climate

Umphrey's McGee Collaborates with Patagonia for Environment

Patagonia Inc., the environmentally minded apparel company, and some of music’s most talented artists, including Umphrey’s McGee have come together to form the Patagonia Music Collective. The Patagonia Music Collective will launch Tuesday, March 1, 2011 at www.patagonia.com/music.

The collective brings together musicians, fans and grassroots environmental groups to raise funds for environmental causes. Artists, such as Umphrey’s McGee, have donated unreleased tracks that will be sold for $.99 with net proceeds going directly to the artist’s favorite environmental group. Visit www.patagonia.com/music for details.

Umphrey’s McGee has donated, “Hajimemashite”, a previously unreleased track, to benefit Climate Cycle.

“Patagonia is honored to have Umphrey’s McGee as a part of the Patagonia Music Collective,” notes Rob BonDurant, Patagonia’s VP of Marketing, “We’ve been stunned at the graciousness of artists like Umphrey’s McGee who so readily jumped at the chance to introduce their fans to an enviro cause they support. We’re so hopeful that fans will not only purchase this track, but learn about the work Climate Cycle is doing.”

The tracks will be available at www.patagonia.com/music, through a dedicated iPhone® app and a web widget player on participating artist’s websites. Fulfillment will be handled by iTunes®.

Patagonia views the “collective” as a new model for green giving, as well as a way to engage a non-Patagonia demographic in environmental activism. The Patagonia Music Collective will launch with 24 tracks with additional tracks released each subsequent week from established acts and emerging artists. Exclusive compilation records and more will be available at varying intervals at Patagonia stores worldwide.

Other musicians on board thus far include Jack Johnson, Pearl Jam, Bonnie Raitt and Jon Cleary, Maroon 5, Philip Glass, Zac Brown Band, moe., the Bad Plus, Blitzen Trapper, Mason Jennings, John Scofield, Piers Faccini, Switchfoot, Brett Dennen, Ky-Mani Marley, Sun Kil Moon, Ben Solee, Ra Ra Riot, Spoek Mathambo, Taj Mahal, Toad the Wet Sprocket, the Drive-By Truckers, Bobby Long, The String Cheese Incident, Ki: Theory, Moondoggies, Vusi Mahlesela, Disco Biscuits, O.A.R., Ziggy Marley, Los Lobos, Dawes, Abigail Washburn, Big Head Todd & The Monsters, Brandi Carlile and many more.

The Patagonia MusicTM Collective is not a record label. Artists are simply donating tracks for a sustainable music initiative that benefits the environment. Patagonia is providing a platform for artists to participate in a larger effort to increase awareness of both the enviro groups and causes artists would like to support and the music/artists associated with Patagonia Music.

Santa Barbara Celebrates Earth Day's 40th Anniversary with Earth Day Festival

On April 17-18, thousands of communities around the world will celebrate the 40th anniversary of Earth Day. On the California Central Coast, the community of Santa Barbara, together with regional not-for-profit Community Environmental Council, lays claim to sparking the Earth Day movement forty years ago.

This year, 20,000 will gather for Santa Barbara’s Earth Day 40 Festival (www.SBEarthDay.org) on April 17-18. Under the apropos 2010 theme “Bringing It Home,” the celebration recognizes not only Earth Day’s 40th Birthday, but also the community’s own legacy of environmental stewardship.

For four decades, Santa Barbara has harnessed its mindful community members, innovative leaders, and abundant access to renewable energy resources to help lead the environmental movement. Today, with the ongoing support of the Community Environmental Council and its aggressive “Fossil Free by ’33” initiative, the community continues to serve as a model for how to move an entire region away from fossil fuels.

In 1969, the devastating images of a massive oil spill from an oil platform off Santa Barbara’s coast galvanized California into action and caught the attention of the rest of the nation, including Senator Gaylord Nelson, founder of Earth Day. The resulting swell of outrage and concern gave rise to the first Earth Day in 1970, as well as to the creation of the Community Environmental Council – the largest and most established environmental organization in the region, and the host of Santa Barbara’s Earth Day 40 Festival.

Today, the Community Environmental Council (CEC) is leading a campaign to move Santa Barbara County away from fossil fuels in one generation – Fossil Free by ’33. This bold, regionally driven blueprint seeks to head off a nearly perfect storm of energy-related concerns, including rapidly diminishing oil supplies (“peak oil”), growing concern over our national security because of our dependence on foreign oil, volatile fuel prices, and climate change.

