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San Francisco's BIG LIGHT Announce Summer Tour Dates

San Francisco's Big Light will tour this summer in support of their debut album, Animals In Bloom. The dates mark the furthest the band has pushed outside their hometown in a short three year history. And with good reason. Big Light has made a timeless rock and roll record that demands to be heard beyond the Bay Area. The album's 12 tracks spill over with fuzzed-out guitars, artful lyrical observations and stirring garage pop psychedelia. Hailed as one of the most promising young rock bands in San Francisco, Big Light are now setting their sights on the rest of the country.

Forming circa 2007 as a vehicle for aspiring singer/songwriter/guitarist Fred Torphy to get his songs into the world, BIG LIGHT spent the next three years developing their sound and performing around the West Coast relentlessly. Climbing the S.F. club circuit quickly, they went from playing bar gigs like Bottom of the Hill to headlining The Independent to support slots at the legendary Fillmore sharing bills with the likes of Spoon, Broken Social Scene and Dead Confederate among others. A hit on the festival circuit as well, Big Light has previously performed at Outside Lands, Noise Pop and Wanderlust. On this upcoming tour, they're set for another run of summer festivals, including High Sierra, Summer Camp and Bobolink.

With its debut album, Animals In Bloom, Big Light has crafted a record that has enough indie pop charm to land on the radio, but is adventurous enough to engage those who are looking for more than hooks. Headphone junkies and audiophiles themselves, they've created a "listening experience" that never feels fake or dishonest. Experiencing the new album and watching the band evolve at such a rapid rate onstage, one gets the feeling that Big Light is poised to shine bright for years to come.

Upcoming BIG LIGHT tour dates are:

May 29 | Summer Camp Music Festival | Chilicothe, IL
May 30 | Beat Kitchen | Chicago, IL (w/ Van Ghost)
June 3 | Starry Plough | Berkeley, CA (w/ Nathan Moore)
June 4 | Cater Ranch Music Festival | Bootjack, CA
June 5 & 6 | Bobolink Music Festival | Belden, CA
June 11 | TBD | Providence, RI
June 10 | The Saint | Asbury Park, NJ
June 11 | Brooklyn Bowl | New York, NY (w/ Rotary Downs)
June 12th | Middle East | Boston, MA (w/ Holly Golightly)
June 16th | Humboldt Brew | Arcata, CA (w/ Wendy Darling)
June 17th | High Dive | Seattle, WA (w/ Wendy Darling)
June 18th | Mississippi Studios | Portland, OR (w/ Wendy Darling)
June 19th | Gem State Jam | Boise, ID
July 1-4 | High Sierra Music Festival | Quincy, CA
August 4th | Independent | San Francisco, CA (w/ Apollo Sunshine)
August 26th | Rocks off Boat Cruise| New York, NY (w/ American Babies)

The Dig: May Tour Dates With The Joy Formidable

On the heels of tours with both Editors and The Antlers, and Portugal. The Man and Port O'Brien, New York City's fast rising up-and-comers The Dig have announced new May dates in support of The Joy Formidable. The band will first perform at the inaugural Truck America festival at the Full Moon Resort in Big Indian, NY, on April 30th before embarking on their week-long trip with the UK band. The tour will begin May 1st at a sold-out show at the Mercury Lounge in The Dig's hometown and will end May 8th in Albany, NY, at Jillian's.


Having recently inked a distribution deal with Megaforce, The Dig's debut album Electric Toys - recorded this past summer with producer Bryce Goggin (Pavement, Antony & the Johnsons, The Ramones, Bishop Allen) - will now be released June 8th. This evening, meanwhile, viewers can tune in to NBC's new drama Trauma to hear a preview of the album's slow-build-to-burn opener "Carry Me Home," which will be featured on tonight's episode (9pm EST/8pm CST). This is the second primetime song placement for the young band: album track "Look Inside" was featured on The CW's The Vampire Diaries in January. Multiple tracks can currently be heard on the band's MySpace page, while "You're Already Gone" can be downloaded here.


The Dig's summer touring plans will be announced soon.


The Dig tour dates:

APR. 30 BIG INDIAN, NY TRUCK AMERICA (Full Moon Resort)

MAY 1 NEW YORK, NY MERCURY LOUNGE (SOLD OUT)*

MAY 4 TORONTO, ON HORSESHOE TAVERN*

MAY 5 MONTREAL, QC THE GREEN ROOM*

MAY 6 BOSTON, MA HARPER'S FERRY*

MAY 7 PHILADELPHIA, PA KUNG FU NECKTIE*

MAY 8 ALBANY, NY JILLIAN'S*

* with The Joy Formidable

The Dig is: David Baldwin (guitar, vocals), Emile Mosseri (bass, vocals), Erick Eiser (keys, guitar), and Jamie Alegre (drums).

National Jazz Museum in Harlem Events, March, 2010

In March 2010, the National Jazz Museum in Harlem presents public programming that brings jazz fans closer to artists—emerging to living masters—that embody the art form that defines America to itself and to the world.

Our live performance series, Harlem in the Himalayas, features three forward-thinking musical leaders grounded in the lessons of their forebears, yet who are only bound by the limits of their imaginations. Come see the boundless future their music beholds at the Rubin Museum of Art.

Come engage in conversation with Terry Teachout, author of a celebrated new bio of Louis Armstrong, at Jazz for Curious Readers, and find out details on the controversial 2009 Wall Street Journal article in which he lamented the declining audience for jazz.


Harlem Speaks, our flagship series, features recent NEA Jazz Master awardee Kenny Barron and trombonist Dick Griffin, whose career encompasses all from mainstream jazz to the avant-garde.

