start

Ben Sollee's 'Close To You' Video Debut

Today, USA Today Pop Candy debuted the video for "Close To You" - a new track from cellist Ben Sollee's upcoming May 10th release, "Inclusions".

Ben's music incorporates a melting-pot of genres combined with storytelling lyricism.

You Ain't No Picasso recently posted that Ben is "at the start of something great" and I wholeheartedly agree.

Click here to check out the debut of Ben Sollee's of "Close To You."

Ice Cube @ The Boulder Theatre | 2/26/11

As his popularity continues to grow through movies and television, Ice Cube remains committed to the foundation of his career: Hip-Hop music. Quick to emphasize that he is and always will be a B-Boy, dedicated to writing vivid rhymes, delivering stellar stage performances and making dope hip-hop records. I Am The West is poised to be another high point in that mission. Very few can make as bold a statement as I Am The West and even fewer can dispute Ice Cube's right to stake the claim. His hall of fame resume alone would be enough to own the title, but this album is an opportunity to raise the bar even higher.

The hallmark of Ice Cube's best known work is ever present on I Am The West: Lyrics from a realistic perspective, giving voice to those usually ignored or shunned by the power base, rhymes that make you think and songs that set the party off. All supported with outstanding production that makes your head nod. And Ice Cube accomplishes this while thoroughly representing his unwavering commitment to the west coast hip-hop movement that he helped to start over twenty years ago. I Am The West is a celebration of summertime on the west coast. So it's only right to introduce the album with the first single "I Rep That West." A song on which Ice Cube makes it very clear where he stands in hip-hop. An up tempo record, that's hard enough for the hard core, "I Rep That West" boasts an infectious hook that knows no geographic or demographic boundaries, saturating everyone from the club and radio DJ to those of us singing along in the car. "I Rep That west" is one of several songs on the album that will gain the attention of music fans around the globe. And maybe that's why Ice Cube says he's "too west coast for the west coast."

More Info / Buy Tickets

Punch Brothers @ The Boulder Theatre | 2/11/11

"Antifogmatic" is a bit of bygone slang that mandolinist Chris Thile and his bandmates stumbled across, an old term, explains the Punch Brothers founder, for a bracing beverage, rum or whiskey, that one would have in the morning before going out to work in rough weather, to stave off any ill effects." It's an apt title for the Punch Brothers' second Nonesuch disc. This ten-song set of collectively written material takes a clear-eyed view of those things less tangible than booze that can make us woozy: the pleasures and pitfalls of romance, the seemingly limitless possibilities and multifarious temptations of life in the big city.

The arrangements on Antifogmatic range from intimate to boisterous and back; genre-wise, the band once again ventures where no string band has ever gone before. The spare opening track "You Are" contrasts percussive guitar riffs with lyrical string parts that dance around Thile's sweet upper register as he spins a tale of romantic emancipation; occasionally, the other instruments give way to reveal the throb of the bass. The band also engages in some unexpectedly beautiful harmony singing, smoothing out the compelling melodic twists and turns of Welcome Home." "Me and Us" and "Woman and the Bell" both have a dream-like quality; the former, in fact, was inspired by those jumbled, thought-filled moments before sleep sets in, and the instrumentation keeps pace with the ever-shifting imagery. In contrast, "Don't Need No" and "Rye Whiskey" are foot-stomping barroom boasts and "Next to the Trash" is the closest the band gets to traditional bluegrass, even as the lyrics tug the piece in a more surreal direction.

"Our new record is a very pure collaboration," Thile emphasizes. "I would often come to the boys with a start, a little nugget, and we would collectively fashion it into something. None of these songs would have been like themselves if I had been left to my own devices. Several of them were starts that other guys had, and we would build from there. It's fun how liquid the writing process was on this."

The stories the Punch Brothers tell in Antifogmatic-partly autobiographical, partly imagine-were shaped by after-hours camaraderie as much as musical collaboration; they're ultimately about drinking everything in as well as drinking what's in front of them up, though there was plenty of that too. Concludes Thile, "The boys and I would work all day in one of our apartments and then we'd want to go out and have a drink. That's what you do in New York City, because everyone's apartment is too small to hang out comfortably in. We're a group of five guys. If friends start attaching themselves to the fray after that, you forsake the one-bedroom apartment and you go into the incredibly vibrant bar scene that isn't merely an encouragement for intoxication and spending obscene amounts of money per drink. It's really a wonderful way to get to know your fellow man, with your top button unbuttoned and your tie loosened a little bit."

More Info / Buy Tickets