bad

Audio Fidelity Sets Two 24 Karat Gold CD Releases for June 21

In its ongoing program of reissuing classic rock and pop albums, Audio Fidelity will release 24 Karat Gold CD versions of Carly Simon's 1972 NO SECRETS and Bad Company's 1975 STRAIGHT SHOOTER on June 21.  The discs will be issued as numbered, limited editions that will be retired after their initial runs have sold out, and will be available from both online and brick-and-mortar retail outlets.

First issued in November of 1972, NO SECRETS was Simon's breakthrough LP and remains her best-selling recording to date, having held the No. 1 position on Billboard's album chart for five weeks and ultimately gone Platinum five times over.  Her third long-player, NO SECRETS contains Simon's signature single, the chart-topping "You're So Vain," which features Mick Jagger on backing vocals, as well as its follow-up, "The Right Thing to Do."  The album introduced eight new Simon originals, as well as a cover of James Taylor's "Night Owl," and enlisted an all-star cast of support players.  Taylor joins Simon on vocals for "Waited So Long," which also boasts contributions from Little Feat's Lowell George (slide guitar) and Bill Payne (organ), while Paul McCartney, Bonnie Bramlett and Doris Troy (of "Just One Look" fame) lend vocal assists on "Night Owl."  Richard Perry (Ray Charles, Rod Stewart, Ringo, Tiny Tim) produced NO SECRETS, and Paul Buckmaster, best known for his work with Elton John, provided string and woodwind arrangements on "When You Close Your Eyes" and the choral arrangement on "Embrace Me, You Child."

STRAIGHT SHOOTER was the sophomore album by British hard-rockers Bad Company.  Released in April of 1975, it earned the quartet of Paul Rodgers, Mick Ralphs, Simon Kirke and Boz Burrell its third and fourth hit singles:  "Good Lovin' Gone Bad" (penned by guitarist Ralphs) and "Feel Like Makin' Love" (a Ralphs co-write with vocalist/guitarist Rodgers).  The latter track was a Top 10 hit and has enjoyed a storied pop-culture legacy, having been covered by, among others, Kid Rock, ska-punkers Goldfinger and country singer Philip Claypool, and used on episodes of The Simpsons and South Park.  In addition to the singles, the album contained the FM-rock-radio staples "Deal with the Preacher" and "Shooting Star" (which Simon Kirke and Mick Ralphs have explained was inspired by the deaths of Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin and Jim Morrison).  STRAIGHT SHOOTER climbed to No. 3 on both the U.S. and U.K. charts and was subsequently certified for triple-Platinum status.  Bad Company produced the album, which was engineered and mixed by Ron Nevison, whose credits include The Who's Quadrophenia and the Rolling Stones' It's Only Rock 'N Roll.

Randy Newman @ the Boulder Theatre | 3/9/11

Randy Newman has long been one of the most musically and lyrically ambitious singer-songwriters ever to be at play in the fields of popular music.

Born on November 28, 1943 to a renowned musical family, by seventeen Newman was a working songwriter. In 1968 he debuted with Randy Newman, and before long an unusually wide range of artists were recording his songs.

Critics lauded the musical depth, edge and literary quality of his lyrics as the 70's brought 12 Songs, Live, the classic Sail Away and brilliant and controversial Good Old Boys. Little Criminal caught the public's ear with the hit "Short People". Born Again followed.

In the Eighties, Newman's foray into film composing earned him his first two of sixteen Oscar nominations. Trouble In Paradise and the Grammy-winning score for The Natural followed. Next, Land of Dreams was considered another breakthrough work.

In the Nineties, Newman earned an Emmy and several more Grammys for work on films like Toy Story, James and the Giant Peach, Bug's Life and Toy Story 2. Newman also tickled his adult audience with his darkly hilarious take on Faust. The four-CD compilation: Guilty: 30 Years of Randy Newman and Bad Love followed, and in 2002, Newman won his first Oscar for Best Original Song for Monsters Inc. He has also earned 5 Grammy awards and 2 Emmy awards throughout his career.