Art Blakey, the drum master who led one of the premier jazz ensembles of the 20th century, is the sole focus of our month long Jazz for Curious Listeners (JCL) series and a special Saturday panel discussion. Museum co-director Christian McBride will lead two of the free JCL sessions, and will spearhead a tribute to Herbie Hancock at Stanford University in California as well.

Come to listen, learn, engage and swing!

Tuesday, March 2, 2010

Jazz for Curious Listeners The Big Beat: Art Blakey
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Art Blakey is undoubtedly one of the most influential and beloved percussionists and band leaders in the history of the music called jazz, his signature rolls and bandstand power accentuating the bandstands of countless groups as a sideman, and as leader of Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers.

The Jazz Messengers was a major incubator for young talent. A list of the band's alumni is a who's who of straight-ahead jazz from the '50s on – Lee Morgan, Wayne Shorter, Freddie Hubbard, Johnny Griffin, Jackie McLean, Donald Byrd, Bobby Timmons, Cedar Walton, Benny Golson, Joanne Brackeen, Billy Harper, Valery Ponomarev, Bill Pierce, Branford Marsalis, James Williams, and Chuck Mangione, to name only a few. In the '80s, precocious graduates of Blakey's School for Swing would continue to number among the movers and shakers in jazz, foremost among them trumpeter Wynton Marsalis, who became the most visible symbol of the '80s jazz mainstream; through him, Blakey's swingin’ ideals came to dominate the public's perception of the music. At the time of Blakey's death in 1990, the Messenger aesthetic dominated jazz, and Blakey himself had arguably become the most influential jazz musician of the past 20 years.

Monday, March 8, 2010

Jazz for Curious ReadersTerry Teachout
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Terry Teachout is a critic, biographer, blogger, and drama critic of The Wall Street Journal, the music critic of Commentary, and the author of Sightings, a column about the arts in America that appears biweekly in the Saturday Wall Street Journal.

And most significantly for tonight, Mr. Teachout is the author of the acclaimed new biography of the Father of Jazz: Pops: A Life of Louis Armstrong.

He blogs at About Last Night along with Chicago-based critic Laura Demanski (who writes under the name "Our Girl in Chicago"), contributes a weekly book-review column and a monthly videoblog to Contentions, the Commentary blog, and has written about the arts for many other magazines and newspapers, including the New York Times and National Review.

Teachout grew up in Sikeston, Missouri. He attended St. John's College in Annapolis, Maryland; William Jewell College in Liberty, Missouri, where he received his B.S. in music journalism; and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He lived in Kansas City from 1975 to 1983, working as a jazz bassist and a music critic for the Kansas City Star. He moved to New York City in 1985, working as an editor at Harper's Magazine (1985-87) and an editorial writer for the New York Daily News (1987-93) and as the News' classical music and dance critic (1993-2000). In 2004 he was appointed by President Bush to the National Council on the Arts, the advisory and review panel of the National Endowment for the Arts.

Teachout is the author of All in the Dances: A Brief Life of George Balanchine (2004, Harcourt), A Terry Teachout Reader (2004, Yale University Press), The Skeptic: A Life of H.L. Mencken (2002, HarperCollins), and City Limits: Memories of a Small-Town Boy (1991, Poseidon Press).

He is the editor of Beyond the Boom: New Voices on American Life, Culture, and Politics (1990, Poseidon, introduction by Tom Wolfe) and Ghosts on the Roof: Selected Journalism of Whittaker Chambers, 1931-1959 (1989, Regnery Gateway). In 1992 he rediscovered the manuscript of A Second Mencken Chrestomathy among H.L. Mencken's private papers and edited it for publication by Alfred A. Knopf (1995). He wrote the forewords to Paul Taylor's Private Domain: An Autobiography (1999, University of Pittsburgh Press), Elaine Dundy's The Dud Avocado (2007, New York Review Books), and William Bailey's William Bailey on Canvas (2007, Betty Cuningham Gallery) and contributed to The Oxford Companion to Jazz (2000, Oxford University Press). He has written liner notes for CDs by Karrin Allyson, Gene Bertoncini, Ruby Braff and Ellis Larkins, Chanticleer, Julia Dollison, Jim Ferguson, Diana Krall, the Lascivious Biddies, Joe Mooney, Marian McPartland, Mike Metheny, Maria Schneider, Nickel Creek, Kendra Shank, Luciana Souza, and the Trio Solisti.

Tuesday, March 9, 2010

Jazz for Curious Listeners The Big Beat: Art Blakey,
THE BANDLEADER
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Art Blakey's first musical education came in the form of piano lessons; he was playing professionally as a seventh grader, leading his own commercial band. He switched to drums shortly thereafter, learning to play in the hard-swinging style of Chick Webb and Sid Catlett. In 1942, he played with pianist Mary Lou Williams in New York. He toured the South with Fletcher Henderson's band in 1943-1944. From there, he briefly led a Boston-based big band before joining Billy Eckstine's new group, with which he would remain from 1944-1947. Eckstine's big band was the famous "cradle of modern jazz," and included (at different times) such major figures of the forthcoming bebop revolution as Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis, and Charlie Parker. When Eckstine's group disbanded, Blakey started a rehearsal ensemble called the Seventeen Messengers. He also recorded with an octet, the first of his bands to be called the Jazz Messengers.

Thursday, March 11, 2010

Harlem Speaks Kenny Barron, Pianist
6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

According to writer Arwulf Arwulf (from whom this bio is adapted), a thorough examination of Kenny Barron's musical accomplishments over a span of 50 years requires a discography of more than 200 pages. That's because in addition to a distinguished career as soloist and leader he has served as one of the most dependable sidemen in all of post-bop mainstream modern jazz. More than 40 albums have appeared under his name, and his presence on literally hundreds of recordings by other musicians paints a panoramic picture of Kenny Barron's lifelong devotion to the music.

