culture

TUPAC AMARU SHAKUR FOUNDATION ANNOUNCES “2PAC 40TH BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION”

Afeni Shakur and the Tupac Amaru Shakur Foundation announce details for the 2PAC 40th Birthday Celebration Concert, at the Atlanta Symphony Hall in Atlanta, GA, June 16, 2011. Hosted by comedian/actor Mike Epps, this star-studded event will feature a headlining appearance by GRAMMY® award-winning artist Erykah Badu, as well as performances by legendary soul artists Roy Ayers and Eric Roberson, and hip-hop heavyweights Too $hort, Bun B, and 8 Ball and MJG. Proceeds from the event benefit the Tupac Amaru Shakur Foundation.

“I am deeply honored to have been invited by Afeni Shakur to celebrate her son’s remarkable life,” says Badu. “I don’t take this distinction for granted.”

Since 2009, presenters, Mike Epps and Afeni Shakur have drawn thousands of 2Pac fans from around the globe to Atlanta for an annual day of music, art and culture in recognition of the icon’s lasting impact and influence. The event aims to not only revive Tupac’s spirit through art, but offer a prophetic representation of the late artist at age 40 – complete  with a musical soundtrack that spans the soulful jazz sounds of Roy Ayers and to West Coast rap contemporaries such as Too $hort.

“With this event, we help keep Tupac’s legacy alive,” says Epps, “not only by bringing together the fans that know and love his music, but also by supporting his organization, and the causes he worked so hard for during his lifetime.”

Past celebrations have included performances by Rick Ross, Wacka Flocka, Lil’ Scrappy, M1 of Dead Prez and more. At last year’s concert, Dekalb County officials presented Afeni Shakur and Mike Epps with a proclamation officially naming June 16th as “Tupac Day.”

This June 16 will mark the 40th birthday of Tupac Shakur, a man whose impact on culture worldwide through his art, activism and passion is felt to this day. This year, fans, family, artists and performers alike will gather at the Atlanta Symphony Hall to both celebrate the life and further the cause of this remarkable individual.

Tickets are priced at $45-150.00, and are available exclusively at www.16thofjune.com.

DOUG BENSON at the Boulder Theater

Square Peg is proud to present Doug Benson – Baked On Stage Tour at the Boulder Theater on Tuesday, September 20, 2011.

American stand-up comedian Doug Benson's biggest passions are movies and marijuana, and a great deal of comedy is based on each of them -- from his film, Super High Me to his regular "I Love Movies" podcast. A regular contributor to VH1 series like Best Week Ever (where he plays the "Pop Culture Bachelor"), Benson's humor is rooted in deadpan absurdity. His silliness sometimes masks deconstructionist intelligence in his act, meaning his comedy is often way smarter than you might initially realize. Also, he's hilarious.

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DOUG BENSON

Baked On Stage Tour!

Tickets On Sale This Friday, 05.13 at 4:20 PM!!

www.bouldertheater.com - 303.786.7030

Poly Styrene 1957-2011

We can confirm that the beautiful Poly Styrene, who has been a true fighter,  won her battle on Monday evening (4/25/11)  to go to higher places. Poly Styrene was born Marianne Elliot Said on June 3, 1957. She passed away due to cancer.

Poly Styrene was a punk amongst punks. A groundbreaking presence that left an unrepeatable mark on the musical landscape, she made history the moment she uttered, “Some people think little girls should be seen and not heard but I think oh bondage up yours!” The influence of Poly and X-ray Spex has been felt far and wide ever since. The seminal album Germ Free Adolescents is a landmark work and a primary influence on Britpop and Riot Grrrl. At the center of it was Poly Styrene, a bi-racial feminist punk with the perfect voice to soundtrack rebellion. Poly never sacrificed the intelligence or the fun in her music and style. Her trademark braces and dayglo clothes were a playful rejection of the status quo and of conformity and complacency. She dissected gender politics, consumer culture, and the obsessions of modern life in a way that made us all want sing along with her.

At the core of Poly’s work from Germ Free Adolescents through Generation Indigo, is a revolutionary with a genuine love for this world and the people and things in it. Her indomitable heart is all over the new material from her championing of cruelty free products and as she put it, "being conscious of the slaughterhouse culture" (“I Luv Ur Sneakers”) to giving voice to marginalized poor people worldwide (“No Rockefeller”) to tackling racism (“Colour Blind”). Poly Styrene never stopped exciting us with her incisive world-view, amazing wit, and her adventurous sound. It is impossible to imagine what modern music would be like without her incalculable contributions but it’s probably not worth imagining a world that never had Poly Styrene in it.

