saturday

33rd Cape May Jazz Festival April 16-18, 2010

Immerse yourself in jazz vocals from ballads to low-down blues, mellow sax, high-pitch trumpet, Latin piano at the 33rd Cape May Jazz Festival April 16-18, 2010, presented by Bank of America and New Jersey Department of Travel and Tourism. Spyro Gyra opens up the festival Friday night with music that encompasses straight-ahead jazz, blues, Latin, Brazilian, instrumental pop, funk and fusion.  For more than 3 decades  Spyro Gyra has been dominating the contemporary jazz scene and still has a snap, originality and fresh sound which appeals to both old and new fans. Blues singer Shemekia Copeland opens up Saturday night with her huge, blast-furnace voice which gives her music a timeless power and heart-pounding urgency.  Her music comes from deep within her soul and from the streets where she grew up.

Friday night tenor saxophonist Tim Warfield, one of the most impressive young tenors around, will pay Tribute to Shirley Scott with his organ quintet. Warfield wanted to pay tribute to Shirley using the Hammond B-3 to relate his happy, soulful experiences with music they performed together, songs introduced by her or original compositions Warfield wrote with her in mind.  Continuing Friday night guitarist Monnette  Sudler will perform in Carneys Main Room with tenor Bootsie Barnes, trombonist Steve Turre and Aaron Graves on keys for a slamming hard-bop groove.  For a total change of pace vocalist Marta Topferova, who moved from Prague to New York City and immersed herself in the dynamic clusters of Latin American life, will entertain in Carneys Other Room with her elegant, low-key misty voice backed by stellar musicians who include Latin sounds from Cuban, Argentinian tango to Venezuelan rhythms. Mississippi Heat is one of Chicago’s hottest blues bands playing traditional Chicago blues with their  band leader’s golden tone on the harmonica and vocalist Inetta Visor permeating Cabanas  Friday night.

Saturday afternoon starts out with prejams  in both rooms at Carneys with the up-and-coming youth bands Tom Zmuda and Thursday Night Jazz and the Divine Jazz Combo followed by jam sessions.  Georgie Bonds, a world-class singer, songwriter and blues entertainer, will continue the blues tradition with Delta blues in Cabanas.

Saturday night continues with the exciting Cuban piano player Chuchito Valdes returning for 2 shows in the Grand Hotel Ballroom.  Chuchito raised a mountain of rhythmic intensity with power and passion at the April 2008 festival   following in the footsteps of his grandfather Bebo and father Chucho Valdes blending elements of Afro-Cuban music, jazz, bebop, mambo and cha-cha-cha.   Another jazz festival favorite vocalist Juanita Williams along with Fred Hughes on piano will perform at the Jazz Dinner and 11pm show in Aleathea’s Restaurant.  Juanita came up musically by way of gospel, was inspired  by  blues greats Etta James and Aretha Franklin and sings sweet soul music and gritty blues with originality, sass and flair.  Pianist Fred Hughes, another festival favorite, compliments Juanita playing dynamic piano solos.  Appearing in Carneys Main Room B. D. Lenz has been described as one of the hottest new contemporary jazz guitarists on the scene today fusing  jazz and rock complemented by warm chords of funk, soul, rhythm and blues to dance to.  Carneys Other Room presents The Shook-Russo Quartet who is composing their own original music within the jazz idiom honoring the masters by carrying on the mainstream tradition with the huge sound and driving groove of Amy Shook on bass and the incredibly skillful Frank Russo on drums.   Jesse Andrus, a favorite tenor/alto sax and flute player seen at the jams, will be in the Boiler Room with his group Absolute Truth Saturday night.  Absolute Truth weaves jazz with soul, R&B, African and Latin rhythms, gospel, blues and funk which creates a sound that is at once fresh and familiar honoring the masters who came before them while creating a sound all their own.   Performing in Cabanas the multi-talented  Ray  Schinnery  will stir the soul with his vocals, move you to hilarity with his lyrics and woo you with his guitar.
Pre-Jam Sunday opens up with the Little Jazz Giants and the Young Lions in 2 rooms at Carneys followed by 2 Jam Sessions along with the Charles Walker Blues Band in Cabanas.  Hailing from Wisconsin the 5-piece Walker band performs various styles of blues, R&B and funk with Walker’s expressive saxophone stealing the show along with Shanna Jackson’s  powerfully deep soulful voice.

