianists Bill Evans and Wynton Kelly, bassist Paul Chambers, and drummer Jimmy Cobb? Was it songs such as “So What,” “Freddie Freeloader,” and “All Blues”? All of the above?

Come discover the answers, as explained by Executive Director Loren Schoenberg.

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

Jazz for Curious Listeners
How to Listen to Jazz: “Art Tatum: Solo Masterpieces”
7:00– 8:30pm
Location: : NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Pianist Art Tatum’s prodigious technical facility was awe-inspiring. His inventiveness, harmonic acuity, and melodicism puts him at the top of the jazz piano mountain.

The recordings you’ll hear tonight are from the latter part of his life. Impresario Norman Granz produced these dates, which displays Tatum’s marvelous agility and artistry at a peak.

We invite you to an enlightening listening and learning session that will take you inside of the genius of one of the most startling artists of the 20th century.

Thursday, September 15, 2011

Harlem Speaks
Jane Ira Bloom
6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: The New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music
(55 West 13th St., Arnhold Hall, 5th floor )
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Soprano saxophonist/composer Jane Ira Bloom has been full-time faculty at the New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music since 1989, and holds degrees from Yale University and Yale School of Music. She is a pioneer in the use of live electronics and movement in jazz and winner of the Guggenheim Fellowship in music composition, the Mary Lou Williams Jazz Award for lifetime service to jazz, Downbeat International Critics Poll & Jazz Journalists Award for soprano saxophone, the IWJ Jazz Masters Award, and the Charlie Parker Fellowship for jazz innovation. Bloom also has an asteroid named in her honor by the International Astronomical Union (asteroid 6083janeirabloom).

She adjudicated the prestigious Thelonious Monk International Saxophone Competition, the BMI Jazz Workshop Composition Prize, and served on a distinguished panel of faculty composers at the new Jazz Composers Orchestra Institute at the Center for Jazz Studies at Columbia University.  Recipient of the Doris Duke Jazz New Works Award, and fellowships from the NEA, Rockefeller, Pew & Ford Foundations, she has performed, recorded, and/or collaborated with Charlie Haden, Ed Blackwell, Fred Hersch, George Coleman, Kenny Wheeler, Julian Priester, Rufus Reid, Bob Brookmeyer, Mark Dresser, Bobby Previte, Matt Wilson, Jerry Granelli, Marc Copland, Jay Clayton and Cleo Laine.

Her compositions and commissions include the American Composers Orchestra, St. Luke¹s Chamber Ensemble, Pilobolus & Paradigm Dance Companies, NY City Center's Fall for Dance Festival, and the NASA Art Program. She has also produced and recorded for CBS, ENJA, JMT, Arabesque Jazz Recordings and Artistshare.  Bloom has been presented in the most prestigious halls, clubs, and festivals around the world, and a new event in Brooklyn, NY featuring cutting edge woman artists was named in her honor (the 2009 Bloom Festival).

Friday, September 16, 2011
Harlem in the Himalayas
David Binney Quartet and Special Guests
7:00pm
Location: Rubin Museum of Art
(150 West 17th Street)
$18 in advance | $20 at door | 
For tickets: RMA Box Office or call 212-620-5000 ext. 344

David Binney, alto saxophone
Craig Taborn, piano
Elvind Opsvik, bass
Tyshawn Sorey, drums

Back after sold out shows in years past, acclaimed and highly individual saxophonist/composer David Binney is one of the most prolific jazz musicians on the scene today.  David's distinctive saxophone sound and innovative compositions have been heard from basement clubs in New York to jazz festivals in Europe.

In addition to David's extensive work as a leader, he has also been sought after as a sideman, appearing on recordings with Medeski, Martin & Wood and Uri Caine's Mahler Project. He has produced all of his own albums in addition to two Lost Tribe releases. David started his record label, Mythology Records, in 1998.