The Randy Newman Songbook, Vol. I (2003), his first effort for Nonesuch, introduces powerful new solo versions of early classics and recent gems alike. The eighteen songs are an intimate and powerful reminder of the enduring work that Newman has established. In 2008 he released Harps and Angels; for Nonesuch records. His first collection of new songs since 2009's Bad Love.

Most recently, Newman wrote the songs and score for Disney's The Princess and the Frog as well as Toy Story 3. He has earned two more Academy Award nominations(19 total) in the Best Original Song category for Almost There and Down In New Orleans.

On June 2nd 2010 Newman received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

More Info / Buy Tickets

Marton Sexton readies new album 'Sugarcoating'

Sugarcoating, Martin Sexton’s new album due out April 6, 2010, finds the one-of-a-kind artist doing what he does best: locating larger truths within specific details of the life he’s living. “I write from personal experience — my own hang-ups and quirks, good times and bad times. That keeps it real.”

The Syracuse-born artist tracked Sugarcoating live off the floor in seven days with a remarkably cohesive studio band composed of what Sexton describes as “amazing players, the best you could find.”

“Each song is so stylistically different from the next,” adds Sexton, “I’ve always preferred records that range, sort of like the White Album, from ‘Black Bird’ to ‘Helter Skelter.’ At one time, industry types tried to convince me to stick with one genre, but it was like wearing a suit that didn’t fit.”

“I recorded this album with no rehearsals, no pre-production, using all vintage gear from what went into the mics to what came out on the analog tape . . . I like making records like the old jazz guys did — they just showed up and worked it out.”

The title track, disturbing in its theme and audacious in its presentation, takes “keeping it real” to another level. An unsettling look at post-9/11 reality, the song encapsulates in the lines “I wonder why nobody wonders why/with all the sweet sweet sweet sugarcoating/the nightly news gone entertainment biz/and politicians out showboatin’/One day somebody tell it like it is.” Which is exactly what Sexton accomplishes here. The fact that this urgent message is embedded in a danceable, happy-go-lucky arrangement complete with backing vocals by what Sexton calls his “cowboy trio” only serves to deepen the song’s impact.

Other songs on Sugarcoating include “Long Haul,” a Bakersfield-rooted, bluesy, earth-toned shuffle that celebrates the unparalleled richness of a long-term relationship; “Shane,” in which Sexton imagines the experiences awaiting his infant son; “Found,” which asserts that our wired existence drowns out our ability to see others clearly; and “Always Get Away,” a lament about missed opportunities and unforeseen circumstances. Sexton says, “It’s about forgiveness — forgiving oneself the mistakes you’ve made in the past. It’s about knowing who I am and who I’m not, and about having a conscious contact with my inner voice and my higher power.”

Not every song is heavy. The first single, “Livin’ the Life,” is a buoyant joy-of-existence piece with a churning clavinet burrowing a deep soul groove right through it.  “Stick Around” is a piano-driven Beatlesque bouncer complete with an Abbey Road reference in the lyric; and “Easy on the Eyes” is a finger-snapping, ragtime mating call with a voice trumpet solo from Sexton.

It’s Sexton’s uncanny ability to connect the personal to the universal via songs like these that has earned him such a devoted following among fans and critics alike. The New York Times’ Jon Pareles wrote that the artist “jumps beyond standard fare on the strength of his voice, a blue-eyed soul man’s supple instrument . . . his unpretentious heartiness helps him focus on every soul singer’s goal: to amplify the sound of an ordinary heart.” He’s also renowned among his peers. John Mayer calls him “one of the greatest singers of our generation.”

With Sugarcoating, Sexton may well have made his defining record. It’s an unquestionable high point for the modern troubadour who headlines venues from the Fillmore Auditorium to Nokia Theater Times Square, oversees his KTR label and derives great satisfaction from the life he’s made for himself. These are the fruits of a combination of rarefied talent, fierce determination, “and work — showin’ up,” he adds, sounding like Jeff Bridges’ Bad Blake character in Crazy Heart: “I sing for free man. I get paid to travel.”

