growing

A Hot Rize Halloween at the Boulder Theater

Hot Rize has marked 32 years in bluegrass, keeping its legend growing by delivering first-class music and entertainment as only it can. The band rose to prominence in the early 80's, appearing frequently on such national broadcasts as "A Prairie Home Companion", Austin City Limits, and on The Nashville Network. Their stage show gained renown, featuring their soulful and distinctive bluegrass combined with their wacky but musically deft "alter-ego" country swing band, Red Knuckles and the Trailblazers. The group performed in almost every state, as well as Europe, Japan, and Australia.

The traditional-yet-progressive foursome started in January, 1978, based in Colorado and naming itself after the secret ingredient of Martha White self-rising flour, the product Flatt & Scruggs promoted in the 50s and 60s. With national touring and multiple #1 bluegrass radio hits Hot Rize became a premier attraction and stylistic trend-setter. In 1990, the band was feted as Entertainer of the Year by IBMA at its first annual Awards Show. Throughout the 1990s, the group continued to perform occasionally for a loyal and growing fan base.

Following the untimely passing of original member Charles Sawtelle in 1999, the group reorganized in 2002 with Nashville studio ace/multiple Grammy-winner Bryan Sutton on guitar, and has continued to play selected shows each year, delivering its signature sound to a new generation of followers. Hot Rize has remained a top attraction in bluegrass, well into its fourth decade. In 2009, the band was selected to co-host the 20th annual IBMA Awards Show. The year 2010 will see increased activity, including major festivals and new studio recordings. More Info / Buy Tickets

No Jam in the Dam 2011, look for return in 2012

A note from the organizers of the Jam in the Dam Festival:

Dear Friends,

After long consideration, we have decided to postpone Jam in the Dam until 2012. We really wanted to do it for the fans, including our growing base of Europeans for whom this show is the one chance each year they can enjoy what many of us here take for granted. We had sincere interest from many bands this year, but in the end, we felt like we did not have a line-up that would be ‘new and improved’ from years past. With the economic climate and the expense involved in traveling to Europe, we find that Jam In the Dam may be more approachable for the fans and may become more successful as a biannual event.

Amsterdam offers a cultural experience unlike that of any other festival in this genre. Ask anyone who has been, and they will rave about the atmosphere and intimate nature. We are planning to have 2012 ready to go by February 2011, so that we can offer a choice to traveling jamband fans. This will also give people a year to plan for the time off and save their money. Also, we’re working on more weekend days so more of our friends from Europe can become part of our growing scene there.

Most people who are fans of this amazing event know what the founder, Armand Sadlier, has been through, but rest assured his health is better than ever. This event will NOT go away, and his love of Amsterdam will be the catalyst for continuing to bring people to one of the most beautiful and welcoming cities on Earth! See you in 2012!

~ Jam in the Dam ~

Javelin Announce US Tour

“George was pretty damn eclectic as a kid,” says Tom Van Buskirk, referring to his cousin/Javelin collaborator, George Langford. “I was more of a snob, growing up on the Beatles and classical music. Like I didn’t get into Nirvana until after MTV Unplugged came out. I’m always late to the party.”

Maybe that’s why Javelin formed in 2005—to throw a party of their own, one that sees nothing wrong with dropping crooked disco (“On It On It”), schoolyard funk (“Intervales Theme”), abstract R&B (“Dep”) and pitch-perfect pop (“Mossy Woodland”) in the same set. At least that’s the way things unfold on Javelin’s debut album, No Más, the eagerly-awaited follow-up to a self-released collection of demos (Jamz n Jemz) and a pair of limited Thrill Jockey 12-inches (Javelin, Number Two).

It’s as if Javelin were programmed to reproduce the golden age of every genre known to man, bouncing between samplers and strings, drum machines and drum sets, and a growing collection of guitars, horns and homemade thumb pianos. You read that right: Most of No Más’ dusty 45 moments aren’t lifted from actual recordcrates. They’re painstakingly recreated, note by note, from the jukebox in Javelin’s collective mind.