Born in Philadelphia, PA, on June 9, 1943, he took on the piano at the age of 12, with a little help from Ray Bryant's sister, known today as the mother of guitarist Kevin Eubanks. Three years later, on the recommendation of his own big brother, saxophonist Bill Barron (1927-1989), he joined Mel Melvin's rhythm & blues band. The aspiring pianist gained more experience while working with drummer Philly Joe Jones, saxophonist Jimmy Heath and multi-instrumentalist Yusef Lateef in Detroit. Lateef's album The Centaur and the Phoenix (1960) was Kenny Barron's first modern jazz recording project, though not as a performer (Joe Zawinul was the pianist on this date) but as composer and arranger.

His recording debut as an improvising artist took place shortly after he moved to New York in 1961 and cut the first of many albums with his brother, who often aligned himself with two graduates of the Charles Mingus Jazz Workshop, trumpeter Ted Curson and saxophonist Booker Ervin. A session in 1962 found Barron working with trumpeter Dave Burns, one-time member of sax and flute man James Moody's exciting bop orchestra. Moody himself played an important role in Barron's career, first hiring him to perform at the Village Vanguard, then bringing him into Dizzy Gillespie's band. Barron stuck with Diz and Moody until 1966, performing at clubs and festivals on both coasts and touring through France and England.

Kenny Barron's first great year of independent recording activity was 1967. In addition to co-leading a band with trumpeter Jimmy Owens, the pianist made records with trumpeter Freddie Hubbard and saxophonists Joe Henderson, Stanley Turrentine, Booker Ervin, and Eric Kloss. Barron seldom recorded with anyone just once. Examples of artists who made many records with Barron during the 1970s are  Moody and Lateef, and bassists Ron Carter and Buster Williams, and others such as Marvin "Hannibal" Peterson. Barron also worked regularly with saxophonists Chico and Von Freeman, John Stubblefield, Nick Brignola, and Stan Getz (with whom he toured extensively during Getz's twilight years). The stylistic range continued to widen as Barron sat in with violinists Michal Urbaniak and John Blake, drummer Elvin Jones, and singing trombonist Ray Anderson.

During the '80s, Kenny Barron played piano in the score for Spike Lee's film Do the Right Thing, appeared on multi-performer tribute albums honoring composers Nino Rota and Thelonious Monk, and became a founding member (with Charlie Rouse, Buster Williams, and Ben Riley) of the definitive Monk legacy band, known as Sphere.

A respected educator who has taught at Rutgers, Juilliard, and the Manhattan School of Music, Kenny Barron continues to create music of exceptionally high quality and substantial depth, something he has done for half a century, whether using the Fender Rhodes electromechanical keyboard, a plugged-in harpsichord, a synthesizer, or his lifelong companion, that fundamental jazz instrument, the piano.

In January 2010 Barron was one of the esteemed recipients of the NEA Jazz Master’s honor, conferring an official recognition of what Barron’s fans have already known for 40 years. Come hear an musical master speak of his life and times in the art of jazz.

Friday, March 12, 2010

Harlem in the Himalayas Jaleel Shaw
7:00pm
Location: Rubin Museum of Art
(150 West 17th Street)
$18 in advance | $20 at door |
Box Office: 212-620-5000 ext. 344

Jaleel Shaw, alto saxophone
Dwayne Burno, acoustic bass
Otis Brown III, drums

One of the most thrilling young alto saxophonists on the jazz scene, Jaleel Shaw holds down the alto chair in the small ensemble of none other than the great Roy Haynes. Tonight see and hear him as he fronts his own band!

Jaleel Shaw grew up in Philadelphia, PA, where he studied with saxophone instructors Rayburn Wright and Robert Landham. As a teen, Jaleel performed, jammed and sat in at the many clubs in Philadelphia, honing his chops and developing strong relationships with the many great musicians there as well as the musicians that came to Philly from New York City.

Upon graduating from high school, Jaleel received a full tuition scholarship to the Berklee College of Music in Boston, Mass, where he attended for four years and earned a dual degree in Music Education and Performance (in 2000). While attending Berklee, Jaleel studied privately with saxophonists Andy Mcghee, Billy Pierce, George Garzone, and Shanon LeClaire.

After graduating from Berklee, Jaleel attended the Manhattan School of Music in New York City, where he received his Masters in Jazz Performance in May 2002. During his time at the MSM, Jaleel was recruited by both the Mingus Big Band and Count Basie Orchestra. Jaleel appears on two Grammy Nominated CDs by the Mingus Big Band - "Tonight at Noon" and "I Am Three."

A year after finishing his graduate studies, Jaleel joined Temple University as a part-time private lesson and ensemble instructor, and soon thereafter began giving private saxophone lessons at The New School.

After being in New York for five years, Jaleel's debut CD "Perspective" was released in June 2005 to rave reviews. It was named one of the top 5 debut CDs of 2005 by All About Jazz and the Jazz Journalists Association. In the fall of 2005, Jaleel joined world renown drummer Roy Haynes' Quartet and recorded the Grammy nominated CD "Whereas" with the group for the Dreyfus Label.

In the beginning of 2008, Jaleel launched his own record label (Changu Records), on which he released his second CD – "Optimism." Today Jaleel continues to perform primarily in three groups - The Roy Haynes Quartet, the Mingus Big Band, and his own quartet and quintet.