A thrilling work from a true pioneer and rebel in every sense, Poly Styrene’s album Generation Indigo is out today through Future Noise Music and was produced by Youth (The Verve, Killing Joke, The Fireman, Edwyn Collins).The album’s fusion of punk spirit, and fresh sounds has already received rave reviews on both sides of the Atlantic from Spin, NPR, NME, MOJO and countless others. The forward looking Generation Indigo showcases Poly’s humorous musings on pop culture, the internet and fashion whilst also tackling heavier subject matter (war and racism) with her politically aware and intelligent lyrics all in the inimitable voice of a genuine icon. Listen to the full Generation Indigo record streaming on AOL Spinner.

Sharon Van Etten Announces Spring Headlining Tour

Sharon Van Etten wrapped up 2010 with a bow by appearing on more best-of and year-end lists than we could count, including those from SPIN, NPR’s All Song’s Considered, LA Times, Filter, Stereogum, Chicago Tribune, Washington Post, and so many more. And while the world was singing her praises, Sharon was just starting to record more intimately heart-wrenching songs in the Brooklyn garage-turned-studio of The National’s Aaron Dessner.

After touring relentlessly in the 2nd half of 2010, and ending the year on such a strong note, you’d think Sharon would give herself a little break, but nope, not our Sharon. She’s just keeping at it! She’s just confirmed her first headlining tour, playing select dates across the country in March and April, including SXSW, and she’s beginning the year straight off the bat with a sold-out hometown show at the Bowery Ballroom. After a few shows in the U.S. this month, she’ll travel to Europe and tour with The National, come home and give herself a nice week off, and then hit the road again! This week also finds Sharon as the iTunes Discovery Download. Do yourself a favor in 2011 and make plans now to check out a singer-songwriter who The Wall Street Journal has called “a major talent in bloom”…

Listen to Sharon Van Etten’s “Don’t Do It”: here | Check out two SVE tracks on NPR’s World Café: here

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SHARON VAN ETTEN TOUR DATES:

Sat          01/08/11     New York, NY - Bowery Ballroom  #
Wed        01/19/11     New Haven, CT - BAR
Thu        01/20/11      Philadelphia, PA - Johnny Brenda's  %
Fri          01/21/11      Columbus, OH - Wexner Center at Ohio State  %
Sat          01/22/11     Nashville, TN - The 5 Spot  %
Sun         01/23/11     Asheville, NC - Broadways  %
Sun        02/13/11       London, England @ Hoxton Square Bar and Kitchen
Tues       02/15/11      Belgium, Brussels - Forest National w/The National
Thu        02/17/11      Utrecht @ Netherlands Cross-Linx Fest
Fri          02/18/11     Eindhoven @ Netherlands Cross-Linx Fest
Sat         02/19/11      Groningen, @ Netherlands Cross-Linx Fest
Sun        02/20/11      Rotterdam, @ Netherlands Cross-Linx Fest
Tues       02/22/11     Poland, Krakow – Studio w/The National
Thu        02/24/11     Poland, Warsaw – Stodola w/The National
Fri          02/25/11     Germany, Berlin - C-Halle w/The National
Sat         02/26/11     Denmark, Aarhus – SCC w/The National
Mon       02/28/11     Sweden, Lund - Färs & Frosta w/The National
Tues       03/01/11     Sweden, Stockholm – Cirkus w/The National
Thu        03/03/11     Finland, Helsinki - The House of Culture w/The National
Fri          03/04/11     Finland, Helsinki - The House of Culture w/The National
Thu        03/10/11     Baltimore, MD - Metro Gallery
Fri          03/11/11     Raleigh, NC - Kings Barcade
Sat         03/12/11     Atlanta, GA - 529
Thu        03/17/11     Austin, TX - SXSW
Fri         03/18/11     Austin, TX - SXSW
Sat         03/19/11     Austin, TX - SXSW
Tue         03/22/11     Tucson, AZ - Solar Culture ^
Wed       03/23/11     Phoenix, AZ - Rhythm Room ^
Thu        03/24/11     San Diego, CA - Soda Bar ^
Fri         03/25/11      Los Angeles, CA - The Satellite ^
Sat         03/26/11      Costa Mesa, CA - Detroit Bar ^
Sun        03/27/11     San Francisco, CA - Bottom of the Hill ^
Tue         03/29/11    Vancouver, BC - Media Club ^
Wed       03/30/11      Portland, OR - Doug Fir ^
Fri         04/01/11      Boise, ID - Neurolux ^
Sat         04/02/11     Salt Lake City, UT - State Room ^
Sun        04/03/11     Denver, CO - Walnut Room ^
Mon       04/04/11     Omaha, NE - Slowdown ^
Wed       04/06/11     Minneapolis, MN - Cedar Cultural Center ^
Thu        04/07/11     Milwaukee, WI - Pabst Theater ^
Fri         04/08/11      Madison, WI - University of Wisconsin ^
Sat         04/09/11     Chicago, IL - Lincoln Hall ^
Sun        04/10/11     Cleveland, OH - Beachland Tavern ^
Tue        04/12/11      Toronto, ON - Drake Hotel ^
Wed       04/13/11     Montreal, QC - Casa Del Popolo  ^
Thu        04/14/11     Boston, MA - Brighton Music Hall ^
Sun        04/17/11     Washington, DC - Red Palace ^

