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Wade Barnes & The Bottom Line Ensemble at the Moldy Fig Jazz Club

Called, “The Future of Bebop (House of Blues, Review May 5, 2000), Wade Barnes is certainly considered by many to be one of the great drummers, and composers.  The Albany Times Union stated about his appearance at the 1997 Saratoga Jazz Festival, “Mr. Barnes has developed into a premier drummer, composer, and educator.”

Receiving a Master of Arts, in Music, Vermont College, Norwich University and two Bachelor of Arts degrees in Music, Empire State College, S.U.N.Y., and in History, Queens College, after years of study and performing in New York City, as a teenager, has facilitated a holistic conception which incorporates the entire history of American music.

Drummers, who were born in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries such as: Cornelius Tillman; Buddy Gilmore; Paul Barbarin; Baby Dodds; and Chick Webb have been extremely influential. Notwithstanding, Wade Barnes is commonly recognized as extending the tradition of the drums, pioneered by drummers Kenny Clarke, Max Roach, ‘Philly’ Joe Jones, and Roy Haynes. It has been stated, by many, that Mr. Barnes has the “swing of Philly Joe Jones and the technique of Buddy Rich.” Although all the musicians stated above have been profound influences, Wade Barnes has incorporated the ideas of these and others, to fashion his very distinct personal sound.

Mr. Barnes is the director of The Brooklyn Repertory Ensemble (a 17 member ensemble) noted for its unique sound. In addition, he leads smaller ensembles. Two of his other regular working bands are: Wade Barnes and The Bottom Line (a ten member ensemble); and Wade Barnes and Unit Structures. Mr. Barnes, also, performed with: “Doc” Cheatham; Earle Warren; Dicky Wells; Howard McGhee; Cecil Payne; Leonard Gaskin; Joe Knight; Franklin Skeets; Candido; Albert Dailey; Billy Mitchell; Benny Powell; Jimmy Garrison; Bob Crenshaw; Archie Shepp; George Coleman; James Spaulding; Sonny Fortune; Jon Faddis among others.

Mr. Barnes has performed in venues such as: The Smithsonian Institute; The JVC Festival (in New York City and Saratoga Springs, N.Y.); Sweet Basil, Slug’s Saloon, The Village Vanguard, Small’s; Fat Cat; and The Iridium, New York City; Larry’s Hideaway, Toronto; The Rising Sun, Montreal; Snug Harbor, Satchmo Summer Fest and Club Strut, Tiptina’s, Ashe Cultural Arts Center, New Orleans.

His discography includes: Pragmatic Optimism, The Brooklyn Repertory Ensemble (360 Records); Passport To Brooklyn, The Brooklyn Repertory Ensemble (Progressive Records); The Brooklyn Four Plus One, Self-titled, (Progressive Records); The Sounds…They Show Us, The Wade Barnes Septet (360 Records); Bridgin’The Gap, The Brooklyn Conservatory Faculty Jazz Ensemble (360 Records); Deane’s Basics, Deane and The Jazz Masters (Progressive Records); In Your Eyes, Linda Presgrave (Metropolitan Records); Wild As The Wind, Pucci Amanda Jhones (CIMP Records); Fantasy For Orchestra, The Universal Jazz Symphonette (Independent).

The Brooklyn Four Plus One Inc. has been awarded grants to conduct education programs from: The Charles Evans Foundation; The New York City Council and The Department of Cultural Affairs; The Music Performance Fund; The Vermont Arts Council; Vermont College; New England Life; and The Jazz Foundation Of America. The grants were awarded to The Brooklyn Four Plus One Inc. in order to administer music education programs created by Mr. Barnes.

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WADE BARNES AND THE BOTTOM LINE ENSEMBLE
Appearing Monday nights at the Moldy Fig Jazz Club
Beginning Monday, July 11, 2011
Time: 8pm - 12am  | Cover - $5.00
The Moldy Fig Jazz Club is located at 178 Stanton Street between Clinton and Attorney.    Lower East Side, NY
Open from 5:00pm to 2:00am Sun. - Thur. and 5:00pm to 4:00am Fri. and Sat.