Sexton will tour North America with a new band April through June in support of the release.

Track listing
1. Found
2. Boom Sh-Boom
3. Always Got Away
4. Livin the Life
5. Sugarcoating
6. Stick Around
7.  Long Haul
8.  Shane
9.  Wants Out
10. Friends Again
11. Easy on the Eyes
12. Alone 13. Just To Be Alive

The Subjects On Headlining Tour With Bad Veins

Despite their clandestine and controversial beginnings (two band members were teachers and two were students at the same high school), The Subjects have managed to carve a name for themselves that sounds more like "Rushmore" than "School of Rock." Back in 2002, guitarist Joe Smith and bassist/vocalist Dave Sheinkopf were splitting their time between writing songs and syllabi, while drummer/vocalist Matt Iwanusa and guitarist Jimmy Carbonetti were about to bust out of the same Manhattan school. Since both parties were in desperate need of a full band, they held some rehearsals and once it became clear that the quartet's chemistry was pretty damn combustible, the Subjects were born.

Fast-forward a few years and things get a bit more complicated. The Subjects’ debut is dropped (2007’s With the Ease Grace Precision and Cleverness of Human Beings) and they hit the road, at first on their own and then with the Walkmen a few months later.

“We were always serious about playing music,” says Iwanusa, “but when we started meeting and playing with bands that were making music for a living we got to see how they did it.”

Keeping that career path in mind, the Subjects dove right into the demo stages for New Soft Shoe, firing up minimalist recordings in the style of their first full-length. Once those songs were ready for a proper studio, the band headed over to Key Club Recording Co. a couple hours outside Chicago. By working closely with Key Club’s masterful engineers, William Skibbe and Jessica Ruffins (see also: rock-solid releases from Cass McCombs, The Kills and Fiery Furnaces), the Subjects were able to whip up their wildest ideas, expanding their arsenal with everything from old-fashioned organs to honky-tonk pianos to Matt’s mom on saxophone.

“A lot of the instrumentation on this record came from stuff I learned in school—stuff I never thought I’d use,” says Sheinkopf, citing his training in classical harmony.

The first thing you’ll notice about the final product is the vocals—the way the melody in “Winter Vacation” unfolds like a spare Animal Collective A-Side; the brilliant shuffleboard beats/honeyed harmonies of “Right2Know.” Beyond that, the ep spreads the Subjects’ various strengths across the divergent tastes of four distinct songwriters in just 10 minutes. Well, divergent in terms of pulling cues from several eras and subgenres. All and all, the current state of the Subjects is as cohesive as a dictator-less band gets.

“Most of the arrangements on the first record are within the constraints of a four-piece band,” explains Iwanusa. “Now everyone’s more comfortable trying to sing and play different instruments. We all stepped it up this time.”

US Tour Dates

Fri 9/25 - Music Hall Of Williamsburg - Brooklyn, NY
Sat 9/26 - MPMF Festival - Cincinnati, OH $
Sat 10/3 - Middle East Upstairs - Boston, MA *
Mon 10/5 - Club Cafe - Pittsburgh, PA #
Tue 10/6 - The Bishop - Bloomington, IN #
Wed 10/7 - Lager House - Detroit, MI #
Thu 10/8 - Empty Bottle - Chicago, IL #
Fri 10/9 - TBA - Lincoln, NE #
Sat 10/10 - Hi Dive - Denver, CO #
Mon 10/12 - Kilby Court - Salt Lake City, UT #
Tue 10/13 - Reef - Boise, ID #
Wed 10/14 - High Dive - Seattle, WA #
Thu 10/15 - Rotture - Portland, OR #
Fri 10/16 - Sam Bond's Garage - Eugene, OR #
Sat 10/17 - Luigis - Sacramento, CA #
Mon 10/19 - Soda Bar - San Diego, CA #
Tue 10/20 - The Echo - Los Angeles, CA #
Wed 10/21 - Modified Arts - Phoenix, AZ #
Fri 10/23 - Emo's Jr. - Austin, TX #
Sun 10/25 - Cicero's - St. Louis, MO #
Tue 10/27 - The Cambridge Room @ HOB - Cleveland, OH #
Wed 10/28 - DC Nine - Washington, DC #
Thu 10/29 - Kung Fu Necktie - Philadelphia, PA #