#   with War On Drugs, Sebastian Blanck
%  with Julianna Barwick
^  Little Scream

Ladysmith Black Mambazo Keep the Music of their Childhood Alive

The centuries-old story of their country and culture has been the foundation of the a cappella singing group Ladysmith Black Mambazo since its beginnings, almost fifty years ago. On 'Songs From A Zulu Farm,' out January 25, 2011 (Listen 2 Entertainment Group), the nine-man group returns to their origins in the open fields of Zulu country to recreate the idyllic world in which they once lived by singing traditional folk tunes sung by mothers and fathers to children throughout the generations.

"These are songs from the earliest time in our lives," says Ladysmith Black Mambazo founder and frontman Joseph Shabalala. "When we sing these songs, we're singing from our personal history. It is such a joy for us to put these stories and songs together for our fans to enjoy too."

'Songs From A Zulu Farm' speaks to the universal joys of childhood. "Whether you are in Ladysmith, Virginia, or Ladysmith, South Africa, children are hearing songs they will carry with them for the rest of their lives and share with their own children," Shabalala says. "We hope that these songs sung to South African children can be enjoyed by families in many other places in the world."

Among the 16 tracks on 'Songs From A Zulu Farm' is "Old McDonald… Zulu Style," the classic children's song reworked in ways never before imagined as it's piped through the language and culture of the Zulu people.

Listen to "Old MacDonald" here.

Shabalala professes his love and longing for the times and places of his youth in “Thalaza,” a song he composed to encourage Zulus – and people of every nation and culture – to reconnect to the innocence of their younger years. “Your roots are who you are,” says Shabalala, who revisits the farmland of his youth every month. “I go home to see the sights I’ve known since I was a baby. When I see a field there, I see my father and mother standing with me as a little boy. I love going home because it is just that…home.”

Check out some Grateful Web coverage of Ladysmith Black Mambazo.

UK's Everything Everything On UK Tour Now / Look Out For US Fall Tour

Imagine a band who fuse three part harmonies with scalding post-punk guitars; floor-filling bass lines with syncopated rhythms and lyrics about everything from high-school massacres to R&B lotharios musing on their lot in a post-apocalyptic wilderness.

Not easy, is it? But then Everything Everything aren’t here to make life easy. They’re here to challenge every knee-jerk convention of indie rock and dance on the grave of pointless retrogression.

Chances are you’ve come across EE before. Chances are they perplexed, intrigued and if you’ve an ear for something special, they excited you. They first accosted our senses with ‘Suffragette Suffragette’ in Dec 08, followed by ‘Photoshop Handsome’ in May and third single ‘MY KZ, UR BF’ in Oct 09.

Having whipped up interest in all quarters via these low key releases (they’ve acquired fans ranging from Zane Lowe to 6Music’s Marc Riley, played two UK tours- including an advance sold out ICA show as an unsigned band, notched up a top spot on MTV2’s My Space Chart and been tipped by the likes of NME and Times Culture), they signed to Geffen Records in late 2009.

Schoolin is the first single to be taken from their recently completed, David Kosten co-produced debut album (title tbc) due for release in August. It seems set to be the breakthrough debut album of 2010.