National Jazz Museum in Harlem Nov. 15 - Nov. 21, 2010 Schedule

Upcoming events at the National Jazz Museum in Harlem for this week include:

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Tuesday, November 16, 2010

Jazz for Curious Listeners
Savory Collection Part 2: Count Basie – 1930s
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300
The Savory Collection may well redefine the critical view of jazz in the late 1930s. Dan Morgenstern, Director of the Institute of Jazz Studies, provides proof of this claim in the New York Times by "citing the case of Herschel Evans, a saxophonist who played in the Count Basie Orchestra but who died early in 1939, just before his 30th birthday. Evans played alongside Lester Young, who was one of the giants of the saxophone and constantly overshadowed Evans on the Basie group’s studio recordings.

“There can never be too much Lester Young, and there is some wonderful new Lester Young on these discs,” Mr. Morgenstern said. “But there are also some things where you can really hear Herschel, who is woefully under-represented on record and who, until now, we hardly ever got to hear stretched out. What I’ve heard really gives us a much better picture of what he was all about.”

That's just one of the wonders of Basie you'll hear tonight!

Friday, November 19, 2010

Harlem in the Himalayas
Meg Okura / Pan Asian Chamber Jazz Ensemble
7:00pm
Location: Rubin Museum of Art
(150 West 17th Street)
$18 in advance | $20 at door |
For tickets: RMA Box Office <http://click.icptrack.com/icp/relay.php?r=-1&amp;msgid=0&amp;act=11111&amp;c=246760&amp;destination=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.rmanyc.org%2Fharleminthehimalayas%2F>  or call 212-620-5000 ext. 344
Meg Okura is “the queen of chamber jazz,” says Dan Bilawsky in All About Jazz. In her Pan Asian Chamber Jazz Ensemble, Okura skillfully balances her roles as violin virtuoso, prolific composer, and master erhu player. Comprised of a group of young virtuosi, the Pan Asian Chamber Jazz Ensemble brilliantly weaves together jazz, classical, and traditional Japanese music to create their own unique blend of world-chamber jazz. They have been hailed by the New York Times as “vibrant” and “sophisticated.” See and hear why this evening in the intimate setting of the acoustically rich theater at the Rubin Museum of Art.

Saturday, November 20, 2010

Saturday Panels
Savory Saturday
12:00 – 4:00PM
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300
Come have an extended listening session and hear live music, all based around new discoveries unheard for 70 years. By now, if you're a jazz fan attuned to history, you're aware of the Savory Collection. But whether you're a long time fan, or a newbie, you owe it to yourself to experience this gold mine find from the vaults of jazz lore.

Ornette Coleman Receives Honorary Doctorate of Music from the University of Michigan

Music legend Ornette Coleman received an honorary doctorate of music from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.  The Department of Jazz and Contemporary Improvisation of the School of Music, Theatre and Dance congratulates Mr. Coleman on this great honor, his 80th birthday, and for being one of the most important musicians and innovators of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.  The event also included a commencement address by President Barack Obama.

THE OFFICIAL CEREMONY TEXT

“Mr. Coleman, your performances and your path-breaking theories of jazz and music have transformed how musicians play and what listeners hear.  Your self-taught musical education blossomed into a radically novel sound, giving the world musical styles it had never heard before.  In your long career of ongoing creativity, you have played a vital role in preserving and enhancing America’s cultural legacy, and you have cultivated the talent of the future.  The University of Michigan is proud to present you with the honorary degree, Doctor of Music.”


