jackson

Into It. Over It. Announces North American Tour

Chicago-based, Philadelphia-raised indie-punk songwriter Evan Thomas Weiss, aka Into It. Over It., has announced plans to tour the US and Canada opening for UK-based Epitaph recording artist Frank Turner and American folk punk band Andrew Jackson Jihad. The tour, which stretches from late September to early November, follows Weiss' recent set of dates supporting Fake Problems, Pomegranates, Laura Stevenson and The Cans, Mansions and more.

In addition to the upcoming dates, Weiss and Into It. Over It. have announced plans to begin recording their debut full length album with producer Ed Rose (Get Up Kids, The Appleseed Cast, The Casket Lottery) at Blacklodge Studios in Eudora, KS. Tracking on the new record begins June 25th and lasts through July 9th, and will be released Fall 2011 on No Sleep Records.

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* Purchase the recently released Into It. Over It. / Such Gold split 7" at iTunes now!

Into It. Over It. Live!

w/ I Can Make A Mess Like Nobody's Business, Mansions
5/31 Off Broadway St Louis, MO
6/1 Mad Hatter Covington, KY
6/2 Smiling Moose Pittsburgh, PA
6/3 Jammin Java Vienna, VA
6/4 North Star Bar Philadelphia, PA

w/ Frank Turner and Andrew Jackson Jihad
09/20/2011 Danbury CT Heirloom Arts Theater
09/21/2011 New York NY Bowery Ballroom
09/222011 Millvale PA Mr Smalls
09/23/2011 Baltimore MD Ottobar
09/24/2011 Richmond VA Canal Club
09/25/2011 West Colombia SC New Brookland Tavern
09/27/2011 Orlando FL The Social
09/29/2011 Fort Lauderdale FL Culture Room
09/30/2011 Tampa FL Crowbar
10/01/2011 Atlanta GA Masquerade
10/03/2011 Austin TX Emo's
10/04/2011 Dallas TX The Loft
10/05/2011 Oklahoma City OK Conservatory
10/06/2011 Kansas City MO The Record Bar
10/07/2011 Denver CO Marquis Theater
10/08/2011 Albuquerque NM Launchpad
10/10/2011 Phoenix AZ Rhythm Room
10/11/2011 Pomona CA Glass House
10/12/2011 San Diego CA Soma
10/13/2011 Los Angeles CA El Rey Theater
10/14/2011 San Francisco CA Slim's
10/15/2011 Portland OR Hawthorne Theater
10/16/2011 Seattle WA Neumos
10/17/2011 Vancouver BC Biltmore Cabaret
10/19/2011 Edmonton AB Starlite Room
10/20/2011 Calgary AB Republik
10/21/2011 Regina SK The Exchange
10/22/2011 Winnipeg MB West End Cultural Center
10/23/2011 Minneapolis MN Triple Rock
10/25/2011 Milwaukee WI Turner Hall
10/26/2011 Chicago IL Bottom Lounge
10/27/2011 Detroit MI Magic Stick
10/28/2011 Toronto ON The Phoenix
10/29/2011 Montreal QC Corona
10/30/2011 Ottawa ON Maverick's
10/31/2011 Quebec City QC Cercle
11/02/2011 Cambridge MA Middle East
11/04/2011 Philadelphia PA Theater Of Living Arts

Wanda Jackson at the Boulder Theater | 4/1/11

When Wanda Jackson, the justly crowned Queen of Rockabilly, recorded “Let’s Have A Party,” a tune she made into a hit of her own in 1958 even after one-time boyfriend Elvis Presley had released a version of it, her delivery of the chorus wasn’t so much a suggestion as a command. As the title – and, more importantly, the contents -- of her latest album, The Party Ain’t Over, indicates, this feisty septuagenarian artist is as galvanizing as ever. Jackson was recently inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, honored with a long-time-coming, Early Influence accolade for her pivotal role in the evolution of popular music, especially where female artists were concerned. As a teenager in the mid-50s, the diminutive Jackson was the first woman to perform unadulterated rock and roll – and she one-upped the boys defining this new genre, Presley included, with her exhilaratingly forthright approach. The young Jackson, an Oklahoma native, came across as both gritty and glamorous; a playfully suggestive growl to her voice matched the daring, handmade outfits she wore, short skirts and fringed dresses that have inspired would-be bad girls for decades to come. A tireless touring artist for more than 50 years, Jackson continues to win over new, young fans, including guitarist-vocalist-White Stripes founder Jack White.