Saturday, September 17, 2011

Saturday Panel
Carnegie Hall Jazz
12:00– 4:00pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Starting with Benny Goodman’s historic 1938 concert, Carnegie Hall has hosted jazz concerts that gained classic status when they were issued on commercial recordings. Join us for an afternoon of superlative music courtesy of Miles Davis, Ella Fitzgerald, Duke Ellington, Count Basie and others.
Tuesday, September 20, 2011

Jazz for Curious Listeners
How to Listen to Jazz: Freddie Hubbard’s “Red Clay”
7:00– 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Trumpet icon Freddie Hubbard’s Red Clay marks a transitional moment in his career, in which he had been playing a form of straight-ahead jazz that some called “hard bop” on the Blue Note label. Red Clay incorporated electronic instrumentation (played on keyboard by Herbie Hancock, and bass by Ron Carter) and tapped into soul/funk styling. This was also the first recording on Creed Taylor’s CTI label, a forerunner of what came to be called “fusion jazz.”

Come to hear the various streams of style identified and made crystal clear, as this recording is placed within the historical context of Hubbard’s career as well as the stylistic direction of the music.

Wednesday, September 21, 2011

Tune Talk
“Body and Soul”
7:00pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

A key reason why“Body and Soul” is considered a classic is the very famous rendition by Coleman Hawkins in 1939. As a rite of passage, professional tenor saxophonists everywhere learned that solo. But is one famous version of a song enough to make it an enduring classic?

Or, in this case, do superlative versions by the Benny Goodman Trio, and Chu Berry and Roy Eldridge before Hawkins’, plus re-workings by John Coltrane, Dexter Gordon and others add to the aura of legend?

Tenor saxophonist and museum executive director Loren Schoenberg will go deep into the archives tonight, so join the journey!

Tuesday, September 27, 2011

Jazz for Curious Listeners
How to Listen to Jazz: Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie at Massey Hall
7:00– 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

In what turned out to be their last recording together, Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker performed in Canada at Massey Hall on May 15, 1953 in a show marketed as “the greatest jazz concert ever.” The two primary founders of the bebop movement were joined by drummer Max Roach, bassist Charles Mingus, and pianist Bud Powell.

This concert was indeed a great affair in which they performed songs by Gillespie (“Salt Peanuts,” “A Night In Tunisia”), Thelonious Monk (“52nd Street Theme”), Tadd Dameron (“Hot House”), Juan Tizol (“Perdido”), Jerome Kern (“All the Things You Are”), among others. Come feed your ears with the thrilling sounds and your minds with the keen analysis of Loren Schoenberg.

Thursday, September 29, 2011

Harlem Speaks
Jimmy Heath, saxophonist, composer and arranger
6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300
Long recognized as a brilliant instrumentalist, Heath is also a magnificent composer and arranger. He has performed with nearly all the jazz greats of the last 50 years, from Howard McGhee, Dizzy Gillespie, and Miles Davis to Wynton Marsalis. For the past 30 or so years, Heath performed regularly with his brothers, Percy and Albert, as the Heath Brothers, a band that often included contributions from his son Mtume, a noted percussionist, composer, and rhythm-and-blues producer.
During his career, Heath has performed on more than 100 albums. He has written more than 125 compositions, many of which have become jazz standards and have been recorded by artists such as Art Farmer, Cannonball Adderley, Clark Terry, Chet Baker, Miles Davis, James Moody, Milt Jackson, Ahmad Jamal, Ray Charles, Dizzy Gillespie, J.J. Johnson, and Dexter Gordon. Heath has also composed extended works, premiering his first symphonic work "Three Ears" in 1988 at Queens College (CUNY) with Maurice Peress conducting.
Heath retired from the Aaron Copland School of Music at Queens College in 1998, where he served as a Professor of Music for more than 11 years. Still, he maintains an extensive performance schedule and continues to conduct workshops and clinics throughout the United States, Europe, and Canada. He holds honorary degrees from Sojourner-Douglass College and the Juilliard School, and has a chair endowed in his name at Queens College. Currently, he serves on the board of the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz.
In January 2010, his long-awaited life story, I Walked With Giants, was published by Temple University Press.