MORE ABOUT ORNETTE COLEMAN

Ornette Coleman is a leading composer and performer of jazz, whose remarkable artistry is admired around the world.  Born in Fort Worth, Texas, in 1930, he taught himself how to play the saxophone and had formed his first band by the age of fourteen.  After touring with a traveling ensemble, he moved to Los Angeles and began to teach himself music theory while working as an elevator operator.  During this period, he performed with a rehearsal ensemble that allowed him to experiment with the new theoretical concepts he was developing.  The result of his self-study was a new freedom in jazz performance that has been described as a radically new concept and style that originated from his musical intuition, combining southwestern country blues and his own highly personal interpretations of music theory.  The compositional voice that Mr. Coleman developed in the 1950s would remain his trademark style and sound throughout his career.  The first of his many influential albums was recorded in 1958, released under the title Something Else, which launched him as a major innovator of jazz, leading to many more albums and a famous breakthrough engagement at the Five Spot Café in New York City, where he moved permanently.  His music, freed from the conventions of harmony, rhythm, and melody, both polarized and transformed the jazz community, and he devoted decades to understanding and discovering the shape of not just jazz, but all music to come.  At the core of his music is his theory of Harmolodics, which addresses the question of the sound and performance of music beyond the melody.  Beyond the twenty albums he released in the 1960s, Mr. Coleman also began to write string quartets, woodwind quintets, and symphonies based on his pioneering theories of musical composition.  His remarkable contributions to music have been recognized by a multitude of honors, including several honorary degrees, appointment as a MacArthur Foundation Fellow, induction into the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and the presentation of the prestigious Praemium Imperiale Award of the Japanese government.  In 2007 he was honored with a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award, and won the Pulitzer Prize in Music in 2007 for his album Sound Grammar.  In 2009 he became the 16th musician in history to be presented with the Miles Davis Award, in recognition for his regeneration of the jazz idiom.  His recent 80th birthday in March was marked with a variety of tributes, from articles, to concerts, to all-day broadcasts of his music.

GNU VOX: SARA SERPA Tonight At Cornelia Street Cafe

Sara Serpa is a vocalist wielding an instrument as favorably unadorned and pure as any in jazz. She's the freshest vocalist on the scene at the moment, not just because she's new to it at age 28. It's certainly not because of the way she delivers a lyric, since there usually aren't any. Being from Portugal is also irrelevant, for like much of the great jazz coming our way in the past few years from Lisbon, there is nothing overtly ethnic about the music; it's sensuous, transporting, sultry and warm.

A main reason is that with one recording in, she raises profound questions regarding the previous role of the vocalist in jazz. What's radical, is that it's not about the ridiculous chops or inhuman gymnastic training or trickery. She sings as an instrumentalist, as a member of an ensemble with a bold conception, moving seamlessly as would a saxophonist from melodist to soloist, or from a front line horn to an ensemble voice—not the star of some show. Serpa sounds as if she's talking right to you, even though she's singing, not just in terms of the intimacy quotient, but in terms of the actual sound of it—literally, she sounds as if she must sing whenever she speaks." (Phil DiPietro, All About Jazz)

Thu  Apr 22nd 8:30PM   
GNU VOX: SARA SERPA

CORNELIA STREET CAFÉ
29 Cornelia Street, NYC, New York| 212-989-9319
http://www.corneliastreetcafe.com

Delfeayo Marsalis 'Charlie Parker with a Twist' at The Iridium

A multiple Grammy Award winner as a producer, trombonist Delfeayo Marsalis "solos with authority, inserting musical quotes spontaneously as the mood takes him in different directions" (All About Jazz). He comes from a New Orleans musical family that includes not only his older brothers Branford and Wynton, but also his father, renowned pianist Ellis Marsalis, and his younger brother, drummer Jason. The San Francisco Examiner calls him "one of the best, most imaginative and musical of the trombonists of his generation. His fluid expression and keen melodic sense are especially commendable."