On this debut for Third Man/Nonesuch Records, produced and arranged by White at his Nashville studio, the spirited Jackson proves that brash rock and roll attitude need not have an age limit. Her trademark growl remains intact on rockers like “Rip It Up” and “Nervous Breakdown;” she opens the set with an echo-laden sneer on a rollicking version of “Shakin’ All Over” and ends it ten songs later with a plaintive take on Jimmie Rodgers’ “Yodel #6,” along the way gamely tackling country, gospel, densely worded Bob Dylan, and a little bit of Tin Pan Alley. Jackson and White are a remarkably simpatico pairing; their collaboration came together quickly, serendipitously. One of Jackson’s colleagues had originally approached White about doing a duet with Jackson for a proposed “Wanda and Friends” disc, but White demurred. Instead, he offered something better, inviting Jackson to cut a single with him for his Third Man label, and that swiftly led this kindred spirits to put together an entire album.

Jackson admits, “I was scared at first because I didn’t know what this young rock star was going to expect of me or ask me to do. I kind of had shaky feet, deciding whether I wanted to do this or not. Of course I knew about him, I have to admit, from the album he did with Loretta Lynn and how successful that was. That certainly got my attention when he said he was interested in doing one with me. So we began sending material to each other; he sent me the things he thought I should do or he wanted me to do, and I sent him some ideas of things I had put aside for recording at a future date. When I finally got to Nashville, he put me at ease immediately. He’s just so laid back and such a cool guy that I found myself wanting to please him, I wanted to do it his way. My husband (Jackson’s manager of 40 years) and I told him, you do this. If you want a suggestion from me, feel free to ask. Otherwise, you make the decisions. That gave him a lot of freedom and I wanted him to have that freedom. And I think that’s what made it so good as an album. As I began singing these songs and listening to the playbacks he made, I realized he wasn’t wanting to change my style of singing at all. He just wanted me to have new, fresher material. And I said, hey I could do this. I can sing like Wanda Jackson. He just wanted more of Wanda than I was used to putting out. And apparently it worked.”

White and Jackson came up with inspired and wide-ranging song choices that reflect Jackson’s long history with country, gospel, and even the big-band music she remembers from her childhood as well as with rock and roll: Harlan Howard’s woozy lament “Busted”; the Andrew Sisters’ kitschy tropical travelogue, “Rum and Coca Cola”, a fitting companion to her own “Fujiyama Mama”; Dylan’s rockabilly fever dream, “Thunder On The Mountain”. They also recorded a cover of contemporary bad-girl Amy Winehouse’s “You Know That I’m No Good,” which White first released as a single in 2009, paired with “Shakin All Over.” The Winehouse song suits her, Jackson says, but she’s careful to draw the line between life and art: “On the one hand, I’m good, on the other hand, I’m bad. That seems to be the image this new generation of fans that I have has given me. It’s like the title of the documentary about my life that recently came out: The Sweet Lady With the Nasty Voice. Maybe that says that I become a different person, a different persona, when I sing those songs. I have a good reputation, always have had, and respect from everyone as a lady, and that pleases me very much. But the young girls think I’m this hard gal that gets her way and storms in. It’s just because of the material I’ve sung and the way I’ve sung it. And that’s okay. That’s cute.

White himself backs Jackson on lead guitar, cutting loose with solos that are as ferocious and fun as Jackson’s vocals; in fact, the entire band that White assembled – including pedal steel, a horn section and backing vocals from singers Ashley Monroe and Karen Elson –is similarly uninhibited, matching Jackson’s and White’s intensity and, just as often, their humor. Though the work is carefully arranged, the resulting tracks feel like one unforgettable after-hours session, with everyone in thrall to the woman at the heart of these tunes. The first song White suggested they cut was “Rip It Up,” one Jackson knows very well from her rockabilly days. As she explains, “It shocked me that he wanted me to do that but that was the first one I recorded. He loves that song and I do too. But I think he did that to put me at ease, let me do something that I’m real familiar with and real comfortable with, and he didn’t have to direct me or any of that. I just reared back and sang it. That got me loosened up and made me comfortable.” Not that White simply wanted to make things easy. On the sultry “You Know I’m No Good,” says Jackson, “We’d get through one take and he’d say, ‘Oh Wanda that was great.’ And I said, ‘Whew, I made it.’ Then he said, ‘Now let’s do one more and let’s push a little more.’ I was getting physically kind of tired and probably kind of got angry but he got the take he wanted. It’s funny how you can come up with what your producers want in the strangest ways.” A little bit of their repartee can be detected at the top of the track, just as the analog tape gets rolling.

