administration

Tell Interior Secretary Salazar to reverse Bush administration attacks on endangered species

polar-bearsJust before leaving office, the Bush administration issued sweeping changes to the Endangered Species Act to weaken protections for imperiled wildlife, including polar bears, wolves and whales. These changes decrease scientific review for activities that could harm threatened and endangered species and prohibit the government from considering the impact of global warming pollution on polar bears and other wildlife.

Interior Secretary Salazar now has the opportunity to help reverse these destructive changes. In March President Obama signed a spending bill that allows Secretary Salazar to overturn President Bush's last-minute changes to the Endangered Species Act regulations as well as a separate rule that weakens Endangered Species Act protections for polar bears. But the Obama administration must act by May 10th, and opponents of the Endangered Species Act are working hard to convince Secretary Salazar that he should not withdraw these rules.

What to do

Send a message right away urging Secretary Salazar to withdraw the Bush administration's last-minute Endangered Species Act regulations and polar bear rule under the authority granted by President Obama and Congress

Tell the Bush administration not to let mining companies destroy valleys and streams

Stop Bush from polluting our streams!- for the Grateful Web

The Office of Surface Mining has proposed changes to its stream buffer zone rule that would make it easier for mining companies to bury natural streams and valleys under piles of mining waste and vast ponds of toxin-laden sludge. The changes would weaken environmental standards for mountaintop removal mining operations that, even under the stricter existing buffer rule, have buried hundreds of miles of streams and contaminated mountain waterways. The headwater streams threatened by the rule changes provide valuable habitat and feed larger waters that provide drinking water, fishing and other recreational opportunities.

An environmental review of the proposal confirms that the proposed changes could permit the destruction of hundreds of miles of streams and valleys in Appalachia, the region already hardest hit by these irresponsible mining practices. But despite these conclusions, and ignoring the pleas and protests of thousands of activists, the agency is pressing ahead with its proposal.

The Office of Surface Mining is now preparing to finalize these changes to the rule. Before it can do so, however, the Environmental Protection Agency must give its approval.

What to do:  Send a message, as soon as possible, urging the EPA to reject the Office of Surface Mining's plan to allow mining companies to destroy America's streams.