Saturday, March 13, 2010

Saturday Panels
Orgy in Rhythm: An In-Depth Look and Listen to Art Blakey
7:30 – 9:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers served as a traveling finishing school for countless jazz musicians who later led their own groups and became composers and arrangers of note. Today, meet some of the alumni of the Messengers, and see film footage of Blakey in action as a drummer, band leader, and teacher.

Tuesday, March 16, 2010
Jazz for Curious Listeners
The Big Beat: Art Blakey
ALUMNI REUNION 7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

With Christian McBride

Christian McBride, co-director of the National Jazz Museum in Harlem, will host alumni of the Blakey band in an evening not to be missed. The spirit of Blakey will be summoned!   

Friday, March 19, 2010

Harlem in the Himalayas
Ambrose Akinmusire
7:00pm
Location: Rubin Museum of Art
(150 West 17th Street)
$18 in advance | $20 at door |
Box Office: 212-620-5000 ext. 344

Ambrose’s conceptual extension into a new musical language never excludes beauty. As one who listens intently, he values the fertility of a pause, of communication, of tension. Ambrose began conceptualizing early as a musician, theorizing and experimenting as a catalyst for development. He seeks other genres of music to analyze and expose, drawing inspiration from musicians ranging from Bjork to Chopin.

Before he was eighteen, Ambrose had already performed with such famed musicians as Joe Henderson, Joshua Redman, Steve Coleman, and Billy Higgins. After graduating Berkeley High School, he moved to New York to begin a scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music, studying with Vincent Pinzerella from the New York Philharmonic, Dick Oatts, Lew Soloff, and Laurie Frink.

Ambrose is a recent graduate of the Masters program at USC, and also the Monk Institute, where Ambrose’s instructors included Terence Blanchard, Billy Childs and Gary Grant. In the past several years, he has worked with such artists as Jimmy Heath, Jason Moran, Hal Crook, Bob Hurst, Terri Lynne Carrington, Ron Carter, and Wallace Roney, Herbie Hancock and Wayne Shorter. So it should come as little or no surprise that Ambrose was the winner of both the 2007 Carmine Caruso International Jazz Trumpet Solo Competition and 2007 Thelonious Monk International Jazz Competition.

Tuesday, March 23, 2010

Jazz for Curious Listeners                               
The Big Beat: Art Blakey                                                                                 THE EARLY YEARS: with Fletcher Henderson, Thelonious Monk and Billy Eckstine

7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Art Blakey's first musical education came in the form of piano lessons; he was playing professionally as a seventh grader, leading his own commercial band. He switched to drums shortly thereafter, learning to play in the hard-swinging style of Chick Webb and Sid Catlett. In 1942, he played with pianist Mary Lou Williams in New York. He toured the South with Fletcher Henderson's band in 1943-1944. From there, he briefly led a Boston-based big band before joining Billy Eckstine's new group, with which he would remain from 1944-1947. Eckstine's big band was the famous "cradle of modern jazz," and included (at different times) such major figures of the forthcoming bebop revolution as Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis, and Charlie Parker. When Eckstine's group disbanded, Blakey started a rehearsal ensemble called the Seventeen Messengers. He also recorded with an octet, the first of his bands to be called the Jazz Messengers.

Thursday, March 25, 2010

Harlem Speaks
Dick Griffin, Trombonist
6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

In a career spanning over 30 years, Dick Griffin has performed with some of the biggest names in Jazz and Soul, and has appeared with several symphony orchestras as well. A short list of the luminaries Mr. Griffin has worked with includes: Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Ella Fitzgerald, Tito Puente, Art Blakey, Charles Mingus, Dizzy Gillespie, McCoy Tyner, Marvin Gaye, Michael Jackson, Isaac Hayes, Dionne Warwick, and Lionel Hampton.

Griffin has developed a highly personalized playing style which he calls "circularphonics," a technique that combines the playing of chords on trombone with circular breathing. The expanded range of sounds Griffin creates through his multiphonic technique at times evokes the spirit of such experimental artists as John Coltrane, Rahsaan Roland Kirk, and Sun Ra. Never a follower, however, Griffin has developed a unique style on and for the trombone that goes beyond the influence of even those great musicians.

James Richard Griffin was born and reared in Jackson, Mississippi. His first musical influence was a neighbor known simply as Mr. Jesse. At evening time, all the neighborhood children would stop by to hear Mr. Jesse's impromptu blues guitar compositions with lyrics describing the day's events in rhyme. Griffin began studying piano at age 11 and upon entering high school two years later joined the school's marching band where he learned trombone. His professional career began as a teenager, playing piano and trombone in clubs with drummer classmate Freddie Waits. While in high school he also sang in a doo-wop group which was invited to go on the road and perform with Sam Cooke. In junior college, Griffin won several awards for his arranging skills. In 1963, Griffin graduated from Jackson State University and then pursued graduate studies at Indiana University where he received a Masters Degree in Music Education and Trombone.

It was in Chicago, though, where Griffin met avant-garde jazz giant Sun Ra, that his professional career seriously took off. He spent several summers in the mid-1960s playing with Sun Ra's Arkestra. It was during this period that Griffin first met Rahsaan Roland Kirk, who became a close friend. After moving to New York City in 1967, Griffin made his recording debut with Kirk on the album "The Inflated Tear." As a member of the "Vibration Society," Griffin notated and transcribed music for the sightless Kirk. He went on to record several albums with Kirk, including "Prepare Thyself To Deal With A Miracle," "Rahsaan, Rahsaan," "Left & Right," and "Volunteered Slavery." In the early 1970s, Griffin also played in a big band fronted by the great bassist and composer Charles Mingus. During this year-long association, Mingus provided priceless support by encouraging the young trombonist's writing endeavors. Griffin also spent three years in the house band of the legendary Apollo Theater in Harlem, playing for nearly all the Motown greats, including The Temptations, James Brown and Nancy Wilson.