Introducing Europe '72: Vol. 2

If you've been hoping for a more fiscally or physically manageable taste of the great tour of '72, look no further. Ready for release on September 20 is Europe '72: Vol. 2, a two-CD set featuring 20 newly mixed, never-before-released gems from that epic and historic adventure. As you probably know from all the Europe '72: The Complete Recordings hoopla, engineer Jeffrey Norman spent many months mixing down the 16-track master tapes from every show for the humongo-box, while mastering ace David Glasser put on the final polish and brought the sonics up to HDCD specs. You've probably heard various circulating soundboard tapes from these shows through the years, but trust us, you haven't heard the music sound quite like this before!

Grateful Dead vaultmeister and box producer David Lemieux was tasked with coming up with a two-disc compilation that would work as a worthy successor to the classic original album, a whopping 39 years later. And there was this guiding philosophy: There would be no songs that appeared on the original 3-LP set. Whoa! No "Truckin'"? "Morning Dew"? "China Cat"? Nope! But what's here is magnificent, including a spectacular, nearly hour-long combo of "Dark Star" > "The Other One" from the famous Bickershaw Festival in England (5/7/72); a kickin' version of "Not Fade Away" > "Goin' Down the Road" > "Not Fade Away" from the super-charged first night of the tour in London (4/7); and the always-moving "Sing Me Back Home" from the last night of the tour (5/26). There's also a wonderfully varied selection of other tunes from Copenhagen, Paris, Frankfurt and Luxembourg, including favorites such as "Bertha," "Playing in the Band," "Good Lovin'," "Black-Throated Wind," "Sugaree," "Deal" and many more.

Stanley Mouse who, along with his late partner Alton Kelley, created the memorable "Ice Cream Kid" and "Rainbow Foot" images for the original Europe '72 package, sweetens the deal with soon-to-be classic artwork featuring the return of the Kid! "Trouble comes in many flavors," Mouse cryptically commented recently. "Ice Cream Kid is in hot water. The jury is out. His only defense is love."

Elephant Revival & Steep Canyon Rangers at Boulder Theater

Z2 Entertainment is proud to present Elephant Revival and Steep Canyon Rangers at the Boulder Theater on Saturday, November 19th, 2011.  Tickets go on sale Friday, August 12th for $24.00 in advance and $27.00 day of show.

Elephant Revival

The neo-acoustic transcendental folk quintet from Nederland Colorado, is touring in support of their new album, ‘Break in the Clouds’ released on Ruff Shod Records, an independent label created by Chad Stokes of State Radio. The album was released regionally on Nov. 22nd 2010 with a full national release scheduled for June 14th 2011. ‘Break In the Clouds was produced by David Tiller of Taarka. Their sophomore effort expands upon the group’s multi–genre musical approach, threading together dynamic instrumentation and a diverse rhythmic sound while exploring the depths of all five of the groups’ gifted songwriters. The album debuted at #2 on the iTunes Singer-Songwriter chart, and was featured as a new and noteworthy independent release. “Break In the Clouds,” was also the top album sold in Colorado for four weeks in a row, and top radio spins for a Colorado artist in Colorado for the month of January 2011.

Steep Canyon Rangers

The past year has taken the Steep Canyon Rangers to new heights.  In March 2011, the band released its first collaborative record with Steve Martin, “Rare Bird Alert,” which debuted at #1 on Billboard’s Bluegrass Chart and at #43 on the Billboard Top 200.  In 2010, the latest solo record from Steep Canyon Rangers, “Deep In The Shade,” remained in the Bluegrass Top 10 on Billboard for 18 weeks.  While headlining festivals like MerleFest and Bonnaroo alongside Steve Martin with Steep Canyon Rangers include “Late Night with David Letterman,” “The Colbert Report” & “Austin City Limits.”