The schedule, musician’s pictures, information and sounds bytes are found on the web at www.capemayjazz.org.  For more information on reduced price All Event Weekend Pass including reserved seating or to be put on the mailing list please call 609-884-7277.  An All Event Weekend Pass to attend 18 events beginning 8pm Friday through 4pm Sunday is $150 general admission. Individual Friday or Saturday Night All Event Wristbands are $55.  Saturday Afternoon Jam Wristbands are $35, Sunday Jams $25.  Reserved Seating is available at the Theatre at Lower Regional High School for an additional $25 per person. Complimentary Festival Transportation running every 10 minutes is available between venues all weekend.

The 33rd Cape May Jazz Festival is presented by New Jersey Department of State, Division of Travel and Tourism VisitNJ.Com and Bank of America and sponsored by the Delaware River and Bay Authority, Barefoot Wines, Jazz Times, WRTI Temple Public Radio, WBGO Jazz 88, WMGM  TV40, WCFA 101.5, WTTH the Touch, Cape May Star and Wave, Verizon Wireless with generous support from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts/Department of State, a partner agency of the National Endowment for the Arts, the New Jersey Cultural Trust, local businesses and donors.

Jake Hertzog Saturday, October 24th Midnight at the Iridium

Jake Hertzog is a jazz guitarist of and for the 21st century. While jazz guitarists of the 30s 40s and 50s drew their inspiration from Django Reinhardt and Charlie Christian, players in the 60s 70s and 80s were influenced by those luminaries as well as people like Tal Farlow, Jimmy Raney, Kenny Burrell and Les Paul. The next two decades found jazz guitarists listening to and playing like Wes Montgomery, Jim Hall, John McLaughlin, John Scofield, Joe Pass and Grant Green. Players in this century are mainly influenced by Pat Metheny, Mike Stern and people outside the jazz orbit like Jimi Hendrix. As a result they sound much different from their predecessors on the instrument – and I must confess there are some tracks on this CD outside my comfort zone. Nevertheless, there is so much wonderful music to savor that I can give this CD my highest recommendation. Hertzog's original compositions – particularly "Oberon" and "Lullabye for a Dreamer" are tuneful and imaginative and are likely to be discovered and performed by other jazz groups. Three selections feature pianist Michael Wolff, one of the outstanding pianists on today's jazz scene who seems right at home with Hertzog's songs. Michael's solo on "Nectarine" is one of this CD's many highlights. Bassist Harvie S demonstrates why he is one of the most in-demand players in jazz and latin music. Harvie has it all - intonation, creativity and a superb sense of time. His solos should be must listening to allaspiring young bassists and people who just enjoy hearing a great bass player. As for drummer Victor Jones: He and Hertzog have a special empathy -

Jake is a member of Victor's popular group Culturversey and on this CD Victor gives the proceedings, the spirit, fire and inventiveness that he gave to performances with Dizzy Gillespie, and Stan Getz. Then there is Jake's tender and heartfelt rendition of the standard "Falling in Love with Love" and finally I must mention the groups treatment of "In Your Own Sweet Way", my favorite track. This is quite simply the finest performance of this Brubeck classic that I have ever heard. Jake Hertzog is 22, a Berklee graduate and recipient of the 2006 Montreux Jazz Festival's Grand Prize in the Jazz Guitar Competition. Jake can be seen performing with The Naked Brothers Band and has performed with them on national television shows such as Good Morning America and ABC's The View, Nickelodeon Kids Choice Awards and NBC's TODAY show. In November 2008 Highlights in Jazz featured Jake performing with guitar legend Bucky Pizzarelli, 60 years his senior. The two bridged the generation gap and found a common musical ground that left the audience cheering. I feel certain that guitarists in the next decade will be citing Jake Hertzog as one of their major influences. Listen to this CD and I am sure you will give it a space on you CD shelf alongside your other favorite jazz guitarists.” -JACK KLEINSINGER

HERBIE HANCOCK & LANG LANG Saturday, Aug. 1st 8PM At NJPAC

herbie-hancockHERBIE HANCOCK & LANG LANG
with the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra
Saturday, Aug 1 at 8:00 Only At  NJPAC

Experience the phenomenal two-piano arrangement of Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue that electrified last year’s Grammys, plus other incredible shared and solo works!