$ = w/ Chairlift, Micachu and the Shapes, Heartless Bastards
* = w/ The Soft Pack
# = w/ Bad Veins

The Subjects Play DENVER At Hi Dive On 10.10 With Bad Veins

Despite their clandestine and controversial beginnings (two band members were teachers and two were students at the same high school), The Subjects have managed to carve a name for themselves that sounds more like "Rushmore" than "School of Rock." Back in 2002, guitarist Joe Smith and bassist/vocalist Dave Sheinkopf were splitting their time between writing songs and syllabi, while drummer/vocalist Matt Iwanusa and guitarist Jimmy Carbonetti were about to bust out of the same Manhattan school. Since both parties were in desperate need of a full band, they held some rehearsals and once it became clear that the quartet's chemistry was pretty damn combustible, the Subjects were born.

Fast-forward a few years and things get a bit more complicated. The Subjects’ debut is dropped (2007’s With the Ease Grace Precision and Cleverness of Human Beings) and they hit the road, at first on their own and then with the Walkmen a few months later.

“We were always serious about playing music,” says Iwanusa, “but when we started meeting and playing with bands that were making music for a living we got to see how they did it.”

Keeping that career path in mind, the Subjects dove right into the demo stages for New Soft Shoe, firing up minimalist recordings in the style of their first full-length. Once those songs were ready for a proper studio, the band headed over to Key Club Recording Co. a couple hours outside Chicago. By working closely with Key Club’s masterful engineers, William Skibbe and Jessica Ruffins (see also: rock-solid releases from Cass McCombs, The Kills and Fiery Furnaces), the Subjects were able to whip up their wildest ideas, expanding their arsenal with everything from old-fashioned organs to honky-tonk pianos to Matt’s mom on saxophone.

“A lot of the instrumentation on this record came from stuff I learned in school—stuff I never thought I’d use,” says Sheinkopf, citing his training in classical harmony.

The first thing you’ll notice about the final product is the vocals—the way the melody in “Winter Vacation” unfolds like a spare Animal Collective A-Side; the brilliant shuffleboard beats/honeyed harmonies of “Right2Know.” Beyond that, the ep spreads the Subjects’ various strengths across the divergent tastes of four distinct songwriters in just 10 minutes. Well, divergent in terms of pulling cues from several eras and subgenres. All and all, the current state of the Subjects is as cohesive as a dictator-less band gets.

“Most of the arrangements on the first record are within the constraints of a four-piece band,” explains Iwanusa. “Now everyone’s more comfortable trying to sing and play different instruments. We all stepped it up this time.”