With smooth vocals, smart songwriting, ferocious instrumentals and jaw-dropping harmony, the Rangers are bringing Bluegrass to music lovers across the USA and around the world.  Steep Canyon Rangers are:  Mike Guggino (mandolin/vocals), Charles Humphrey III (bass/vocals), Woody Platt (guitar/lead vocals), Nicky Sanders (fiddle/vocals), and Graham Sharp (banjo/vocals)

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Elephant Revival & Steep Canyon Rangers

Boulder Theater

Saturday, November 19th, 2011

Doors: 8:00 pm

Show Time: 9:00 pm


Europe '72 | The Wait is Almost Over!

The production stage is coming to end for everyone working on the release...which means Europe '72: The Complete Recordings is about to truly begin for all of you! Dead.net is proud to announce the final disc tally is a whopping 73! Pressing is underway and they're on target to meet their expected ship date. As a special project-ending taste of the box set, they've got this tremendous version of "The Other One" from 4/11/72 in Newcastle, selected by David Lemieux. He considers this to be one of the finest, most dynamic, most powerful jams of the entire tour, high praise for a tour that included mind-blowing and mind-bending jams virtually every night of the tour.

Dead.net is now offering the All-The-Music edition of Europe '72, which includes all of the music recorded on the tour, with each show in its own individual package, complete with its own liner notes by Dead scholars such as David Gans, Blair Jackson, Steve Silberman, Gary Lambert and others, as well as by attendees of some of the shows. You'll get 72 CDs (our last count said over 60 but much to our surprise, the final count is 72) and 70 hours of prime Grateful Dead. You can purchase it now by clicking here.

Moody Bluegrass Two Featuring Vince Gill, Ricky Skaggs, Sam Bush & More Available Now

Following 2004’s critically and commercially acclaimed tribute to the legendary Moody Blues, the GRAMMY nominated Moody Bluegrass, along with the highly successful Moody Bluegrass Live, Nashville’s finest have come together again to honor the Moody Blues with Moody Bluegrass Two…Much Love released nationwide this week!

“We have had so many cover versions of our songs over the years, but none have stood out like Moody Bluegrass. Nashville's most outstanding musicians have once again brought a new dimension to our songs,“ said Ray Thomas, co-founder of the Moody Blues.

Producer David Harvey returns for this second volume, which perfectly blends the brilliant songwriting of the Moody Blues with the bluegrass sounds of mandolins, banjos and even clogging. The collection of bluegrass covers includes Moody Blues members Justin Hayward, John Lodge and Graeme Edge, as well as band co-founders Mike Pinder and Ray Thomas and a wide assortment of Music City’s finest including Vince Gill, Ricky SkaggsSam Bush and more.

The record spans the entire Moody Blues catalogue, and includes fan favorites such as "Tuesday Afternoon" and "I Know You're Out There." Moody Bluegrass Two translates the Moody Blues’ original songs seamlessly and much like the first bluegrass tribute, the beauty of the original Moody Blues music shines.

Moody Bluegrass Two also features the talents of Tim O'Brien, Harley Allen, Peter Rowan, Jan Harvey, Ronnie Bowman, Emma Harvey, Larry Cordle, John Cowan, Jon Randall, David Harvey, Tim May, Andy Hall and Andy Todd.

For more information visit www.moodybluegrass.com.

Rebirth Brass Band at Fox Theatre | 07.22.11

Z2 Entertainment is proud to present Rebirth Brass Band at the Fox Theatre on Friday, July 22nd. Tickets go on sale Friday, June 17th at 10:00am.

Hailed by the New York Times as “a New Orleans institution,” the Rebirth Brass Band have been at the forefront of the brass band revival that they helped kick off almost 30 years ago. Formed by the Frazier brothers, Phil and Keith, along with Basin Street labelmate Kermit Ruffins in 1983, The Rebirth Brass band has gone from playing on corners in the French Quarter to selling out concert halls across the world and appearing in David Simon’s HBO hit “Tremé.”

It’s been a long road, but The Rebirth Brass Band has become one of the most beloved brass bands in New Orleans and around the world.