The Party Ain’t Over is about stepping out, not summing up, but it does touch on important aspects of Jackson’s life and ever-evolving career. “Teach Me Tonight,” a country-inflected interpretation of the DeCastro Sisters’ hit, partly fulfills Jackson’s desire to cut a 40s-style big-band disc. “Like A Baby,” recorded live in the studio with the whole band, allowed Jackson to revive an obscure, bluesy number from her old buddy Elvis. The Jimmie Rodgers tune is the first song she ever learned as a child; her father taught her the chords on the guitar, she figured out how to sing along while she played, and, like any aspiring vocal star of the era, she taught herself how to yodel, a skill she has clearly maintained over the ensuing decades.

Jackson remains too busy to look back – her legend looms especially large now in Europe and Japan, where she is always in demand as a concert performer – but she does allow herself a moment to reflect: “I can’t think of anyone who could be any luckier or any happier than me. I think it’s a blessing from the Lord. I had wonderful parents who gave up so much so that I could have my dreams come true. I was an only child so I had all the love and attention that anyone could ask for. My mother made my stage clothes and a lot of my street clothes too. Dad traveled with me and drove me to all those early dates so I didn’t have to be alone. You couldn’t ask for more, to make your living doing what you love to do, to sing and travel and entertain people all your life. I can’t think of any life that could be better than that.”

And, as she notes, the party ain’t over.

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Tickets are on sale at Boulder Theater Box Office. Call (303) 786-7030 for tickets by phone.

Tickets are also available through our website @ www.bouldertheater.com.

Tickets are On Sale Friday February 11th!

$20 adv / $22.50 dos

Wanda Jackson to play LP release show at ACM@UCO

The Academy of Contemporary Music at the University of Central Oklahoma will kick off the 2011 spring semester Jan 28 when Queen of Rockabilly Wanda Jackson comes to the Performance Lab for a free, release week concert celebrating her new Jack White-produced album, 'The Party Ain't Over' (out Jan 25).

It's been an unforgettable 2010 for ACM@UCO. The school hosted master classes and exclusive mentoring sessions with top artists, including Jackson Browne, the Mountain Goats and Local Natives. Many of the artists also performed concerts at the school's brand new music venue, The Performance Lab, which offers students hands-on experience in the world of live music booking, promotion, and production. Additionally, this semester's Industry Link seminar connected students with key industry figures, including high-profile managers and staff from Pitchfork, Sesac, and more.

Since its creation, The Academy of Contemporary Music at the University of Central Oklahoma has generated worldwide buzz with its innovative, groundbreaking approach to music education - the first of its kind in the United States. The school, which grants a two-year associate's degree in music performance and production, is the U.S. branch of Britain's groundbreaking Academy of Contemporary Music, based in Guildford, England.

Gary Wilson, Reigning King of Outsider Music, to Release Electric Endicott

In 1977 Gary Wilson famously released a uniquely bizarre and personal album titled You Think You Really Know Me..., full of electro-funk, proto-new wave, noise collage, and avant-garde jazz. Despite the fact that the album's fans included Beck, Questlove from The Roots, Simpsons creator Matt Groening, and Stones Throws' Peanut Butter Wolf, widespread fame and notoriety eluded Gary Wison until the 2002 re-release of his debut album. Soon after media outlets like Pitchfork, The Village Voice, and The New York Times were talking about the lecherous outsider artist, remarkable as much for his idiosyncrasies and DIY aesthetic as his edgy and creative music.

More than the perverted musings of a peeping tom, Gary's music is an honest reflection of ourselves…at least of that part of ourselves that loved our childhood pets more than we loved our parents, that worried if we'd ever make it to second base, or that really knows how often we floss. Equal parts Prince and Pee Wee Herman…Joe Jackson and Charlie Brown, Gary's songs celebrate our inner ickiness, silliness and grooviness, the romance and randiness of born-losers from Endicott or Anywhere. Rather than alienating us with their creepiness, his lyrics and melodies ultimately make us feel more comfortable being who we are....more comfortable being human.

Like ignoring the downfall and ruin of your hometown or clinging to the rotting corpse of your prom date that you've been keeping in your closet, on Electric Endicott Gary makes a choice, as many of us often do, to inhabit and mythologize, a time and place where he was the king or the charming jester, and Karen, Mary, and Linda were his fair princesses.

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The Warner Brothers Studio Albums + Dead.net exclusive

What a long, strange trip it's been! In celebration of the 40th Anniversary of Workingman's Dead and American Beauty, we proudly present THE WARNER BROS. STUDIO ALBUMS, a five-LP boxed set commemorating those tremendous and transformative early years. Due September 21st, the collection contains The Grateful Dead (1967), Workingman's Dead, and American Beauty (1970), plus the original mixes for Anthem Of The Sun (1968) and Aoxomoxoa (1969), available on vinyl for the first time in nearly 40 years!

