2004

Voice Of The Wetlands All Stars @ Boulder Theater | 2/3/11

Voice of the Wetlands was established in 2004 as a volunteer-based non-profit, focused on driving awareness and developing educational outlets/programs about the loss of the wetlands in southern Louisiana. VOW was started by musician Tab Benoit who was born and raised in Houma, LA - one of the communities born of the wetlands. Tab along with Rueben Williams and a coalition of local artists and business leaders recognized the urgency to save their homes and the culture of southern Louisiana.

Since its inception, VOW has hosted a number of efforts including an annual free, 3-day festival since 2004, and a bold initiative of taking over 50 New Orleans musicians to perform at the 2008 Democratic and Republican National Conventions. In addition, VOW has been represented to the federal government by Tab during sessions on Capitol Hill in 2008. The sessions focused on the urgency of restoring and the need to preserve the Louisiana wetlands.

Voice of the Wetlands takes an active role in driving awareness to restore the wetlands from a local to a national level. The organization prides itself in maintaining a mission that addresses all aspects, causes and solutions.



Voice of the Wetlands is the only wetlands restoration and preservation organization comprised of members who were born and raised and continue to live in the communities created from Louisiana's wetlands.

More Info / Buy Tickets

Voice of the Wetlands All Stars @ Boulder Theater

Z2 Entertainment is proud to present Voice of the Wetlands All Stars Ft. Tab Benoit, Anders Osborne, Cyril Neville, Big Chief Monk Boudreaux, Jumpin Johnny Samsone & Waylon Thibodeaux at the Boulder Theater on Thursday February 3rd.

Voice of the Wetlands was established in 2004 as a volunteer-based non-profit, focused on driving awareness and developing educational outlets/programs about the loss of the wetlands in southern Louisiana. VOW was started by musician Tab Benoit who was born and raised in Houma, LA - one of the communities born of the wetlands. Tab along with Rueben Williams and a coalition of local artists and business leaders recognized the urgency to save their homes and the culture of southern Louisiana.

Since its inception, VOW has hosted a number of efforts including an annual free, 3-day festival since 2004, and a bold initiative of taking over 50 New Orleans musicians to perform at the 2008 Democratic and Republican National Conventions. In addition, VOW has been represented to the federal government by Tab during sessions on Capitol Hill in 2008. The sessions focused on the urgency of restoring and the need to preserve the Louisiana wetlands.

Voice of the Wetlands takes an active role in driving awareness to restore the wetlands from a local to a national level. The organization prides itself in maintaining a mission that addresses all aspects, causes and solutions.

Voice of the Wetlands is the only wetlands restoration and preservation organization comprised of members who were born and raised and continue to live in the communities created from Louisiana's wetlands.

Antibalas 'Who Is This America?' Reissued by Ropeadope

Antibalas is set to have their modern day afrobeat classic, Who Is This America?, reissued by Ropeadope on August 17. While it's common for influential recordings to receive reissue treatment decades later or around specific anniversaries, Ropeadope has made the decision to bring back the Brooklyn-based collective's 2004 album just six years from its initial release for one primary reason: "The questions and powerful social statements on the record are as relevant today as they were in 2004. 'Big Man' is a powerful musical essay on consumerism and the system of continued oppression that it supports, while the title track is even more poignant as our nation continues the struggle for its collective identity in the face of a changing world."

The third album to be recorded and released by Antibalas through that point in time, Who Is This America? was conceived in post-September 11th New York City. As George Bush tried (and later succeeded) in holding on to his presidency, Antibalas was fueling the fires of protest with its powerful musical rhetoric. The 17-piece band simultaneously indicted politicians, ignited a musical tsunami and turned a new generation of listeners on to afrobeat for the first time. In a May 2004 review of the seven-track effort, Pitchfork declared: "Who Is This America?, which in the midst of the current trickle-up afrobeat revival, has Antibalas bringing a more galvanized and urgent righteous noise than ever before, and proving they lead the pack when it comes to the re-imagining and recreating of Fela's archetypal art-form."