Since their founding, they’ve developed a signature brand of heavy funk that they expand upon on their latest effort, Rebirth of New Orleans. Opener “Exactly Like You” starts the album off with a rollicking, Mardi Gras stomp. “The Dilemma” and “Do It Again” find the group locking in to a down-tempo, Latin-influenced grooves, anchored by Phil Frazier’s tuba. And “Shrimp and Gumbo” and Feelin’ Fine” find the band effortlessly perfecting the New Orleans-style brass lines that put the city on the map.

Rebirth Brass Band were featured in the opening scene of David Simon’s hit HBO show “Tremé” as well as on the GRAMMY® nominated soundtrack. No band exemplifies the essence and soul of New Orleans like Rebirth Brass Band.

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Rebirth Brass Band

Fox Theatre

Friday, July 22nd

Doors:  8:30 pm

Show Time:  9:00 pm

Vince Gill, Sam Bush, Ricky Skaggs and More Join Moody Bluegrass Two

Following 2004’s critically and commercially acclaimed tribute to the legendary Moody Blues, the GRAMMY nominated Moody Bluegrass, along with the highly successful Moody Bluegrass Live, Nashville’s finest have come together again to honor the Moody Blues with Moody Bluegrass Two…Much Love available nationwide on June 21, 2011.

“We have had so many cover versions of our songs over the years, but none have stood out like Moody Bluegrass. Nashville's most outstanding musicians have once again brought a new dimension to our songs, “ said Ray Thomas, co-founder of the Moody Blues.

Producer David Harvey returns for this second volume, which perfectly blends the brilliant songwriting of the Moody Blues with the bluegrass sounds of mandolins, banjos and even clogging. The collection of bluegrass covers includes Moody Blues members Justin Hayward, John Lodge and Graeme Edge, as well as band co-founders Mike Pinder and Ray Thomas and a wide assortment of Music City’s finest including Vince Gill, Sam Bush and Ricky Skaggs.

The record spans the entire Moody Blues catalogue, and includes fan favorites such as "Tuesday Afternoon" and "I Know You're Out There." Moody Bluegrass Two translates the Moody Blues’ original songs seamlessly and much like the first bluegrass tribute, the beauty of the original Moody Blues music shines.

Moody Bluegrass Two also features the talents of Tim O'Brien, Harley Allen, Peter Rowan, Jan Harvey, Ronnie Bowman, Emma Harvey, Larry Cordle, John Cowan, Jon Randall, David Harvey, Tim May, Andy Hall and Andy Todd.

For more information visit www.moodybluegrass.com.

Legendary Pianist Steve Kuhn at the Triad - NYC

This Friday, May 27th, New York's acclaimed Triad Theatre on the upper west side presents a special jazz concert, featuring a solo performance by pianist Steve Kuhn and a performance by Saxophonist Daniel Bennett and his band.  Steve Kuhn will perform selections from his critically acclaimed album, "Mostly Coltrane" on the ECM label.  The Daniel Bennett Group will perform selections from their newest album, "Peace and Stability Among Bears."  Advance discounted tickets are available for purchase at www.brownpapertickets.com/event/171424.  Tickets are available at the door for $25.  The concert starts at 9:30pm and is an all-ages event. The Triad is located on the upper west side, at 158 West 72nd Street.

Legendary pianist Steve Kuhn has established himself as one of the preeminent voices in the jazz world. Kuhn began his illustrious career performing as a sideman with the likes of Stan Getz, John Coltrane, and Art Farmer.  At the end of the 1960's he spent four years living in Europe. Upon returning to the United States, Kuhn began his long-term affiliation with the revolutionary record label ECM.  This resulted in a string of important albums including Trance, Ecstasy, Non-Fiction,and important collaborations with Sheila Jordan.  In the mid-80's, Kuhn co-founded the popular 'All Star Trio', with bassist Ron Carter and drummer Al Foster. Kuhn also launched a revolving edition of his trio with bassist David Finck and various drummers, like Joey Baron, Lewis Nash, Billy Drummond, Kenny Washington and Bill Stewart. Steve Kuhn has released over 20 critically acclaimed albums on the Blue Note, Concord, and ECM labels. Kuhn continues to tour extensively throughout the world, with a strong following in the United States, Europe and Japan.

