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John McLaughlin July 2011 Tour

John McLaughlin & the 4th Dimension is currently on tour in Europe.  John is in the midst of the Montreux Jazz Festival in Switzerland with Carlos Santana.  John will be in Spain, Italy, England, Holland & Norway.

We are very happy to announce Remember Shakti will tour in Europe next fall 2012, from October 25th to November 25th 2012. They will celebrate the 35th anniversary of the first and the most amazing world music and fusion band, Shakti ! With John McLaughlin (guitar), Zakir Hussain (tabla), Shankar Mahadevan (vocals), U. Srinivas (mandolin), V. Selvaganesh (kanjira, ghatam, mridangam).

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July 2011 Tour dates:

3/7 Montreux Jazz Festival Switzerland - BB King's night - with special guest John McLaughlin

8/7 Nice Jazz Festival Nice France John McLaughlin & the 4th Dimension

9/7 North Sea Jazz Festival Rotterdam Holland John McLaughlin & the 4th Dimension

11/7 Ronnie Scott London UK John McLaughlin & the 4th Dimension

12/7 Casino de Paris Paris France John McLaughlin & the 4th Dimension

14/7 Guitar Festival of Cordoba Spain John McLaughlin &t he 4th Dimension

18/7 Roma Italy John McLaughlin & the 4th Dimension

19/7 Kulturzentrum Tollhaus Karlsruhe Germany John McLaughlin & the 4th Dimension

21/7 Molde Jazz Molde Norway John McLaughlin & the 4th Dimension

23/7 Heineken Jazzaldia San Sebastian Spain John McLaughlin & the 4th Dimension

24/7 Teano Italy John McLaughlin & the 4th Dimension

25/7 Fano Italy John McLaughlin & the 4th Dimension

28/7 Jazz à Vannes France John McLaughlin & the 4th Dimension

30/7 Jazz in Marciac France John McLaughlin & the 4th Dimension

31/7 Cadaques Music Festival Spain John McLaughlin & the 4th Dimension

The Henry Clay People To Release "Somewhere On The Golden Coast"

We know what you’re thinking: The Henry Clay People aren’t really from L.A., right? After all, their TBD debut, Somewhere on the Golden Coast, sounds like the riff-slinging byproduct of playing hard—and drinking even harder—in Midwestern bars that keep their jukeboxes stocked with old Pavement and Replacements records or whatever Robert Pollard released that week.

“While we don’t quite fit in with L.A.’s noise scene or the singer-songwriter crew that hangs out at the Hotel Cafe,” says vocalist/guitarist Joey Siara, “we've found a nice little niche for bands like us in L.A—just a bunch of friendly people who prefer to hang out, drink cheap beer, and listen to Big Star records on a Saturday night.”  Joey and his 23-year-old little brother Andy—also a singer/guitarist—formed The Henry Clay People in 2005.  Since then the band has developed a reputation for spreading their unpretentious slacker guitar rock though out greater Los Angeles and beyond.  "I think we played close to 200 shows in 2007-2008 and most of those were just local to southern California. 2009 was nice though because we really got to hit the road for most of the year and see if the tunes held up outside our little bubble."


Somewhere on the Golden Coast bottles that boundless live energy in 11 airtight tracks and 34 filler-free minutes. Listening closely, it’s easy to see how all of this started, how a revolving door of “crappy punk bands” led the Siara brothers to form The Henry Clay People in the first place.  Two buzz-building albums (2006’s Blacklist the Kid With the Red Moustache and 2008’s For Cheap or For Free) and several lineup shifts later, they’re still keeping things simple.  Recorded mostly at The Ship Studios in Eagle Rock, CA by Earlimart frontman Aaron Espinoza, he encouraged the band to ditch the headphones, take it easy on overdubs, drink more beer, and record live in the same room to tape.  The idea was to get as close as possible to the essence of the live show.