In 1974, Griffin released his debut album as a leader, "The Eighth Wonder," for Strata-East Records, one of the most successful independent jazz labels of that period. Later, he released "Now Is The Time: The Multiphonic Tribe" for Trident Records. During this period, he also taught music theory and the history of Jazz at Wesleyan University (1975-77) and later at SUNY-Old Westbury (1981-83). In the 1980s, Griffin's career encompassed performances in a wide variety of settings with his own group and with others. As a sideman, Griffin performed with some of the best big band musicians of the time—Benny Bailey, Jimmy Heath, Frank Foster, and Slide Hampton—at the 1980 Winter Olympics in Lake Placid, New York. Later in the decade, Griffin toured and recorded with the internationally-renowned ensemble "Ekaya," led by South African pianist Abdullah Ibrahim (f/k/a Dollar Brand).

As a composer, Griffin completed the "World Vibration Suite," a work for symphony orchestra premiered by the Brooklyn Philharmonic. In 1986, his third album "A Dream For Rahsaan," was released by Ruby Records to critical acclaim. This inspired him to adapt the album for a symphony orchestra and three saxophones, which was the format he had previously employed for the "World Vibration Suite." During the 1990s, he performed in over a dozen international Jazz festivals, both as a leader and in the bands of such diverse talents as Illinois Jacquet, Sun Ra, Charles Gayle, Hilton Ruiz, and Lionel Hampton. Along with such notable artists as Dizzy Gillespie and Sonny Rollins, Griffin appeared in the Heineken Jazz Festival in Rotterdam and, in 1991, he traveled to Canada to headline Ottawa's International Jazz Festival. The German label, Konnex Records, re-released Griffin's first and third albums in 1994 with additional tracks. Griffin then released "All Blues," his fourth album (on Amasaya Records), which features he novel lineup of trombone, organ, guitar, and drums. In addition to the title track by Miles Davis, Griffin performs five originals plus tunes by Ellington, Horace Silver, and Hampton Hawes, paying tribute to the blues environment in which he was nurtured.

One of the most versatile and inventive musicians of today, Griffin has played with symphony orchestras such as The Harlem Philharmonic and The Symphony Of The New World, and has performed in several Broadway shows including "The Wiz," "Me & Bessie," "Raisin," and "Lena" (starring Lena Horne), as well as in the Paris production of "Black & Blue" (starring Linda Hopkins). He has made many television appearances in the U.S. on shows such as "The Today Show", "Soul", "Faces", "The Ed Sullivan Show", and "Like It Is". He also has appeared in the UK on the BBC and on TV programs in Germany, France, and Italy. Finally, he also appeared in the film "The Cotton Club" and performed on the soundtrack for the movie "Gordon's War".

During the past few years, Griffin has performed more extensively with his own group, the Dick Griffin Organ Ensemble, and he also played at the Uncool Jazz Festival in Switzerland with Charles Gayle in 2001. Griffin has also continued to devote his time to his artwork. His abstract paintings and works on paper have been featured in numerous solo and group exhibitions, private and corporate collections in both the U.S. and Europe. Some of his early pieces grace the covers of each of his four CDs.

Tonight you can witness an artist not beholden to genre labels and engage in discussion with him during the audience Q&A portion of the evening.

Friday, March 26, 2010

Harlem in the Himalayas
Luis Bonilla
7:00pm
Location: Rubin Museum of Art
(150 West 17th Street)
$18 in advance | $20 at door |
Box Office: 212-620-5000 ext. 344

If ever an artist could be called an octopus, Luis Bonilla is it. The California raised, Costa Rican trombonist, composer and arranger has sought out, taken in and mastered an incredible array of musical styles. His success as a sideman with such greats as McCoy Tyner, Dizzy Gillespie, Lester Bowie, Tom Harrell, Freddie Hubbard, Astrud Gilberto, Willie Colon and Toshiko Akiyoshi attests not only to the skill and variety of Bonilla’s talent, but also to a mind restlessly committed to exploring some of the most complex and demanding music of our time.

Yet there is nothing rarefied about the Bonilla experience. He has worked as a studio musician with Tony Bennett, Marc Anthony, La India and Mary J. Blige and understands and exploits the liveliness of pop as well as the rhythmic sway and punch of Latin Jazz. Currently a member of the Vanguard Jazz Orchestra, the Afro-Latin Jazz Orchestra under Arturo O’Farrill’s direction  (both 2009 Grammy winners) and Dave Douglas’s latest group (Dave Douglas & Brass Ecstasy), Bonilla is one of those rare artists whose work is always expanding, taking in more and more while remaining singular and focused: “Bonilla may be a trombonist used to handling that big long sliding thing, but when it comes to execution of his ideas, he lets nothing slide” (All About Jazz).

Critics praised his first two albums on the Candid label, Pasos Gigantes (1998) and iEscucha! (2000), acknowledging Bonilla’s ability to give voice to radically different musical sensibilities with an ease and seamlessness that belies the rigor and sophistication of the music. Pasos Gigantes made Jazziz’s top ten Latin list of 1998. Even as early as these first two albums, critics noted Bonilla’s leadership and sophisticated use of tonal colors. As a faculty member at both Temple University and Manhattan School of Music, Bonilla has an intuitive sense in how to bring out the best in those working with him. Listen to any of his albums and you will hear an extraordinary level of trust and inspiration in each band member’s playing. As the critic for All About Jazz noticed, “Bonilla gives his colleagues ample space to breathe, adding momentum to the flow of his compositional ideas.”