Critically acclaimed New York saxophonist Daniel Bennett has recently shared concert stages with artists like Bill Frisell, Charlie Hunter, James Carter, Billy Martin (Medeski, Martin & Wood), Jerry Bergonzi, and David Fiuczynski.  The Boston Herald described Daniel Bennett’s music as, “exploratory folk-jazz.” Bennett’s musical journey began as a graduate student at the prestigious New England Conservatory in Boston, Massachusetts.  During this time, Bennett began to compose songs that featured folk melodies played on the saxophone in a jazz quartet format.  Bennett's chord progressions also maintained a unique minimalist quality, influenced by composers like Steve Reich and Philip Glass. The Boston Phoenix described Bennett's style as, "an unusual folk-minimalist approach."  The music was innovative, yet remarkably accessible to a broad spectrum of listeners. The Boston Globe described Bennett’s music as “a mix of jazz, folk, and trance.”  The Daniel Bennett Group has released four albums on the Bennett Alliance label, A Nation of Bears, The Legend of Bear Thompson, Live at the Theatre, and Peace and Stability Among Bears.  Daniel Bennett’s "Folk Jazz" music has found a broad fan base that is unusual for a modern jazz outfit. Insite Magazine called Daniel Bennett’s music, “refreshingly capricious and trippy."

The world-renowned Triad Theatre has hosted performances by entertainers like Slash, Joan Osborne, Lisa Loeb, Paula Cole, Susan Lucci, Buddy Miles, Ravi Coltrane, Debbie Gibson, David Crosby, George Benson, Max Weinberg, John Entwistle, Tracey Morgan, Kathie Lee Gifford, Matthew Broderick, Rachel Dratch, and Steve Gutenberg. The Triad was the original home for Off-Broadway hits like "Forever Plaid," "Forbidden Broadway," and "Secrets Every Smart Traveler Should Know."

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Friday, May 27th

Triad Theatre

158 West 72nd St, New York, NY

Purchase Tickets HERE!

Phish Live in Utica Out Now!

The Phish Utica box set features the complete October 20, 2010 performance on 2-DVD’s and 2-CD’s to be released nationwide on May 24th.  The box set presents three hours of crucial Phish in an intimate venue with an inspired audience that returned the energy at every turn.

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Here's a little video snippet from the DVD release.

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The Utica box set features the complete October 20, 2010 performance on 2-DVDs and 2-CDs. The nearly three hours of music on the Utica box set was recorded with 64 channels of digital multi-track and mixed and mastered, appearing on the DVD's in 5.1 Dolby surround and full-resolution, uncompressed PCM stereo. The video was shot with 8 cameras (16:9 widescreen), recorded and post-edited in High Definition. Regions 1-6.

If you order "Live In Utica" from Phish Dry Goods, you'll receive "Phish: I-90s", a free bonus CD compilation featuring archival material from as early as nineteen years before the "Live In Utica" DVD release. This collection follows the band along the I-90 New York Thruway as they honed their skills in drummer Jon Fishman's home state, recalling highlights from some of the region's many great Phish shows in the 90s. Recorded by Paul Languedoc, compiled by Kevin Shapiro and mastered by Fred Kevorkian, this bonus CD will be included in all Phish Dry Goods orders of Live In Utica while supplies last.

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PHISH - Live In Utica 2010 Tracklisting
DVD Disc One

1. My Soul
2. Stealing Time From The Faulty Plan
3. Vultures
4. Wolfman's Brother
5. Cities >
6. Guyute
7. David Bowie
8. Wilson >
9. McGrupp And The Watchful Hosemasters >
10. Saw It Again >
11. Run Like An Antelope

DVD Disc Two
1. Drowned >
2. Sand >
3. Theme From The Bottom >
4. Axilla >
5. Birds Of A Feather
6. Tela >
7. Split Open And Melt >
8. Have Mercy >
9. Piper >
11. Split Open And Melt >
12. Slave To The Traffic Light
Encore:
13. Good Times, Bad Times

