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Vince Gill, Sam Bush, Ricky Skaggs and More Join Moody Bluegrass Two

Following 2004’s critically and commercially acclaimed tribute to the legendary Moody Blues, the GRAMMY nominated Moody Bluegrass, along with the highly successful Moody Bluegrass Live, Nashville’s finest have come together again to honor the Moody Blues with Moody Bluegrass Two…Much Love available nationwide on June 21, 2011.

“We have had so many cover versions of our songs over the years, but none have stood out like Moody Bluegrass. Nashville's most outstanding musicians have once again brought a new dimension to our songs, “ said Ray Thomas, co-founder of the Moody Blues.

Producer David Harvey returns for this second volume, which perfectly blends the brilliant songwriting of the Moody Blues with the bluegrass sounds of mandolins, banjos and even clogging. The collection of bluegrass covers includes Moody Blues members Justin Hayward, John Lodge and Graeme Edge, as well as band co-founders Mike Pinder and Ray Thomas and a wide assortment of Music City’s finest including Vince Gill, Sam Bush and Ricky Skaggs.

The record spans the entire Moody Blues catalogue, and includes fan favorites such as "Tuesday Afternoon" and "I Know You're Out There." Moody Bluegrass Two translates the Moody Blues’ original songs seamlessly and much like the first bluegrass tribute, the beauty of the original Moody Blues music shines.

Moody Bluegrass Two also features the talents of Tim O'Brien, Harley Allen, Peter Rowan, Jan Harvey, Ronnie Bowman, Emma Harvey, Larry Cordle, John Cowan, Jon Randall, David Harvey, Tim May, Andy Hall and Andy Todd.

For more information visit www.moodybluegrass.com.

Time, NYT Laud Jake Shimabukuro

It's been a banner year thus far for Jake Shimabukuro. His new album 'Peace Love Ukulele' (HITCHHIKE RECORDS) debuted at #1 on the Billboard World Album chart, and has brought the Hawaii native national acclaim from NPR, YouTube and others. Time Magazine and the New York Times can now be added to the list in praise of Shimabukuro's virtuosic ukulele playing.

Nate Chinen of the New York Times said of a recent performance Shimabukuro at Brooklyn Bowl:

"Shimabukuro… comes by his fame with buoyant musicianship and brisk proficiency. The innovation in his style stems from an embrace of restrictions: the ukulele has only four strings and a limited range. He compensates with an adaptable combination of rhythmic strumming, classical-style finger-picking and fredboard tapping."

Read the entire review here.

Shimabukuro and his ukulele are also featured in a Time Magazine article by Tim Morrison about the instrument and its sudden surge in popularity. Morrison notes that a quick Google search of ukulele "won't be some grainy clip of Tiny Tim or George Formby but a performance by a hair-gelled 34-year-old Hawaiian named Jake Shimabukuro."

Read the Time Magazine piece here.

Read Grateful Web coverage of Jake here.