Mozart: Overture to The Marriage of Figaro
Bernstein: Mambo from West Side Story
Ravel: Mother Goose Suite  – piano-four hands
Gershwin: Rhapsody in Blue – new arrangement for two pianos
Vaughan Williams: Concerto in C for Two Pianos
 

Tickets starting at $29!

 
How to Order
 

Online
Order online
 

By Phone
Call 1-888-GO-NJPAC (1-888-466-5722)
Click here for call center hours:
 
In Person
The box office is located at One Center Street, Newark, NJ.
Click here for box office hours

Groups
Groups of 20 or more save! Call 1-888-GO-NJPAC for more information.

Lang Lang Herbie Hancock Link

Brazilian Trio CD Release Party Friday and Saturday, October 24 and 25th at Sweet Rhythm

Brazilian Trio- for the Grateful Web

What The Critics Are Saying:

This trio is known for its samba jazz, and, indeed, "Forests" has an overarching vibe that's as chilled and elegant as a Jobim samba. In fact, Helio Alves (piano), Duduka Da Fonseca (drums) and Nilson Matta (bass) display a great deal more breadth in their performances than simply cruising in the samba groove. On "Montreux," they evoke a lovely, impressionistic feel in their measured approach. Their take on Milton Nascimento's "Vera Cruz" has a grandness that's nearly cinematic, particularly Alves' busy, articulate opening solo. Again bringing its skills to bear on a Nascimento tune, "Tarde," Alves plays with a gravity and a stylistic flair that's truly impressive. — Philip Van

Vleck Billboard Magazine

The Brazilian Trio consists of three Brazilian-born musicians who left their native land to expand their musical horizons in New York. Pianist Helio Alves has recorded extensively as a leader, while bassist Nilsson Matta and drummer Duduka Da Fonseca make up two thirds of the group Trio da Paz. The band is not a typical piano/bass/drums trio, but an interactive group with all members contributing to the arrangements. - Ken Dryden Allmusic.com

They explore gems by Milton Nascimento (including a shimmering, reflective rendition of "Tarde" and a driving romp through "Vera Cruz"), along with a breezy take of Ivan Lins' "Amor." Their originals, which make up half of the CD, are just as potent. Alves' sauntering samba "Ubatuba," Matta's "Forests" conveys both the beauty of Brazilian wilderness and the tense daily battle for survival among its inhabitants. Da Fonseca's easygoing, lyrical "Flying Over Rio" is also noteworthy.

A classical trio with a decidedly Brazilian flavor, Brazilian Trio presents a program containing a taste of the Brazilian repertoire along with original pieces that demonstrate the group's diversity and commitment to today's contemporary jazz sounds. The three New York-based musicians from Brazil, pianist Helio Alves, bassist Nilson Matta and drummer Duduka Da Fonseca, produce enough sophisticated modern jazz rhythms here that it would be incorrect to label this album as a Brazilian genre recording. This is contemporary straight ahead jazz with a slight Brazilian slant.

The program begins with one of the best by borrowing the Ivan Lins composition "Amor," and presenting the piece in a vibrant form as Alves lays down fabulous piano lines and Da Fonseca taps the cymbals throughout. The Album is dedicated to the Brazilian forests and with that in mind the title tune ("Forests") begins with the sounds of birds and other wildlife, is introduced by light piano lines and then powers up and moves quickly. Alves presents excellent jazzy grooves on his original "Samba Alegre" giving the bassist and drummer nice solo portions.

The trio plays a beautiful light ballad with Hermeto Pascoal's largely ignored "Montreux" in an attempt to give it new life and with this rendition, they do indeed provide the spark. Drummer Da Fonseca's only original here is a dandy. The brief but bossa colored "Flying Over Rio" has the drummer on the brushes on a warm cushy piece of music. The repertoire includes a couple of Milton Nascimento tunes with the soft "Tarde," and his classic composition of "Vera Cruz," a common closer for most samba jazz recordings, finishing with a marvelous performance from Alves.