Who Is This America? will be reissued on CD with a previously unreleased track produced by Scott Harding entitled "Money Talks." The iTunes version of the reissue will include the exclusive cut, "Paz." Additionally, a special limited edition package featuring the CD, the album download and a reprint of the original Ropeadope "Running Man" t-shirt will be sold at both Antibalas' and Ropeadope's websites.

Formed in Brooklyn circa 1998, Antibalas has shared its dynamic afrobeat and funk sound with 35 countries and over 1000 performances. From humble beginnings at Brooklyn block parties and community benefits, Antibalas has since been featured at prestigious festivals including Coachella, Glastonbury, Montreux, Newport Jazz, and at venues from Riker's Island to Carnegie Hall. Drawing on musical lineages steeped in jazz, funk, Afro‐Caribbean and West African music, the collective is widely recognized for its mastery of and innovation in the afrobeat musical form created in the early 1970s by Nigerian composer/activist Fela Anikulapo-Kuti. Members of Antibalas teamed up with the Dap‐Kings to create the grooves for Amy Winehouse's multi‐platinum Back to Black and continue to work with producer Mark Ronson. The horn section is featured prominently on albums by TV On The Radio and Medeski, Martin & Wood, while winning a Grammy Award for their work on Angelique Kidjo's Djin Djin. Most recently, members of the collective were at the heart of the Tony Award-nominated musical FELA! Born from a series of workshops with director/choreographer Bill T. Jones in late 2006, Antibalas' musicians Aaron Johnson (musical director), Jordan McLean (assistant musical director) and Stuart Bogie helped create what associate producer Questlove called, "the most uncut funk production ever!" After a triumphant Off‐Broadway run, the show opened on Broadway in November 2009 at the Eugene O’Neill Theatre.

Tea Leaf Green, Oct. 14 @ the Fox Theatre

San Francisco-based band Tea Leaf Green got their start in the relationship formed between guitarist Josh Clark and drummer Scott Rager, who played in a high-school band together in Arcadia, CA. After graduation, Rager enrolled at San Francisco State College, where he met bassist Ben Chambers. When Clark moved to San Francisco, the three began playing together as a trio. Their first paying gig was attended by Trevor Garrod, a singer/songwriter and keyboard player who had moved to San Francisco looking for other musicians to play with. Garrod met the three others, and soon they were playing together as a quartet. They built a following in Northern California and self-released the albums Tea Leaf Green, Midnight on the Reservoir (2001), Live at Slim's, San Francisco CA (2003), Living in Between (2004), and Live at the Independent (2004).

They issued their first national release, Taught to Be Proud, in 2005 and within a year they were opening for Gov't Mule, Trey Anastasio, Dave Matthews Band and a host of other lauded musicians. In 2007, longtime bass player Ben Chambers left the band and was replaced by Reed Mathis, formerly of Jacob Fred Jazz Odyssey. Mathis's stylistic versatility on bass proved to be the perfect fit for the band. In 2008, Tea Leaf Green went on to re-release their first three studio albums as the triple-CD compilation entitled Seeds. Later that year the band followed up with their next studio album Raise Up the Tent.

In June 2010 Tea Leaf Green released Looking West, their first studio album in 2 years. The release is a compilation of road-tested, fan favorite songs that the band has never recorded in the studio. The album marks a new chapter for Tea Leaf Green and represents the artistic and individual growth of the band since their formation more than a decade ago.

In a few short years, these road warriors have built a strong following, consistently filling venues across the country and becoming a warmly received, go-to band on the festival circuit with stand-out performances at Bonnaroo, Wakarusa, 10K Lakes, and The Echo Project, among others. Sharing some of the style and substance of musical contemporaries My Morning Jacket, Wolfmother, and the Raconteurs, Tea Leaf Green conjures the spirit of bands like '70s Bob Dylan, Tom Petty, and The Grateful Dead, taking classic sounds and giving them a present-day polish. Tea Leaf Green reminds us at every turn just how alluring rock 'n' roll can be.