As a trombonist, Delfeayo has toured internationally with legendary jazz artists Art Blakey, Abdullah Ibrahim, Elvin Jones, Slide Hampton and Max Roach, as well as touring with his own modern jazz ensemble. During a tour with the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra, he was filmed as part of the Ken Burns documentary, ” Jazz.”  A mainstay on the New Orleans modern jazz scene, he has released three solo albums to critical acclaim ONTIUS PILATE'S DECISION in 1992, MUSASHI in 1997, and MINIONS DOINION. http://www.delfeayomarsalis.com/

IRIDIUM
1650 BROADWAY (CORNER OF 51ST)
NEW YORK, NY 10023
RESERVATIONS: 212-582-2121
HTTP://WWW.IRIDIUMJAZZCLUB.COM/
Starting March 1st Set Times Will Be 8 and 10 PM

Bing and Ruth Premiere Debut Single "Rails"

Brooklyn band Bing and Ruth is an 11-piece ensemble led by composer and pianist David Moore.  Described by the New York Times as "making the most of layered and atmospheric melody," the band utilizes clarinets, voices, cellos, and a buffet of other acoustic instruments to craft expansive soundscapes and quiet microtonal textures.  Formed among friends in 2006, they have self-released two records, the "Bing and Ruth" EP in 2006, and the full-length "Kentile Floors" in 2007.

In it's young life the ensemble has garnered a reputation for unique and engaging life performances, with recent shows in the New York area including the Wordless Music Series, the MATA Festival, the WFMU Festival, Stochastic Brooklyn, and the Darmstadt New Music Series at Issue Project Room.  They have shared the stage with a wide variety of performers among whom include Múm, Max Richter, and So Percussion.

Additionally they have become known for their habit of performing in unique spaces not normally associated with music; places like an abandoned meat locker, a rural chicken coop, a vacant apartment, and a warehouse rooftop.

David, along with Bing and Ruth, was recently commissioned to create two new multimedia works with filmmaker Sébastien Cros that saw their premier at the 2009 MATA Festival in New York City.

The ensemble has recently completed work on a new full-length album with an expected release in 2010.

BaoBao Festival @ Boulder Theater

Traditional West African dance drumming, music and storytelling. BaoBao Festival entertains, educates and builds community in Colorado through artistic performances and educational events inspired by West African tradition and culture. This multifaceted collaboration between local and international performing artists (including former members of the Ghana National Dance Ensemble, the Streetside Hip Hop Dance Troupe, and others) engages and entertains world culture fans of all ages. The festival, started by Boulder resident Adjei Abankwah, a lead dancer and choreographer with the Ghana National Dance Ensemble for 11 years, has been a perennial favorite among Boulder and Denver audiences.
GA / All Ages / $22.50 / Students: $18.50 / Children under 10 free

Tickets are on sale at The Boulder Theater Box Office. Call (303) 786-7030 for tickets by phone. Tickets are also available through our website @ www.bouldertheater.com. All tickets are subject to tax and service charge.

7th Annal BaoBao FestivalSaturday March 6doors 6:00pm, show 7:00pm

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Fareed Haque +The Flat Earth Ensemble New CD 'Flat Planet'

Flat Planet- for the Grateful Web

Hindustani music swings! says Fareed Haque, leader of the Flat Earth Ensemble. A jazz and classical guitar virtuoso, Haque's latest project is the culmination of years of study and innovation, a blending of Hindustani folk rhythms and groove jazz. All my life Ive loved the rhythms of South Asian folk music the folk music from northwestern India and Pakistan, that is the basis for much of what is today called Bollywood film music, Qawwali, Bhangra. All of these are styles of South Asian music that GROOVE with hypnotic, high energy, danceable rhythms...much the same as the African-American gospel that is the basis of so much popular American music. In South Asia, as on the South Side of Chicago, charismatic music music that builds to an emotional and many would say spiritual climax is at the core of traditional culture and the basis for much in popular culture...simply put Punjabi folk music is to India what gospel is to America funky, fun, danceable and spiritual.

"Its a perfect match...I remember listening to Hindustani film and folk music as a child [Haque's lineage is Pakistani and Chilean], and the way that music shuffles is right up there with most jazz shuffles... I remember going to see the Sabri Brothers, a Qawwali group from Pakistan, and the audience was losing it! Rolling on the stage, going into the same kind of trance that once might see at a gospel revival in Mississippi."