wildlife

Help protect Arctic wildlife

The Western Arctic Reserve may be less well-known than the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, but its wildlife populations are every bit as unique, spectacular and endangered.

Please take a minute to ask the Obama Administration to grant the strongest possible protection to the Western Arctic Reserve.

Nearly a century ago, the Western Arctic Reserve was set aside as a “National Petroleum Reserve”, but it remains one of our continent’s last, largely untouched tracts of wilderness and wildlife habitat.

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is developing a new area-wide plan for the Reserve, providing an ideal opportunity to safeguard its greatest natural treasures -- so-called “Special Areas” -- from destructive oil and gas development.

These Special Areas -- some established at the direction of Congress in the late 1970’s and others proposed by conservationists -- include the Colville River, Teshekpuk Lake, Utukok Uplands, Kasegaluk Lagoon, Dease Inlet, Peard Bay, Ikpikpuk River and the DeLong Mountains and Foothills Special Areas.

The vast network of coastal lagoons, deep lakes, sedge grass meadows and streams that make up the prized Teshekpuk Lake region provide the critical calving grounds for one of the largest caribou herds in Alaska, as well as summer habitat for polar bears. A staggering variety of birds also take refuge in these wetlands, some migrating from as far south as Antarctica.

Along the northwestern coast of the Western Arctic Reserve, up to 3,500 beluga whales gather in the Kasegaluk Lagoon every year to feed and bear their young.

The vast wilderness of the Reserve supports more than just Arctic wildlife. Inupiat Eskimos have subsisted here for thousands of years by following the caribou herds.

Many of these areas have not yet been disturbed, and this may be our last best chance to preserve them for the future. Please tell the BLM that it’s time to grant the Western Arctic Reserve the protection it deserves.

Thank you for taking action to protect our last Arctic wildlands and wildlife.

Help block drilling in a Colorado wildlife refuge

- for the Grateful Web

The Bush administration is poised to allow two giant energy companies to drill exploratory oil and gas wells up to 14,000 feet beneath Colorado's spectacular Baca National Wildlife Refuge.

Last year, BioGems Defenders and other NRDC online activists sent more than 48,000 messages protesting this destructive drilling scheme. Despite this outcry, the Bush administration is moving forward with the plan, which could pave the way for massive industrialization of the Baca Refuge. 

Please go to http://www.savebiogems.org/yellowstone/takeaction and tell the Bush administration to halt the Baca oil and gas project until a thorough study of its potentially devastating environmental impacts is carried out.

The Baca refuge is an important calving ground for deer and elk and provides a natural sanctuary for imperiled wildlife,
including the ferruginous hawk, the threatened burrowing owl, the greater and lesser sandhill crane and the Rio Grande sucker, an endangered fish. Over 4,000 elk depend on the area for critical winter habitat and calving grounds to shelter newborns.

Thousands of migrating birds visit the refuge each spring and fall, and hundreds of ancient Native American artifacts lie
buried under ancient layers of sand. World-class archeological sites dating back some 11,500 years have been found nearby.

The proposed drilling project threatens to transform this irreplaceable wildland into an industrial zone - contaminating
air, land and waterways and unleashing a barrage of drilling-related traffic and noise. Even the adjacent Great Sand
Dunes National Park could be at risk. 

Energy companies currently own the rights to oil and gas reserves beneath the refuge. But the Bush administration has the authority to block reckless and destructive industrialization on these lands.

Please go to http://www.savebiogems.org/yellowstone/takeaction and demand that the Bush administration protect the Baca
National Wildlife Refuge from the far-reaching impacts of oil and gas drilling.

Thank you for helping to protect our last remaining Rocky Mountain wildlife habitats.

Help block drilling in Colorado wildlife refuge

- for the Grateful Web

Two giant energy companies are pushing to drill exploratory oil and gas wells up to 14,000 feet beneath Colorado's spectacular Baca National Wildlife Refuge.

Two giant energy companies are pushing to drill exploratory oil and gas wells up to 14,000 feet beneath Colorado's spectacular Baca National Wildlife Refuge.

We need your immediate action to block this destructive drilling scheme, which could pave the way for massive industrialization of this natural treasure.

Please go to http://www.savebiogems.org/yellowstone/takeaction and urge the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to halt the Baca oil and gas project until a thorough study of its potentially devastating environmental impacts is carried out.

The Baca refuge is an important calving ground for deer and elk and provides a natural sanctuary to threatened or endangered wildlife, including the bald eagle, greater sandhill crane and mountain plover. World-class archeological sites dating back some 11,500 years have been found nearby.

The proposed drilling project threatens to transform this irreplaceable wildland into an industrial zone of drill pads and roads - contaminating air, land and waterways and unleashing a barrage of drilling-related traffic and noise. Even the adjacent Great Sand Dunes National Park could be at risk.

Energy companies currently own the rights to any oil and gas reserves beneath the refuge. But the Bush administration has the authority to block reckless and destructive industrialization on these lands.

Please go to http://www.savebiogems.org/yellowstone/takeaction and demand that the Fish and Wildlife Service protect the Baca National Wildlife Refuge from the far-reaching impacts of oil and gas drilling.

Thank you for helping to protect our last remaining Rocky Mountain wildlife habitats.