All Ages / GA  / $15.00 adv / $18.00 DOS

NOVEMBER 3RD, 2004

- for the Grateful Web

 

I lie next to my secret husband one minute and the next he is the shower running, the lights light then dim under the bathroom door.  I roll over to the time bomb, the telephone, my mother asking if I'm okay, and how are you dealing with your disappointment?  She asks if I've heard from my brother, the desert's phantom son.  I tell her he never did throw his golf clubs after a bad shot or bite the Nintendo controller out of frustration.  She tells me I'm tired.  I tell her I'm sick of seeing the marine layer burn off in the morning only to return in the afternoon.  I tell her this ground is only paper-mâché and glue and homophobia.  She tells me she feels safe now and I love her so I hang up.

 

Emily Crocker

MoveOn.org (February 2004)

- for the Grateful Web
- for the Grateful Web

What is MoveOn all about?
MoveOn is working to bring ordinary people back into politics. With a system that today revolves around big money and big media, most citizens are left out. When it becomes clear that our "representatives" don't represent the public, the foundations of democracy are in peril. MoveOn is a catalyst for a new kind of grassroots involvement, supporting busy but concerned citizens in finding their political voice. Our nationwide network of more than 1,700,000 online activists is one of the most effective and responsive outlets for democratic participation available today.

What does MoveOn do?
When there is a disconnect between broad public opinion and legislative action, MoveOn builds electronic advocacy groups. Examples of such issues are campaign finance, environmental and energy issues, media consolidation, or the Iraq war. Once a group is assembled, MoveOn provides information and tools to help each individual have the greatest possible impact.

How does MY voice count?
At MoveOn, every member has a voice in choosing our shared direction. Using our ActionForum software, you can propose issue priorities and strategies. Others will see and respond to your suggestions, and the most strongly supported ideas will rise to the top. We adopt the issues that rise to the top as our campaign priorities. In 2000, for example, our members chose campaign finance reform and protection of the environment as our two top issues. In 2003, Iraq and media reform rose to the top. We'll also continue take the initiative to organize quick action on other timely issues as they arise.

Who started MoveOn?
MoveOn was started by Joan Blades and Wes Boyd, two Silicon Valley entrepreneurs. Although neither had experience in politics, they shared deep frustration with the partisan warfare in Washington D.C. and the ridiculous waste of our nation's focus at the time of the impeachment mess. On September 18th 1998, they launched an online petition to "Censure President Clinton and Move On to Pressing Issues Facing the Nation." Within days they had hundreds of thousands of individuals signed up, and began looking for ways these voices could be heard.

The MoveOn Peace campaign was founded independently by Eli Pariser, a Maine native and recent graduate of Simon's Rock College of Bard. In the days following September 11th, 2001, he launched an online petition calling for a restrained and multi-lateral response to the attacks, which was quickly signed by more than half a million people. Eli joined forces with MoveOn soon afterward, and is now MoveOnPAC's Executive Director (see www.moveonpac.org).

Who pays for MoveOn?
Because MoveOn.org has only a tiny staff, our basic operating costs are very low. You can support our work with a secure online contribution. Almost all of our funding comes through these donations from people like you.

What is the MoveOn PAC?
Many of our current national leaders actively disregard public opinion and common sense, recklessly placing the interests of their big-money donors ahead of the good of our society. For these politicians, our only alternative is electoral action. It's time for a change in leadership. We need more new talent and new vision. Broadening public support for congressional campaigns will be key in making this possible. Through the MoveOn Political Action Committee, more than 10,000 everyday Americans together contributed more than $2 million to key congressional campaigns in the 2000 election, and more than $3.5 million in 2002 election (more information).

To contact MoveOn.org: click here

Fur is Dead (January 2004)

The fur ads you might see in magazines and commercials portray fur coats as a symbol of elegance. But these ads fail to show how the original owners of these coats met their gruesome deaths.

 

Millions of fur-bearing animals—including foxes, raccoons, minks, coyotes, bobcats, lynxes, opossums, nutria, beavers, muskrats, otters, and others—are killed each year on fur farms by anal and vaginal electrocution and in the wild by drowning, trapping, or beating.

Click on the sections below to read more about each.

A Lifetime in a Cage

Fur Farm Exposé

What We Uncovered on a "Modern" Fur Farm

Foxes in Boxes

Suffering in the Wild

Fur mean, Not "Green"

Fur: A Personal Choice?

"Suffering in the Wild": The Fur Industry & Indigenous Trappers