CD Disc One
1. Vultures
2. Wolfman's Brother
3. Cities >
4. Guyute
5. David Bowie
6. Wilson >
7. McGrupp And The Watchful Hosemasters >
8. Saw It Again >
9. Run Like An Antelope

CD Disc Two
1. Drowned >
2. Sand >
3. Theme From The Bottom >
4. Axilla >
5. Birds Of A Feather
6. Split Open And Melt >
7. Have Mercy >
8. Piper >
9. Split Open And Melt >
10. Slave To The Traffic Light

David Bromberg's USE ME Tapes Friends

When David Bromberg, one of America’s finest roots musicians, emerged from a recording hiatus of 17 years with the solo, acoustic, traditional folk-blues album Try Me One More Time (Appleseed, 2007), fans and critics were thrilled, and the CD was rewarded with a Grammy nomination. For his follow-up album, Use Me, Bromberg chose a different approach: Why not ask some of his favorite singer-songwriters and musicians to write (or choose), produce, and perform on songs tailored to his versatile but distinctive skills as a guitarist and vocalist?

Answering David’s call were well-known artists from the many genres comprising the amorphous “Americana” musical category. Representing contemporary rootsy singer-songwriters: John Hiatt, the first musician Bromberg approached, who penned the pensive “Ride On Out a Ways” for him; for New Orleans “fonk,” Dr. John; there’s three-guitar jam band interplay with Widespread Panic and jug band music with Levon Helm (the sprightly “Bring It With You When You Come,” produced by Grammy-winning Larry Campbell). Linda Ronstadt puts in a rare appearance on a soulful Brook Benton ballad, Los Lobos contribute a Mexican-flavored waltz, Vince Gill and Tim O’Brien take care of the country and bluegrass quotient, Keb’ Mo’ brings the blues, and the hitmaking Butcher Brothers, producers Phil and Joe Nicolo (Bob Dylan, John Lennon, Cypress Hill, Nine Inch Nails), provide the languid R&B groove for the title song, a cover of Bill Withers’ classic “Use Me.”

