mines

Colorado School of Mines Faculty Senate Endorses Amendment 58

Colorado School of Mines- for the Grateful Web

The Faculty Senate of the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) has passed a resolution endorsing Amendment 58, which proposes to create the Colorado Promise Scholarship by eliminating a tax credit for oil and gas companies. The initiative would double the amount of need-based scholarships available to resident students attending public institutions of higher education if approved by Colorado voters in November.

The resolution, proposed by J. Thomas McKinnon, professor of chemical engineering and president of the CSM Faculty Senate, notes the scholarship program would help maintain the affordability of college by offering more aid to lower and middle income families in the state. Roughly two-thirds of Colorado families could qualify opening the doors of college opportunity to many new students. "During my 18 years on the faculty, I've seen a number of heroic students working nearly full-time jobs while trying to study engineering; some have succeeded but many have not," McKinnon said. "By providing better financial aid, we can help students concentrate on their studies and become more productive members of society. A well educated work force is clearly a prudent long-term strategy for ensuring the health of our economy."

By creating the Colorado Promise Scholarship Fund, Amendment 58 will more than double the state's financial aid funding. The scholarships would follow a "shared responsibility" model, taking into consideration how much a family is expected to pay for college, how much the student can contribute, and what is available from Pell and other federal grants.

The measure proposes to repeal a tax credit enacted in the late 1970s to help the energy industry become established in Colorado. The credit allows energy companies to subtract 87.5 percent of their property tax bills from the severance taxes they owe on oil and gas extracted in the state. The credit currently amounts to roughly $300 million a year. According to the Consumer Federation of America, Colorado produced $6.63 billion worth of oil and gas last year, or about 6.2 percent of total U.S. production.

It is estimated the Amendment 58 would raise $250-$325 million a year, with 60 percent going to the Colorado Promise Scholarship Fund. Of the remaining funds,10 percent would be funneled to renewable energy projects, 15 percent to wildlife habitat, and 15 percent to water quality and transportation projects in communities where oil and gas producers operate.

The Faculty Senate at CSM joins a long list of Amendment 58 supporters,  including the Colorado Commission on Higher Education, the presidents of the University of Colorado, University of Northern Colorado, Colorado State University system, Western State College, Metro State College, and the Colorado Community College System, the Associated Students of Colorado, Adams State Board of Trustees, Mesa State College Board of Trustees, Metropolitan State College of Denver Board of Trustees, the University of Northern Colorado Trustees, the Natural Resources Defense Council, Trout Unlimited, the National Wildlife Federation, and the Colorado Renewable Energy Society.

The CSM Faculty Senate represents the academic faculty at CSM and not the institution as a whole.

Eddie Floyd Mines R&B Roots on New Album of Southern Soul

Eddie Floyd- for the Grateful Web

Soul man Eddie Floyd's first new album in six years, titled Eddie Loves You So, marks his return to the Stax Records logo. The singer who scored a monster soul classic with "Knock on Wood" in 1967 has returned to his Southern roots for the new CD. Included are 10 original songs written for fellow soul artists in the '50s and '60s. Some date back to Floyd's years with the seminal proto-soul group The Falcons; others are some previously unheard gems. The new CD hits the streets on July 29, 2008 on Stax Records through the Concord Music Group.
 
Eddie Loves You So was produced by the Boston team of Michael Dinallo (known for his work with the Radio Kings and Barrence Whitfield) and Ducky Carlisle (who's worked with Susan Tedeschi, Buddy Guy and Graham Parker).
 
The album, while newly recorded, takes the listener back to the R&B origins of the Montgomery, Ala.-born Floyd. He was a member of The Falcons in the late '50s, which also featured Joe Stubbs, later of the Contours and 100 Proof Aged in Soul. From that era, Floyd has re-recorded "You're So Fine," the group's breakthrough 1959 hit, plus "Never Get Enough of Your Love," which he recorded on Al Bell's Safice Records between his Falcons and Stax years. There's also a previously unreleased Falcons song, "Since You've Been Gone," which was demoed but never recorded until now.
 
The album contains songs that Floyd wrote for other Stax artists but never recorded himself: "'Til My Back Ain't Got No Bone," a hit for William Bell and later cut by Esther Phillips; "I Will Always Have Faith In You," a #11 hit for Carla Thomas; and "You Don't Know What You Mean To Me," a co-write with Steve Cropper that label mates Sam & Dave who took to #20 on the R&B chart. All have been recorded by Floyd for the album, as was "I Don't Want to Be With Nobody But You," a Floyd song that Malaco artist Dorothy Moore recorded on her 1976 Misty Blue album.
 
The new album also contains "Consider Me," a classic Stax Eddie Floyd ballad that was an album track but never a single, plus two newer compositions: "Close to You" and "Head to Toe."

"Working with Eddie and getting to know him by making this record has been a complete joy," says co-producer Dinallo. "Eddie's energy and enthusiasm has been and continues to be incredibly inspiring. Ducky and I were floored when he started singing. The sound of his voice coming back over the speakers gave us chills and made us howl with delight. In choosing the songs for this record, it hit me that I was surveying the history of soul music by digging through Eddie's catalog of the past 50 years. With current neo-soul movement, it is only appropriate that one of the genre's most important and influential songwriter and performer steps to the front with this record."