“I love making music that has flaws and human fingerprints all over it,” adds Langford. “There’s also that grey area where you can’t tell what’s a sample, although it leaves you wanting to say, ‘Hey, I did that!’”

There’s no denying who’s doing what at Javelin shows, ever-evolving pieces of performance art that leave the laptops at home and have more in common with the multi-tracked madness of an old Jamaican sound system than the standard guitar/bass/drums setup of a ‘band’.

“The worst thing in the world would be to have a wall of dudes staring at your gear, watching your every move,” says Langford, “So we try to inject as much life and energy into our performances as possible.”

When they first started playing around Providence, this meant an overwhelming array of “turntables, glockenspiels and percussion.” Now that they’ve settled in Brooklyn and stripped their restless sound down to its bare essentials, Javelin’s become known as the guys with the boom boxes, a Flaming Lips-like technique that’s allowed them to break down the artist/audience wall at such tour stops as New York’s Museum of Modern Art.

“A lot of people think they’re ornaments, but they play sound,” says Van Buskirk. “It’s like, ‘You really thought we dragged all of this here for nothing?”

Never. You see, everything has its place in a Javelin song, from the shimmering keys and brassy strut of “Shadow Heart” to the loony tune loops of “Oh! Centra.” So if you’re trying to ‘figure Javelin out’, don’t bother. These musical omnivores work their music like a rabid radio dial, leaving a tricky trail of sonic breadcrumbs in their wake. Or as Langford puts it, “The minute I start working in one style, I get distracted and want to work on another one. We kinda gave up on finding our ’sound’ years ago.”

Tour Dates
2/9 - Music Hall of Williamsburg - Brooklyn, NY*
2/16 - Academy 2 - Birmingham, UK*
2/17 - Oran Mor - Glasgow, UK*
2/19 - The Academy - Dublin, IE*
2/20 - Speakeasy - Belfast, NI*
2/21 - Academy 3 - Manchester, UK*
2/22 - The Faversham - Leeds, UK*
2/23 - Heaven - London, UK*
2/24 Windmill Brixton  LONDON, UK (headlining)
2/25 - Thekia - Bristol, UK*
2/26 - Digital - Brighton, UK*
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3/4 - E & L Auditorium - New York, NY
3/5 Trocodero Theatre w/ Man Man -PHILADELPHIA, PA
3/23 - The Jackpot Saloon - Lawrence, KS#
3/24 - Bourbon Theatre - Lincoln, NE#
3/25 - Public Space One - Iowa City, IA#
3/26 - The Bishop - Bloomington, IN
SAT 3/27 BIG EARS FESTIVAL - KNOXVILLE, TN
3/28 - Cafe Bourbon St - Columbus, OH
3/29 - The Cafe - Detroit, MI#
3/30 - And And And (Artspace) - Toronto, ON#
3/31 - The Friendship Cove - Montreal, QC#
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Yeasayer US Tour
SAT 4/3 WASHINGTON, DC 9:30 CLUB*
SUN 4/4 CARRBORO, NC Cat's Cradle*
MON 4/5 ASHEVILLE, NC Orange Peel*
TUE 4/6 ATLANTA, GA Masquerade*
WED 4/7 MEMPHIS, TN Hi Tone Café*
THU 4/8 DALLAS, TX Granada Theatre*
FRI 4/9 HOUSTON, TX House of Blues*
SAT 4/10 AUSTIN, TX The Parish*
SUN 4/11 AUSTIN, TX  The Parish*
TUE 4/13 MARFA, TX Crowley Theatre*
WED 4/14 TUCSON, AZ Club Congress*
THU 4/15 PHOENIX, AZ Rhythm Room*
FRI 4/16 - La Casa Encendida - Madrid, ES

* Yeasayer