The resultant album is due for July 12, 2011 release on Appleseed Records. A national tour will ensue.
Standout tracks change with each listening, but some of the high points include the crisp blues shuffle “Tongue,” the album’s lone Bromberg original, with Levon Helm on drums; “You Don’t Wanna Make Me Mad,” featuring David on slide guitar and Dr. John on piano; the ominous slow blues “Diggin’ in the Deep Blue Sea,” updated by Keb’ Mo’ and Gary Nicholson from Larry Davis’ “Texas Flood” to address the dangers of offshore drilling, and the chipper Vince Gill — Guy Clark co-write “Lookout Mountain Girl,” the only song on which David cedes most of the lead guitar duties (to Vince, although David splits the lead with Widespread Panic’s Jimmy Herring on “Old Neighborhood”).
Rather than collating individual instrumental parts literally phoned in to a central location, the recording sessions for Use Me generally took place on each guest artist’s home turf — in Woodstock (Levon Helm), New Orleans (Dr. John), Nashville (John Hiatt, Tim O’Brien, Vince Gill), Los Angeles (Los Lobos), and so on, to retain their regional flavors. For Bromberg, who started his professional career as an accompanist for everyone from Dion and Jay and the Americans to Bob Dylan and Willie Nelson, the sessions were simultaneously a throwback to his sideman days and a sidestep from his own recordings. “As artist and producer, I get to completely mold my vision of how the song should go,” he explains. “The drawback is that I don’t get many ideas that are not my own. It was fascinating for me to see the different approaches that everyone used in production.”
No matter who the producers, songwriters or accompanying musicians are on Use Me, Bromberg’s expressive guitar-playing and “rippling Fred Neil-like baritone that . . . brings warm, reassuring comfort” (Rolling Stone) remain the centerpiece of the CD, diamonds in golden settings.
Born in Philadelphia in 1945 and raised in Tarrytown, NY, “I listened to rock ’n’ roll and whatever else was on the radio,” says Bromberg. “I discovered Pete Seeger and The Weavers and, through them, Reverend Gary Davis. I then discovered Big Bill Broonzy, who led me to Muddy Waters and the Chicago blues. This was more or less the same time I discovered Flatt and Scruggs, which led to Bill Monroe and Doc Watson.”
Bromberg began studying guitar when he was 13 and eventually enrolled in Columbia University as a musicology major. The call of the Greenwich Village folk scene in the mid-’60s drew David to the downtown clubs and coffeehouses, where he could watch and learn from the best performers, including primary sources such as his inspiration and teacher, the Reverend Gary Davis.
Bromberg’s sensitive, blues-based approach to guitar-playing earned him jobs playing the Village “basket houses” for tips, the occasional paying gig, and lots of employment as a backing musician for Tom Paxton, Jerry Jeff Walker and Rosalie Sorrels, among others. He became a first-call, “hired gun” guitarist for recording sessions, playing on hundreds of records by artists including Bob Dylan (New Morning, Self Portrait, Dylan), Link Wray, The Eagles, Ringo Starr, Willie Nelson and Carly Simon. In the early ’90s, David produced an as-yet-unreleased Dylan album, although two tracks have been issued as part of Dylan’s “Bootleg Series.”
An unexpected and wildly successful solo spot at the 1970 Isle of Wight Festival in Great Britain led to a solo deal with Columbia Records, for whom David recorded four albums. His eponymous 1971 debut included the mock-anguished “Suffer To Sing the Blues,” a Bromberg original that became an FM radio staple, and “The Holdup,” a songwriting collaboration with former Beatle George Harrison on which Harrison also played slide guitar. David, who had met the Grateful Dead’s Jerry Garcia at the Woodstock Festival when they both took refuge from the rain in a tepee, wound up with four Dead members, including Garcia, playing on his next two albums.
Bromberg’s range of material, based in the folk and blues idioms, continually expanded with each new album to encompass bluegrass, ragtime, country and ethnic music, and his touring band grew apace. By the mid-’70s, the David Bromberg Big Band included horn-players, a fiddler, and several multi-instrumentalists, including David himself. Among the best-known Bromberg Band graduates: mandolinist Andy Statman, later a major figure in the Klezmer music movement in America, and fiddler Jay Ungar (who wrote the memorable “Ashokan Farewell” for Ken Burns’ PBS documentary, “The Civil War”).
Despite jubilant, loose-limbed concerts and a string of acclaimed albums on the Fantasy label, Bromberg found himself exhausted by the logistics of the music business. “I decided to change the direction of my life,” he explains. So David dissolved his band in 1980, and he and his artist/musician wife, Nancy Josephson, moved from Northern California to Chicago, where David attended the Kenneth Warren School of Violin Making. Though he still toured periodically, the recordings slowed to a trickle and then stopped.
After “too many Chicago winters,” in 2002 David and Nancy moved to Wilmington, Del., where they currently serve as unofficial “artists in residence” and where David established David Bromberg Fine Violins, a retail store and repair shop for high quality instruments. Frequent participation in the city’s weekly jam sessions helped rekindle Bromberg’s desire to perform music “live” again, and the encouragement of fellow musicians Chris Hillman (The Byrds, Desert Rose Band, Flying Burrito Brothers) and bluegrass wizard Herb Pedersen helped nudge him back into the recording studio. The Wilmington jams also led to the formation of Angel Band, fronted by Nancy and two other female vocalists, with David frequently serving as an accompanist.
Bromberg’s participation in his local and musical community has subsequently included a fund-raising music festival (Bromberg’s Big Noise in the Neighborhood) to help renovate a local theater, and a keynote address at this past spring’s Folk Alliance International convention, a non-profit organization of musicians, concert presenters and industry professionals.
David continues his musical revitalization with projects like Use Me, playing solo shows or backed by his own bluegrass quartet and reunions of the David Bromberg Big Band. Use your ears and catch him when you can!