I was thoroughly enthralled by "Forests" as it is not your typical piano trio recording. The three Brazilians play their hearts out with a fiery yet graceful performance of beautiful Brazilian and modern jazz music. - Edward Blanco Ejazznews

Ah, a great Brazilian take on the classic jazz trio format.  A transplanted bunch of hard workers tilling the fields of the Big Apple serve up a lovely cross pollinated date that's sure to hit a nerve with jazzbos and samba fans.  It's unembellished but it doesn't need bells and whistles to make it's point with anything other than great playing.  In general, the piano trio has a fine history and this adds a great new leg to the format's legacy. Check it out. - CHRIS SPECTOR MIDWEST RECORD

This trio consists of three of Brazil's best jazz musicians with pianist Helio Alves, drummer Duduka Da Fonseca and Nilson Matta on bass. They are all based in New York but retain strong roots in Brazil. Each is a formidable jazz artist and they have successfully melded American jazz and samba for Forests. It is a combination of originals and Brazilian standards that will resonate with fans of both segments. Highlights are "Montreux", Alves dancing across the keys on "Pro Zeca" and "Vera Cruz". - D. Oscar  Groomes O's Place Jazz Newsletter

This exciting recording is a perfect example of the thorough absorption of the Bossa Nova being integrated with the mainstream jazz piano trio. All three members of Brazilian Trio are, in fact, Brazilians but have lived in New York City for decades,settling in the 1970s, '80s and '90s.

Pianist Helio Alves is the youngest of the three, having worked with Oscar Castro-Neves, Rosa Passos and Paquito D'Rivera. His decidedly modal approach to piano jazz is undoubtedly a credit to the influence of Bill Evans.

Like Alves, bassist Nilson Matta hailed from Sao Paulo and has been a prolific musician seemingly appearing on scores of dates over the years. Drummer Duduka Da Fonseca relocated from Rio in 1970 and has been a vital part of the New York jazz scene ever since; at one time he was a part of the Don Pullen Afro-Brazilian Connection. His wife is Brazilian vocalist Maucha Adnet, who has established herself as a primary interpreter of Antonio Carlos Jobim. Da Fonseca and Matta form two-thirds of Trio Da Paz along with guitarist Romero Lubambo.

The music on Forests, while reflecting the pulse and passion of Brazil, is not really Bossa Nova or Samba. Rather, it represents a synthesis of those forms with the style of the American jazz trio. The tunes are redolent of the forests of Brazil, presented in a manner that moves the music into a new category.

Opening with Ivan Lins' lovely "Amor," featuring Alves' lyrical piano, the session moves into Matta's title tune, dedicated to the forests of the Earth and in particular the Amazon Rain Forest, with Da Fonseca offering some tasty brushwork. Milton Nascimento contributes "Tarde," a beautiful melody that is limned again by Alves' Bill Evans-style work. Hermeto Pascoal's "Montreux" is a hard-to-find and rarely recorded title that made its debut at the 1979 Montreux Jazz Festival. The album concludes with Nascimento's popular "Vera Cruz," a full blown jazz samba.

One significant observation about Brazilian Trio is that, despite its members' individual recording experiences, this is a fully interactive trio, bringing the distinctive touch of Brazil to a faraway studio. - Michael P. Gladstone Allaboutjazz.com

Forests marks the auspicious debut of the Brazilian Trio - pianist Helio Alves, bassist Nilson Matta and drummer Duduka Da Fonseca - three musicians already well known in Brazilian jazz circles, having played with an impressive list of Latin icons, including Paquito D'Rivera, Rosa Passos and Antonio Carlos Jobim.

While the traditional piano trio format serves them well, the group's bicultural background takes the music deeper. All three hail from Brazil yet have made New York their home. Alves' improvising sounds like he absorbed the best of Bill Evans, Matta's bass playing is tasteful, supportive and, at the same time, stylistically unique and Da Fonseca's percussion work is nothing short of masterful.

The album is a mix of original compositions and tunes from Brazilian masters such as Milton Nascimento and Victor Assis Brasil. "Amor," the opening track by Ivan Lins, sets a mellow groove; "Samba Alegre," an Alves original, showcases the trio's seamless interplay and rhythmic chops and Nascimento's "Tarde" comes off like the musical embodiment of a sunset.

The skillful ensemble work of these musicians makes this recording particularly enjoyable. In their experienced hands, this collection of samba jazz originals and well-chosen classics is a great listen. - Karen Hogg All About Jazz NY