This stunning set also features detailed replicas of the original albums housed in a hard-shell case with an accompanying 12" x 12" book containing unpublished photos and new liner notes by our friend Blair Jackson. And as always, we've ensured the highest degree of quality - these albums were pressed on 180-gram vinyl at RTI using lacquers cut from the original analog masters. Now all you've got to do is gently place the needle on the record and slip into auditory bliss!

Order from Dead.net and receive an exclusive reproduction of a rare 1968 7" single (in a picture sleeve) that features the studio version of "Dark Star" (b/w "Born Cross-Eyed"), clocking in at a concise 2:38. You'll also receive a reproduction of a rare 1967 promotional poster from the Warner Bros. Records archive. The 7" and poster are yours only when you place your order at Dead.net.

Aaron Davis Music | Jackson Hole, WY

Aaron Davis- for the Grateful Web

With the November release of his solo studio album "Rear View Mirror" (Yella Dog Records/2008), award-winning songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Aaron Davis breathes new life into roots music by keeping his mirror tilted towards the greats of the past while progressing into his own realm of Americana.

Based in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, Davis is a full-time performer and writer playing over 200 shows a year. Combining local gig residencies with tours through the Southeast, Rocky Mountains, and West Coast has created a great deal of opportunities for the Kentucky native—as a solo acoustic performer and with his rockin' ensembles.

Past performances include opening slots and show bills with Wilco, Willie Nelson, Yonder Mountain String Band, Medeski Martin & Wood, Brian Wilson, James McMurtry, Grace Potter & The Nocturnals, Kaki King, Reckless Kelly, Ben Winship, Blue Turtle Seduction, Mickey and the Motorcars, The Woodbox Gang and Anne & Pete Sibley. He has also performed live on Wyoming Public Radio (NPR), KMTN, and KHOL in Wyoming, Revolution 91.7 in Kentucky, and other regional stations.

Being frontman for several bands over the years (The Docks, Boondocks, Global Review, Screen Door Porch, Grilled Cheese), Davis decided to tap the scene for some of his favorite musicians, who contributed great performances to "Rear View Mirror." Known for his studio work with the Rolling Stones and live performances with Miles Davis, upright bassist Bill Plummer walked the line in "Leavin' the 9 to 5," "For Your Own Good," and "What the Hell, Grandpa," while mandolin master Ben Winship of Brother Mule and Loose Ties dished out licks on "Pass it On" and "What the Hell, Grandpa." The tight harmony singing of Margo Valiante is heard on eight tracks, as well as harmony from Seadar Rose and Michael Batdorf.

Opening track "1937," about life during the New Deal in Jackson Hole, received runner up honors at the 2008 Dreams Acres Music Festival Singer-Songwriter Contest in North Carolina. Alongside Brett Dennen and Xavier Rudd, Aaron also had one of his songs selected for the television series Road Trip Nation, which was featured online at MSN.com.

Chalked full of styles and textures from large, rockin' ensembles ("Mystery Woman") to stripped-down acoustic ("The Cardinal"), alt-country ("Still Drinkin' Your Whiskey") and rippin' slide guitar ("1937"), the 12-track disc is a ride through roots-based Americana. Push play and you'll hear folk, rock, blues, country, jazz and bluegrass.

davisAlways trying to reach the senses through lyrical groove and an expressive arsenal of sounds, his live show continues to create a buzz. While guitar is his bread and butter, Davis often layers his solo acoustic sound with a harmonica around his neck, and the occasional mandolin, banjo, kazoogle and foot percussion. Many have commented on Davis's organic-sounding bottleneck slide and his uncanny use of alternate tunings.

"Open tunings can create an entirely different energy for songs," he says. "I use the slide to add an element of edge to the mix, and there's more room for experimenting with pitch and raw sounds. I'll often take traditional songs in standard tuning and create new arrangements based on the original melody."

He is also the founder and producer of Songwriter's Alley, a regional songwriter concert series in Jackson Hole. The series gives up-and-coming songwriters the opportunity to perform in a listening, all-ages environment.

Davis's repertoire combines originals with creative arrangements of tunes by such artists as Dylan, Greg Brown, Woody Guthrie, The Rolling Stones, Townes Van Zandt, Neil Young, Wilco and old bluesmen such as Rev. Gary Davis and Blind Willie Johnson.

Aaron Davis's new release "Rear View Mirror," is available at cdbaby.com, digstation, iTunes, or by emailing him directly at ad@aarondavismusic.com.