US Tour Dates

Wed 10/7 - Lager House - Detroit, MI #

Thu 10/8 - Empty Bottle - Chicago, IL #

Fri 10/9 - Bourbon Theater - Lincoln, NE

Sat 10/10 - Hi Dive - Denver, CO #

Mon 10/12 - Kilby Court - Salt Lake City, UT #

Tue 10/13 - Reef - Boise, ID #

Wed 10/14 - High Dive - Seattle, WA #

Thu 10/15 - Rotture - Portland, OR #

Fri 10/16 - Sam Bond's Garage - Eugene, OR #

Sat 10/17 - Luigis - Sacramento, CA #

10/18 - Brookdale Lodge - Brookdale, CA #

Mon 10/19 - Soda Bar - San Diego, CA #

Tue 10/20 - The Echo - Los Angeles, CA #

Wed 10/21 - Modified Arts - Phoenix, AZ #

Fri 10/23 - Emo's Jr. - Austin, TX #

Sun 10/25 - Cicero's - St. Louis, MO #

Mon 10/26 - The Vollrath - Indianapolis, IN #

Tue 10/27 - The Cambridge Room @ HOB - Cleveland, OH #

Wed 10/28 - DC Nine - Washington, DC #

Thu 10/29 - Kung Fu Necktie - Philadelphia, PA #

$ = w/ Chairlift, Micachu and the Shapes, Heartless Bastards

* = w/ The Soft Pack

# = w/ Bad Veins

The Bad Plus & Marco Benevento Trio @ Boulder Theater

bad-plusArguably one of the biggest breakout stories of jazz in the past decade, The Bad Plus (Reid Anderson - bass; Ethan Iverson- piano; & David King - Drums) have connected with the jazz world and beyond with These are the Vistas (2003), Give (2004), Suspicious Activity? (2005), and Prog (2007).

Performing both original compositions and a variety of covers, The Bad Plus brings a winningly disparate body of influences to the stage. This is not a jazz trio for whom being "rock-influenced” means simply playing loud or referencing Led Zeppelin, Nirvana, and The Pixies, etc. With deep experience writing and performing across several genres, these guys are shrewd, hearty improvisers with the ability to build, contort, distort, destroy, rebuild and reinvent without losing grasp of “the song.”

Marco Benevento returns with Me Not Me, a new studio album featuring interpretations of songs by artists including My Morning Jacket, Leonard Cohen and Deerhoof among others. The ten-track collection arrives within a year from release of Benevento’s critically acclaimed debut studio effort, Invisible Baby. Like its predecessor, Benevento is joined on the sessions by bassist Reed Mathis and drummers Matt Chamberlain and Andrew Barr.

Marco-beneventoMarco Benevento initially garnered national attention playing Hammond B-3 organ and Wurlitzer in The Benevento-Russo Duo, but he shifts the focus to acoustic piano with his own trio. Throughout Me Not Me, he proves himself one of the most compelling sonic innovators of his generation, re-imagining the instrument by running it through pickups, delay and distortion pedals and a Fender Super Reverb Amp.

Tickets are on sale now at The Boulder Theater Box Office. Call (303) 786-7030 for tickets by phone. Tickets are also available through our website @ www.bouldertheater.com.  Ticket prices include tax and service charge.

Offshore Drilling: Top 10 reasons it's a BAD idea

Say NO to offshore drilling!- for the Grateful Web

Gas prices have been jumping over and under the $4 mark all summer, your grocery bills are soaring, and campaign ads are blasting you about the benefits of offshore drilling. So what's an average Joe or Jane supposed to believe? Will offshore drilling really make things better for you?

What you're hearing on the news is pretty one-sided, and most reporters are talking about this issue like it makes perfect sense. Well, it doesn't.

What can I say; sometimes dumb ideas get a lot of attention. That's exactly what's happening right now as President Bush has lifted the executive moratorium on offshore drilling, and Congress is being pushed to do the same.

Let me take just a second to review the top 10 reasons offshore drilling is such a dumb idea:

10. Offshore oil drilling won't impact gas prices today, and it won't have a significant impact on gas prices in the future.

9. This is nothing more than a money grab by the oil companies - who are already making record-breaking profits.

8. We burn 25% of the world's oil here in the U.S., but we have only 3% of the world's oil reserves. So even if all offshore oil magically came to market today, the vast majority of our oil would continue to be imported, and we wouldn't see price relief at the pump.

7. The current moratorium was put in place decades ago to protect us from the danger of oil spills along our coastlines and beaches.

6.  Burning fossil fuels like oil causes global warming, which causes stronger hurricanes, which will threaten the very offshore drilling rigs being proposed, which will contribute to even more global warming.

5. To avoid the worst impacts of global warming, we need to switch from fossil fuels to renewable energy within the next 10 years. The billions of dollars that would be spent on offshore oil drilling just postpones the inevitable transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy.

4. Oil exploration requires massive seismic testing - which threatens whales and dolphins.

3. Oil prices are set on the global oil market, so American oil is no cheaper than Saudi oil. We won't get a discount for oil drilled in the U.S.