His next album, 2007’s Terminal Clarity was a celebration, reflection and aesthetic extension of his years working with Lester Bowie. While retaining the brash harmonic structures of his mentor’s work from Brass Fantasy to his earlier and justly famous work with the Art Ensemble of Chicago, Bonilla adds a “contagious exuberance” (Jazzwise magazine) that is at the heart of his artistic vision. Without in any way diminishing Bowie’s audacity, Bonilla manages to balance “the cerebral and the down-and-dirty (Jazz Times), taking “bold steps to merge Latin genres, free jazz and a variety of other influences" (Latin Jazz Corner).

In Bonilla’s latest album, I Talking Now! (2009), he pushes these disjunctions even harder, politely demanding that we feel connections between wildly disparate styles of music. A heady mix of swing, rock, free jazz, funk, movie soundtracks, avant-garde noise and ballads, I Talking Now, for all its musical diversity, speaks with one voice. It is a distinctly American vision, a gentle craziness that suggests that every one and every sound can co-exist if we just keep on taking in more and more. Luis Bonilla is moving in directions that are expanding our notions of jazz and leading us into startling new realms with “remarkable creativity and versatility” (Newsday).

Tuesday, March 30, 2010
Christian McBride/Loren Schoenberg Duo/Informance
at Stanford University's Community School for Music and Arts, Mountain View

Tuesday, March 30, 2010 | 6:00 pm

Community School for Music and Arts, Mountain View

The annual duo concert/lecture by the NJMH’s dynamic directors!
ALSO – SAME NIGHT: Jazz for Curious Listeners
The Big Beat:
Art Blakey  FILM NIGHT

7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Don’t miss this free session with one of the world’s best bass instrumentalists sharing his views on, and selections by, Art Blakey, in this last of a month-long series of events focused on the man affectionately called “Buhaina.”

Wednesday, March 31, 2010

A TRIBUTE TO HERBIE HANCOCK: CHRISTIAN McBRIDE AND FRIENDS

Wednesday, March 31, 2010 | 8:00 pm
Stanford University's Dinkelspiel Auditorium

$34–38 (Adult) | $10 (Stanford Student)
$31–35 (Other Student)
$17–19 (Youth Under 18)
In a concert curated by the National Jazz Museum in Harlem (NJMH), museum co-director and bass phenom Christian McBride leads a tribute to the legacy of pioneering jazz composer/keyboardist Herbie Hancock. McBride has long embraced electric jazz, funk, and soul music as a vibrant part of the jazz mainstream. Here, he leads his versatile band through Hancock’s incredible body of work, from his years as a Miles Davis sideman and Blue Note Records solo artist in the 1960s, through his groundbreaking Headhunters fusion project in the ’70s, to his work with pop vocalists and producers in the ’80s and ’90s, and his current interest in young hip hop and techno artists. The concert is the culmination of a season of free public programs on jazz and technology, and a continuation of Lively Arts’ collaboration with NJMH and the Stanford Jazz Workshop, revisiting classic jazz repertoire from a fresh perspective.

***note: the JAZZ AT THE DWYER with Etienne Charles and his Trinidadian Jazz Band will occur on APRIL 23rd, not MARCH 23 as listed on our mailing card.

Terese Genecco & Her Little Big Band

MAC and Bistro Award Winning singer, band leader, and comedienne Terese Genecco & Her Little Big Band will play the Iridium Jazz Club in NYC on Tuesday, November 24th, 2009.  Her band features: Grammy Award Winner LEW SOLOFF on trumpet with EMEDIN RIVERA on Latin Percussion and TOM HUBBARD, who is just returning from Liza Minelli's Australia tour, on Bass also with Barry Levitt on Piano, Sean Harkness on Guitar, Joe Abba on Drums, Cliff Lyons on Tenor Sax and Mark Miller on Trombone.

Big Band Tuesdays
Iridium Jazz Club 1650 Broadway (51st)
www.iridiumjazzclub.com 212-582-2121 or www.ticketweb.com

MAC and Bistro Award Winning singer/band leader/comedienne...
Terese Genecco & Her Little Big Band

Lotus and Big Gigantic Swap Remixes

In the midst of issuing a pair of new EP's (Feather on Wood and Oil on Glass) and also in the midst of a full-on tour, instrumental electronic band Lotus - have found themselves part of an interesting remix project. Lotus member Jesse Miller has remixed a track of Big Gigantic (an alias for Motet saxophonist/producer Dominic Lalli and drummer Jeremy Salken), "Thinking Out Loud," off of the album ‘Fire It Up,' while Lalli returns the favor, remixing the Lotus track, "Simian," off ‘Oil on Glass.'

"Dom's compositions always feature strong melodies, so I wanted to keep that element mostly in tact for this remix while using a different tempo and beat than the original," explains Miller. "I spent a day bouncing tracks to an old 4-track tape machine to get some analog grit and manual EQing on the mix, hence the Cassette moniker in the title."

These two exclusive remixes can be streamed online or download here. Downloads can be in MP3 format or other formats - including full quality .wav files - and fans will set their own price for the downloads. All proceeds will be donated to Musicopia. Musicopia is a non-profit organization that brings educational music enrichment programs to schools and communities throughout the Delaware Valley.

In addition to this Lotus/Big Gigantic cross-pollination on these two aforementioned remix tracks, both bands will be touring together in November for several shows - see the list of dates below. What better way to get prepared for these upcoming shows than to check out these beat-heavy remixes.