After a hugely successful NME tour and supports slots with Delphic, the band are now poised for their biggest festival season yet, showcasing their amazing live set throughout Europe and Japan. EE are so far confirmed to play Reading & Leeds, Glastonbury, Latitude (headlining the Lake Stage) and Bestival.

National Jazz Museum in Harlem 2010 May Schedule

We invite you to join us at the National Jazz Museum in Harlem as we venture to the very birthplace of jazz, New Orleans, for a month-long focus on the Crescent City of today.

We take our Jazz for Curious Listeners theme, “Tuning into Tremé,” as an allusion to the critically acclaimed new HBO series, which itself is named after one of the oldest black neighborhoods in the United States. Curated by Larry Blumenfeld of the Wall Street Journal, this journey will encompass the gumbo of cultures and musics that make New Orleans so special while pointing the way to its post-Katrina future. The Saturday Panel on New Orleans will extend and elaborate this critical inquiry.

Our flagship discussion series, Harlem Speaks, begins with Harlem resident and master tenor saxophonist Wayne Escoffery, and ends with the veteran vibraphonist David Samuels, whose eclectic musical tastes will add spice to the conversation. Trumpet man Randy Sandke’s latest book is making waves in as a fresh and at times controversial look at race and economics in jazz history; he’ll share the whys and hows at Jazz for Curious Readers.

As always, we never just give you all talk and no play, so the instrumentalists will have their say on stage, as pianist Steven Schoenberg performs a solo concert for Harlem in the Himalayas and the NJMH All Stars blow their horns for dancers at Jazz at the Dwyer.

Mark your calendars today, tell some friends, don’t delay, so we can swing with you in May!

Monday, May 3, 2010

Jazz for Curious Readers
Randy Sandke
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Trumpeter/author Randy Sandke, author of Where the Light and the Dark Folks Meet: Race and the Mythology, Politics and Business of Jazz (Scarecrow Press, 2010), has performed at festivals, clubs, and concerts around the world and has recorded over twenty albums as a leader as well.

As a composer, Sandke has had pieces performed at Carnegie Hall, the 92nd St. YMCA, and Avery Fischer Hall at Lincoln Center. The Carnegie Hall Jazz Band performed six of his suites.

Tonight’s focus, however, is on Sandke’s literary achievement and insights.

Randy Sandke’s previous book, Harmony for a New Millennium, details a method of exploring non-tonal harmony in the context of both composition and improvisation. He has also written scholarly articles on jazz history for the Oxford Companion to Jazz and the Rutgers University Annual Review of Jazz Studies.

In his recently published work (see above) Sandke conjoins his experience as a working musician with his scholarship to produce a work that debunks many of the hoary myths surrounding the role of race in jazz history. In what promises to be an intriguing (and perhaps controversial) discussion, Sandke will explain his thesis and why he was inspired to write Where the Light and the Dark Folks Meet: Race and the Mythology, Politics and Business of Jazz.

Tuesday, May 4, 2010

Jazz for Curious Listeners
Tuning in to Tremé: Big Chiefs and Second Lines
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Set in New Orleans, David Simon's new HBO series “Treme” picks up three months after the floods that resulted from the levee failures after Hurricane Katrina. Culture, which in New Orleans means a tight braid of music, cuisine, dance, visual art, and street life, is the primary focus of the series, as indeed it was and is the defining element of the city's identity and its recovery. Familiar faces from Simon's actors' troupe show up as fictional cultural fixtures: Wendell Pierce (detective Bunk Moreland on The Wire) plays Antoine Batiste, a trombonist we first encounter subbing with the real-life Rebirth Brass Band. Clarke Peters (detective Lester Freamon on The Wire) plays the Mardi Gras Indian Chief Albert Lambreaux, chanting out some of his best lines while beating a tambourine. The true-life heroes of New Orleans jazz figure prominently too: In addition to Rebirth, the list of musicians making cameo appearances, often in performance, includes trumpeter Kermit Ruffins, saxophonist Donald Harrison, and Troy “Trombone Shorty” Andrews, and drummer Bob French.

These 90-minute conversations, led by writer Larry Blumenfeld, who has written extensively about New Orleans since the flood, will use the HBO series to frame a wide-ranging consideration of jazz culture in New Orleans and its role in recovery. Excerpts from the show will be screened, and special guests-musicians, participants in the series, and scholars-will join in the discussion.