2. We can't solve the world's energy problems with the same drilling that created them.

1. Renewable energy is available now, so it's time to walk away from fossil fuels and toward a clean energy future.

 

Take Action >> make sure Congress hears from YOU about offshore oil drilling.

Let's face it, there's really no good reason to drill offshore. More drilling is good for Big Oil, not for you and your family. We can't drill our way out of this mess - oil drilling is already at an all-time high and prices are still skyrocketing.

As a matter of fact, even if we could tap into all of the energy stored in the Earth's reserves - coal, oil, and natural gas - it would equal the energy in just 20 days of sunshine. Tell Congress to look on the bright side to solve our energy crisis. It's time to invest in renewable energy and leave oil to the dinosaurs. It's time for an energy revolution.


702 H Street, NW, Suite 300, Washington, D.C. 20001
(800) 326-0959

Melanie Duchin
Global Warming Campaigner

The Bad Plus the Real O'Riley Factor

"If the Coen Brothers put together a jazz trio, perhaps it would be like this, the comic and the dramatic rolled together."

–– The Guardian

Good Times Bad Times: Rose Hill Drive Does Zeppelin I

As I walked up to the Boulder Theater on Friday night there were a ton of people standing out side. Normally these are fans having their last cigarette before heading into the venue for the show. But tonight all of these people were looking for anyone with an extra ticket. I grabbed my ticket from will call and headed in to the all ages show. The place was packed! I heard there were 115 people on the guest list, not to mention the fact the place was sold out by Friday morning.

I'm a Nice Jewish Girl With a Big Bad Tattoo

JD Salinger- for the Grateful Web

Time to stifle your shrieks and open your minds, dear readers, for you will find that this is a story outside of the parameters of Judaism.  A story not about desecrating The Body, but one of adorning it, rewarding it.  It is about a little needle and a whole lot of Bacitracin.  You've read the title; you know what I'm talking about.I was not raised in a home particularly concerned with religion.  Channukah was just like any other week and cheeseburgers weren't outlawed due to kashrut but for cholesterol content. In fact, it was barely a week ago that I even learned the word kashrut. But branding my body was taboo nonetheless, because, simply put, my mother "said so, that's why."  She said, "it's classless, Jennifer, and gratuitous and dangerous.  Nice Jewish girls just don't do it."  And so I nodded and asked her to pass the pork. But funny things happen to a body in college and mine began doing the things it wanted, because it wanted, and started raising its eyebrow at rules that had previously been left unquestioned.  It was then that I stumbled upon  Seymour:  An Introduction, by J.D. Salinger.  Perhaps you've read it.  If not, perhaps you should.  I won't reprint any parts or pieces due to potential copyright infringement (although if it meant meeting Salinger, off to court in shackles I would happily go!), but you must trust that the work touched me in a way I could hardly articulate.  It made my very limbs tingle and in closing the pages, I missed it like a friend who had moved far away.  And I wanted to carry it with me always. So......When I got to the tattoo parlor, I was doubtless.  My calls had been placed to the AIDS hotline for reassurance and I had a Hershey bar on hand for emergency endorphins.  I had also reread my beloved Seymour before leaving, so the epiphany was sitting fresh on my shoulders as I headed toward the needle.  Hardly a flinch later, I left...calm...with a small red bicycle painted daintily on my body.  I had a symbol of Seymour, literally, at my hip.In the past seven years since I had myself illustrated, I've confessed to mother and added a second tattoo to my shoulder blade Life is Elsewhere, by Milan Kundera....ah, our poor, doomed Jaromil).  I have also had to do a lot of explaining to friends, family, and numerous passersby who have happened to spy me in a tank top.  They wonder why I would hurt myself like that; they remind me that nice Jewish girls shouldn't spoil their skin.  What they don't understand is that by being tattooed, I was simply adopting as part of my body beautiful pictures, images that I hold dear.  It is not desecration, it is decoration, celebration.  It's putting a gold foil crown on the birthday girl's head.  And I don't believe anyone's god could find that wrong.  I know that mine finds it pretty.