For their epic fall tour, Lotus broke new ground in a way that no other rock band has done prior, it allowed their legion of fans to pay-what-they-want for tickets. The Pay-What-You-Want-Tour featuring Lotus was an eight night run of shows in western U.S. states, sponsored by Ticketweb, that let the fans decide how much their show ticket would cost. At the $15.00 Pay-What-You-Want level or higher, fans received free digital downloads of Feather on Wood and Oil on Glass. The Pay-What-You-Want-Tour was part of a larger fall tour that still finds Lotus crisscrossing the United States.  In addition, Lotus recently announced a New Year's eve run in Pennsylvania that will culminate with an epic New Year's Eve Show with MSTRKRFT at Philadelphia's Electric Factory. Leading up to the big night, the band will stop at Mr. Smalls Theatre (Pittsburgh, PA) on 12/29 and The Note (West Chester, PA) on 12/30, both with support act Tigersapien.

The list of remaining dates on Lotus' fall tour, including plays with Big Gigantic, is as follows:

November 5-6 Paradise Rock Club Boston MA w/The Egg
November 7 Revolution Hall Troy NY w/Tigerspapien.
November 10 Is Venue Charlottesville  VA w/Big Gigantic
November 11 Cat's Cradle Carrboro NC w/Big Gigantic
November 12 Variety Playhouse Atlanta  GA w/Big Gigantic
November 13 Bear Creek Music and Arts Festival, Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park Live Oak FL
November 14 Orange Peel Asheville NC w/Big Gigantic
November 27 Vic Theatre Chicago IL w/ The Hood Internet
November 28 Terminal 5 New York NY w/RJD2, Junior Boys (DJ Set)
December 29 Mr. Small's Theatre Millvale PA w/ Tigersapien.
December 30 The Note West Chester PA w/ Tigersapien.
December 31 Electric Factory Philadelphia PA w/MSTRKRFT
January 3-8 Jam Cruise

For more information, visit: www.lotusvibes.com

Big Sam's Funky Nation & Sullivan Hall

Big Sam's Funky Nation had an amazing Halloween weekend & the party's not over yet! Put on your dancin' shoes, BSFN is making their way back to New York for a night of pure, booty-shaking funk this Friday, November 6th.
Recently awarded the Big Easy Music Award for "Best Funk Group of 2008," Big Sam's Funky Nation is a driving force of urban funk. The band is led by trombone powerhouse, Big Sam Williams, formerly the trombonist for the Dirty Dozen Brass Band, who the San Francisco Chronicle calls "the top man on the slide trombone in the birthplace of jazz." Combining his distinctive trombone riffs with a call-and-response MC style, Big Sam refuses to let the audience sit still. Between the band's solos and his trombone riffs, Big Sam second-lines (a uniquely New Orleans style of street-dance) and gets the crowd going. Big Sam's Funky Nation is not a one man show; the members of the Funky Nation, a group of well trained and experienced musicians with impressive credentials of their own, meet the challenges of their funky band leader. BSFN masterfully combines a rock sensibility with improv-style associated with jazz and the horn-heavy front section that's the hallmark of big band funk. The energy level is high voltage when this band takes the stage, and as Jambase Online proclaims, "as long as groups like Big Sam's Funky Nation helm communal happenings like this one the funky fever is bound to spread."
Kicking the night off will be the Honey Island Swamp Band. Come out and show your love at the upcoming Big Sam's Funky Nation show at Sullivan Hall--you'll be sure to Shake Yo Thang!

DATE: Friday, November 6th TIME:  10:30pm

Christian McBride Big Band at the Iridium

mcbrideThe Iridium Jazz Club Is Pleased to Present

A Very Special One Week Engagement

With The

CHRISTIAN MCBRIDE BIG BAND

WED. THRU SUN. SEPT. 16-20, 2009

Featuring

CHRISTIAN MCBRIDE-LEADER

DAVID BRYANT - PIANO
ULYSSES OWENS, JR. - DRUMS
BEN WILLIAMS - BASS

TRUMPETS:
FREDDIE HENDRIX, FRANK GREENE, BRANDON LEE, KENNY RAMPTON

TROMBONE:
STEVE DAVIS, DOUGLAS PURVIANCE, + 2 TBS TBA

REEDS:
STEVE WILSON, LOREN SCHOENBERG, TODD WILLIAMS, TODD BASHORE, FRANK BASILE

 

Co-director of the National Jazz Museum in Harlem, bassist, educator, composer, super-sideman, and bandleader Christian McBride brings his 18 piece big band to The Iridium Jazz Club for five nights Sept. 16 through 20 sets at 8:30 & 10:30PM. From Philadelphia, McBride has become the most acclaimed acoustic and electric bassist to emerge from the jazz world in the past decade. His CDs on Verve and Mack Ave. as a leader and the literally hundreds of albums he has performed on showcase his funky style and big tone. His ever-expanding pop, R&B and fusion palette takes him around the world anchoring some of the best jazz groups today. He has performed with numerous artists including at Pat Metheny, Joshua Redman, Sting, Chick Corea, The Roots, Diana Krall, D'Angelo, Betty Carter, McCoy Tyner, Roy Hargrove and Wynton Marsalis.

 

 

IRIDIUM JAZZ CLUB
1650 BROADWAY (CORNER OF 51ST)
NEW YORK, NY 10023
RESERVATIONS: 212-582-2121
HTTP://WWW.IRIDIUMJAZZCLUB.COM/
SETS AT 8:30 & 10:30PM

Let Out a Big Howl for Wolves: Stop Open Fire Orders

In just a few weeks, the mass killing of wolves could begin in Idaho and Montana -- and not even newborn wolf pups and their nursing mothers will be spared.

We cannot stand by while this slaughter unfolds. On May 4, the wolf's federal protection will be lifted, and government agents will be free to open fire. After that, the states will launch public hunts, targeting wolves.

We must act now to call off the guns!

That's why NRDC is launching The Big Howl campaign to mobilize Americans everywhere to protect wolves in the Northern Rockies from the crossfire.