In Sidney Bechet's memoir, Treat It Gentle, the late, great clarinetist's real grandfather is supplanted by Omar, a fictional figure based on a folk tale, all the better to convey stirring truths about the true origins of New Orleans jazz. Real and imagined intermingle pointedly in New Orleans, in all walks of life. What can the fiction of “Treme”-which is named for the “Tremé neighborhood in New Orleans, long a hothouse for jazz culture-tell is about the city's real culture before and since the flood?

In our first session we will see the manner in which “Treme” plugs directly into an indigenous culture that has served as a lifeline for a New Orleans still inching toward recovery. That lifeline is extended principally by traditional jazz and brass-band musicians; the Social Aid & Pleasure Club members that mount Sunday parades; and-perhaps the most mysterious and essential group of all-Mardi Gras Indians, who dress in elaborate feathered and beaded suits four times a year. We'll consider the roots, traditions and depictions of these culture-bearers and their connections to familiar music.

Thursday, May 6, 2010

Harlem Speaks
Wayne Escoffery, Saxophonist
6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Harlem resident Wayne Escoffery is one of the most talented rising stars and in-demand sidemen on tenor saxophone in jazz. Born in London, Escoffery grew up in New Haven, Connecticut, where he sang in a renowned local boy’s choir and began taking sax lessons. At 16 he attended JazzMobile in Harlem, and by his senior year in secondary school had met Jackie McLean at The Artist’s Collective in Hartford.
McLean gave Wayne a full scholarship to attend The Hartt School, where he graduated summa cum laude with a Bachelor's degree in Jazz Performance, and became known as one of McLean's prize pupils. He went on to attend and graduate from The Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz Performance at The New England Conservatory in Boston with a Masters degree.

Since then, he has performed with a plethora of internationally respected musicians and has become known for his beautiful sound, impressive technique and versatility. As well as performing with his quartet, his group Veneration and a collaborative group with vocalist (and wife) Carolyn Leonhart, Wayne Escoffery currently performs locally and tours internationally with Ben Riley's Monk Legacy Septet, The Tom Harrell Quintet, and The Mingus Big Band/Orchestra/Dynasty.

Friday, May 7, 2010

Harlem in the Himalayas

Steven Schoenberg
7:00pm
Location: Rubin Museum of Art
(150 West 17th Street)
$18 in advance | $20 at door |
For tickets: RMA Box Office
or call 212-620-5000 ext. 344

This solo piano performance marks Steven Schoenberg's first New York concert since the release of Steven Schoenberg Live: An Improvisational Journey. He’s a dynamic, award-winning composer/pianist whose talents cross into musical theater, classical compositions, film scoring, children's music, and solo improvisational piano performances. Schoenberg’s creativity as an improviser and composer shall be on full display as he spontaneously riffs on the Himalayan themes of the venue as well as the vibrations he picks up from the audience . . . so be a part of the experience!

Tuesday, May 11, 2010

Jazz for Curious Listeners
Tuning in to Tremé: Hymns, Dirges and Misdemeanors
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

We continue tracking the acclaimed HBO series, noting that New Orleans jazz has always drawn upon and served both the secular and the sacred, and has been an important element of community organization. Yet, in the wake of Katrina, the often-strained relationship between the musicians and the police, the city and its culture, were starkly revealed: A city known for its culture did not so warmly welcome that culture back. Curator Larry Blumenfeld invites you to join the examination of this tension, and its portrayal in the series.

Saturday, May 15, 2010

Saturday Panels
New Orleans
12:00 – 4:00pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Live music plus film and discussion about the Crescent City
New Orleans holds a special place in the history and mythos of the U.S.A. Its mix of southern, French, Spanish and African cultures, and a largely Catholic religious background—in a nation predominately Protestant—was a uniquely rich soil for the birth and early development of jazz. Today’s discussion will feature live music, film, recordings, and a lively discussion of the Crescent City from the 19th to the 21st centuries, when a post-Katrina New Orleans struggles to recover while maintaining its soul, style and dignity.

Tuesday, May 18, 2010

Jazz for Curious Listeners
Tuning in to Tremé: A Rhythm-and-Blues Intervention
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Following the current HBO series, we note that perhaps more so than in any other American city, New Orleans represents the blending of African rhythms and forms with European harmonies and musical sensibility to transform our ideas about music and seed ongoing innovation. Looking at that lineage-from Congo Square to Louis Armstrong, Fats Domino to the Nevilles, Wynton Marsalis to Lil Wayne-and as portrayed in the series, Larry Blumenfeld and our live audience will consider what that mixture means.