Golden Coast pushes and pulls between the two brother's influences.  Joey's zeal for jagged distorted guitars ("Nobody Taught us to Quit), gets smoothed out by Andy's laid back "drive into the sunset" love of The Byrds, Jackson Browne, and Grandaddy. The influence of the latter—along with their dad’s considerable classic rock collection—creeps into a couple Golden Coast cuts, lending a nostalgic from-dusk-’til-dawn feel to “A Temporary Fix” and the album’s melancholic curtain-closer, “Two Lives At the End of the Night.” Both of which provide a nice contrast to such certified piano-spiked jams as “Working Part Time,” “Your Famous Friends,” and “End of an Empire.” And since this particular long player barely eclipses the 30-minute mark, you better believe The Henry Clay People never wear out their welcome. In fact, they may just leave you wanting more.

“We want our music to be accessible, but still mean something,” says Joey. “That’s the spirit of this band—nothing we’re doing is rocket science, but we’re playing the music we love. And if some people recognize that, great. Rock ’n’ roll is rock ’n’ roll.”

May Tour With Drive By Truckers:

May 5th Rialto Theatre Tucson, AZ
May 6th House Of Blues San Diego, CA
May 7th Avalon Ballroom LA, CA
May 8th Fillmore Theater San Fran, CA
May 12th In The Venue Salt Lake City, Utah
May 13th Boulder Theater Boulder, CO
May 14th Aggie Theater Ft. Collins, CO
May 15th Belly Up Aspen, CO

THE CORE:

JOEY- Voice and Guitar
ANDY- Voice and Guitar
MIKE- Drummer Boy
JONATHAN- Voice and Bass JORDAN- Piano and Voice

I'm a Nice Jewish Girl With a Big Bad Tattoo

JD Salinger- for the Grateful Web

Time to stifle your shrieks and open your minds, dear readers, for you will find that this is a story outside of the parameters of Judaism.  A story not about desecrating The Body, but one of adorning it, rewarding it.  It is about a little needle and a whole lot of Bacitracin.  You've read the title; you know what I'm talking about.I was not raised in a home particularly concerned with religion.  Channukah was just like any other week and cheeseburgers weren't outlawed due to kashrut but for cholesterol content. In fact, it was barely a week ago that I even learned the word kashrut. But branding my body was taboo nonetheless, because, simply put, my mother "said so, that's why."  She said, "it's classless, Jennifer, and gratuitous and dangerous.  Nice Jewish girls just don't do it."  And so I nodded and asked her to pass the pork. But funny things happen to a body in college and mine began doing the things it wanted, because it wanted, and started raising its eyebrow at rules that had previously been left unquestioned.  It was then that I stumbled upon  Seymour:  An Introduction, by J.D. Salinger.  Perhaps you've read it.  If not, perhaps you should.  I won't reprint any parts or pieces due to potential copyright infringement (although if it meant meeting Salinger, off to court in shackles I would happily go!), but you must trust that the work touched me in a way I could hardly articulate.  It made my very limbs tingle and in closing the pages, I missed it like a friend who had moved far away.  And I wanted to carry it with me always. So......When I got to the tattoo parlor, I was doubtless.  My calls had been placed to the AIDS hotline for reassurance and I had a Hershey bar on hand for emergency endorphins.  I had also reread my beloved Seymour before leaving, so the epiphany was sitting fresh on my shoulders as I headed toward the needle.  Hardly a flinch later, I left...calm...with a small red bicycle painted daintily on my body.  I had a symbol of Seymour, literally, at my hip.In the past seven years since I had myself illustrated, I've confessed to mother and added a second tattoo to my shoulder blade Life is Elsewhere, by Milan Kundera....ah, our poor, doomed Jaromil).  I have also had to do a lot of explaining to friends, family, and numerous passersby who have happened to spy me in a tank top.  They wonder why I would hurt myself like that; they remind me that nice Jewish girls shouldn't spoil their skin.  What they don't understand is that by being tattooed, I was simply adopting as part of my body beautiful pictures, images that I hold dear.  It is not desecration, it is decoration, celebration.  It's putting a gold foil crown on the birthday girl's head.  And I don't believe anyone's god could find that wrong.  I know that mine finds it pretty.