Add your voice now to our campaign. Tell Interior Secretary Salazar to reverse his decision to kick wolves off the endangered species list.

This is absolutely the wrong time to rip away federal protections from these struggling wolves. Over the past year, the wolf population in Yellowstone National Park has declined by 27 percent, with more than 70 percent of wolf pups succumbing to disease.

One pack alone lost all 24 of its pups!

If the federal protections are lifted on May 4 as planned, newborn wolf pups and their nursing mothers traveling outside national parks will be in the line of fire.

That's why NRDC and our partners are filing suit in federal court to block this disastrous policy. But we must do more: we must raise a nationwide outcry that the Obama Administration cannot ignore.

And so we're calling on everyone who cares about wolves to take part in The Big Howl campaign.

Please call on the Interior Department to go back to the drawing board and submit this cruel plan to the kind of rigorous scientific review the Obama Administration has promised.

Because you have always stood up for wildlife, I'm contacting you first to take part in The Big Howl campaign.

After you send your own message, I will let you know about an easy way to spread the word to your friends and family. We need at least one million messages to save the wolves -- so get ready to rally your friends and family to add their own voices to The Big Howl.

Tiësto wins big in IDMA Awards & headlines Ultra Music Festival in Miami

"It's Tiësto Time" was the headline of NBC Miami's coverage at the start of this week, which covered the arrival of the international dance community to Miami for the 24th Winter Music Conference festivities.

The 24th annual International Dance Music Awards winners have been announced last night and Tiësto won an unprecedented amount of 4 awards in the following categories:

Best Artist (Solo) - Tiësto

Best Global DJ - Tiësto

Best Podcast -"Tiësto's Club Life"

Best Full Length DJ Mix - "In Search Of Sunrise 7: Asia"

"I'm very excited to have won this many awards tonight! The IDMAs are very important to me since the fans are the ones who vote. Thank you so much for your support!"

To see the full list of winners go to

http://www.wintermusicconference.com/idmaballot/nominees/2009.php

The superstar DJ/producer headlined the world's leading two-day electronic music experience, Ultra Music Festival on Friday. Other acts on the bill are Black Eyed Peas, The Prodigy, Bloc Party, Santigold, The Ting Tings, David Guetta and many more.

More Tiësto live dates:

Saturday     4/4     Blu4Dance Festival, Eilat, Israel

Saturday     4/11     Queen Club, Paris, France

Sunday       4/12    Circus Club, Nancy, France

Saturday     4/24     Edition Bangkok Festival, Bangkok, Thailand

Sunday       4/25     Embassy Superclub, The Fort, Taguig City, Philippines

Saturday     5/2     Trondheim Spektrum, Trondheim, Norway

Saturday     5/9     Queen Club, Porrino, Spain

Saturday     5/16     Olympiahalle Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria

Sunday       5/24     Jet, Las Vegas, USA

Monday       5/25     Bank, Las Vegas, USA

Friday         6/5     Beach Party, Skive, Denmark

Saturday     6/6     Forum Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark

Saturday     6/13   Pyramide Vosendorf, Vienna, Austria

Friday         6/19   Ciney Expo, Ciney Belgium

Saturday     6/20   Steel Arena, Kosice, Slovakia

Friday         7/10   Bullmusic Festival, Pamplona, Spain

Saturday     7/11   Breda Live, Breda, The Netherlands

Friday         7/17   Foroya Festivalur, Torshavn, Faroe Islands

Friday         7/31   Victoria Park, London, UK

NEW ENERGY PROJECTS TO PLAY BIG ROLE IN RECOVERY

The Colorado Governor’s Energy Office said today it is establishing a competitive bid process to fund shovel-ready New Energy Economy projects with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds.

 

The Energy Office also is co-sponsoring a recovery conference for utility-company officials on Tuesday, featuring Lt. Gov. Barbara O’Brien, Energy Office Director Tom Plant, Public Utilities Commission Chairman Ron Binz and many others.

 

“President Obama last month chose to sign the recovery act into law in Colorado to showcase Colorado’s New Energy Economy,” Gov. Ritter said. “For the past two years, we’ve attracted new companies and created thousands of new jobs by establishing Colorado as a national leader in the manufacturing, production and research of clean energy.

 

“The recovery act will help drive the New Energy Economy forward by creating new opportunities for families, businesses and communities all across Colorado,” Gov. Ritter said.

 

The Governor’s Energy Office (GEO) will issue a request for shovel-ready project proposals at the end of March or in early April, depending on the timing of guidelines from the U.S. Department of Energy.

 

The GEO defines shovel-ready as an energy efficiency or renewable energy infrastructure project or program that has been extensively developed and for which there is a clear path to implementation within 90 days from the time of award.

 

To submit questions or ideas about this process, go to www.colorado.gov/energy/recovery/inquiry.asp . For more information on shovel-ready projects go to www.colorado.gov/energy/recovery/shovel-ready.asp.

 

On Tuesday, the GEO is teaming with several state agencies to host an energy-related recovery conference focused on how Colorado gas and electric utilities and their customers can benefit from the recovery act.

 

The conference is scheduled for 1 to 5 p.m. Tuesday in the Ritz-Carlton Hotel ballroom at 1881 Curtis St. in downtown Denver.

 

For an agenda and registration information, click here or visit www.dora.state.co.us/puc/agendas/03-10-09ARRA-Symposium.pdf.

 

Other co-sponsors include the Colorado Public Utilities Commission, Colorado Office of Economic Development and International Trade and the Colorado Department of Labor and Employment.

 

For additional information and to monitor how recovery funds are being spent in Colorado, visit www.colorado.gov/recovery.