Thursday, May 20, 2010

Harlem Speaks
Dave Samuels, Vibraphonist
6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Veteran Dave Samuels is widely recognized for his fresh new sound and creative approach to both the vibraphone and marimba. Although he’s best known for work with his current ensemble, The Caribbean Jazz Project as well as for his long tenure with Spyro Gyra, Samuels has also worked with a broad scope of artists ranging from Gerry Mulligan, Oscar Peterson, Chet Baker, Stan Getz, Carla Bley and Pat Metheny to the Yellowjackets, Bruce Hornsby, and Frank Zappa.

Samuels has been performing and recording with his group The Caribbean Jazz Project for over a decade; their most recent CD, Afro Bop Alliance, garnered a Latin Grammy and was also nominated for a Grammy. Some of his other recording projects include Remembrances, a percussion recording that features a commissioned marimba concerto for chamber orchestra and soloist composed by Jeff Beal, and Double Image—the vibe-marimba duo consisting of Dave Samuels & David Friedman—which is celebrating thirty years of performances. Double Image performs music which spans many styles - from jazz standards and original compositions to through-composed pieces and spontaneous improvisations, demonstrating Samuels deep versatility and spirit of collaboration.

In addition to his playing, Samuels is a respected educator and author and some of his new works can be found at MalletWorks.com and JazzBooks.com. Samuels has been voted “Best Vibes Player” in both Jazziz and Modern Drummer magazines, and was recently featured on the online jazz television show, Jazz it Up!

Friday, May 21, 2010

Jazz at the Dwyer
Take The A Train: A Big Band Swing Dance
7:00 – 11:00pm
Location: The Dwyer Cultural Center
(258 St. Nicholas Avenue at W. 123rd Street)
$20 | More information: info@DwyerCC.org
, presented with Community Works and The Dywer Cultural Center.

Featuring the NJMH All Star Big Band directed by Loren Schoenberg

Last month, Jazz at the Dwyer featured a romping Caribbean band; this month we’ll swing you into good health with the National Jazz Museum in Harlem All Star Big Band! The famed Big Band Swing era was full of dance bands that stomped and grooved with jitterbugging teens and adults following their every move. Tonight’s show is much more than nostalgia, it’s reclamation of an essential part of the dynamic that made jazz popular. Bring your dancing shoes!

Tuesday, May 25, 2010

Jazz for Curious Listeners
Tuning in to Tremé: Deeper Than the Water
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Weeks into the current HBO series that observes a city built on culture must be rebuilt with culture. That's precisely what is happening in New Orleans. How is this happening? Who are the artists and activists and organizations behind this cultural rebirth? And what can we learn from this experience about the role of culture in our lives and the needs of every American city?

Larry Blumenfeld, curator of this four-part JCL series on New Orleans, writes about music and culture for The Wall Street Journal, Village Voice and many other publications, and is editor-at-large of Jazziz magazine. He is a former Katrina Media Fellow with the Open Society Institute, researching cultural recovery in New Orleans.

BaoBao Festival @ Boulder Theater

Traditional West African dance drumming, music and storytelling. BaoBao Festival entertains, educates and builds community in Colorado through artistic performances and educational events inspired by West African tradition and culture. This multifaceted collaboration between local and international performing artists (including former members of the Ghana National Dance Ensemble, the Streetside Hip Hop Dance Troupe, and others) engages and entertains world culture fans of all ages. The festival, started by Boulder resident Adjei Abankwah, a lead dancer and choreographer with the Ghana National Dance Ensemble for 11 years, has been a perennial favorite among Boulder and Denver audiences.
GA / All Ages / $22.50 / Students: $18.50 / Children under 10 free

Tickets are on sale at The Boulder Theater Box Office. Call (303) 786-7030 for tickets by phone. Tickets are also available through our website @ www.bouldertheater.com. All tickets are subject to tax and service charge.

7th Annal BaoBao FestivalSaturday March 6doors 6:00pm, show 7:00pm

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JJ Grey: Still Culture Rich

photos by Kent Anderson & Amanda Bell- for the Grateful Web

There's nobody who can speak about the land as a Southerner can.