The Fossil Free campaign is particularly timely following the climate talks in Copenhagen last December, in which international leaders noted that more than half of the actions needed to address global warming will be led not by national or international policies, but through local initiatives and leadership.

“Copenhagen will likely be a central theme as communities around the world prepare for the 40th anniversary of Earth Day,” says CEC Assistant Director Sigrid Wright, noting that the collective international Earth Day events are expected to touch over a billion people. “We believe that climate change is the responsibility of every community to address and that Santa Barbara and California are out in front on this issue.”

In downtown Santa Barbara, the Santa Barbara Earth Day 40 Festival will offer real-world solutions, with participation by approximately 250 emerging green businesses, cutting edge technology vendors, and regional and national environmental organizations. Other features will include:

• a two-day amateur Green Shorts Film Festival,
• the largest known private
Green Car Show in the country, and
• a Green Home Pavilion – a re-enactment of a 1,200-square foot home, featuring the latest green construction materials, home décor products, and energy-saving appliances and technologies.

Earth Day brings us together to celebrate, recharge and focus our energies and resources on ending our dependence on fossil fuels,” says Wright.

“This is a pivotal time in history for the environmental movement because for the first time ever, being free of fossil fuels is actually within reach," says Wright. “The CEC and the community of Santa Barbara are committed to reaching this goal by 2033. The region has unique access to renewable energy resources – particularly the sun, wind and ocean. And, as history has shown, the size of the community – small enough change course with relative speed, yet large enough to matter when those changes are made - makes us poised to lead the charge."

GOV. RITTER EMBARKS TODAY ON CLIMATE EXPEDITION

Norwegian Arctic- for the Grateful Web

Following this week's G8 Summit, during which world leaders addressed the pressing issue of global warming, Gov. Bill Ritter (Colorado) announced he is embarking today on a weeklong climate-change expedition to the Norwegian Arctic.

The expedition, which runs through July 19, was organized and is being hosted by the Aspen Institute, National Geographic Society and Lindblad Expeditions. Gov. Ritter will be joining dozens of climate experts, Arctic specialists and leaders of industry, government, culture, religion and philanthropy aboard the National Geographic ship Endeavour.

The expedition sponsors invited Gov. Ritter to attend, present his Colorado Climate Action Plan and participate in policy discussions throughout the trip, including a panel on innovative leadership and climate change.

"Climate change is one of the most important issues of our time," Gov. Ritter said. "This is a challenge that requires unprecedented global cooperation and partnerships. This expedition offers a unique opportunity to exchange information, strategies and insights with a very diverse group of experts and leaders, and to see the impacts of climate change first-hand."

Gov. Ritter issued the Colorado Climate Action Plan in November. The Plan calls for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from 2005 levels by 20 percent by 2020 and 80 percent by 2050.

"Addressing climate change is extremely important to Colorado because our quality of life and so much of our economy – such as tourism, the ski industry, rafting, fishing and agriculture – are tied to our climate," Gov. Ritter said. "With these challenges also come opportunities, including economic and job-creation opportunities. Colorado's future very much depends on how we move forward, and it's vital that we have a leadership role."      

Over the past two years, the National Geographic Society's explorers, experts and photographers have participated on several Lindblad Expeditions trips, with a special focus on education and conservation. The Aspen Institute also has created a "Dialogue and Commission on Arctic Climate Change" to identify how action can be taken to strengthen and enhance responsibilities for a shared and sustainable future of the Arctic.

Some of the scientific experts on the expedition:

·         Sally Benson, executive director, Global Climate & Energy Project, Stanford University.

·         Robert Corell, director, Global Change Program, Heinz Center for Science, Economics and the Environment, and former chair of the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment.

·         Julian Dowdeswell, director, Scott Polar Research Institute, Cambridge University.

·         Professor Thomas Heller, Stanford University.

·         Henry "Jake" Jacoby, professor of management and co-director, MIT Joint Program on the Science & Policy of Global Change.

·         Michael Oppenheimer, Albert G. Milbank professor of Geosciences and International Affairs, Princeton University.

·         Professor Stefan Rahmstorf, Potsdam University, Institute for Climate Impact Research.