valentine

Vanity Theft Announce New Album & Tour

Following on the heels of several months of non-stop touring in support of their recent EP, Anatomy, Vanity Theft, Ohio’s rockin' female quartet is ready to unleash their new full-length album, Get What You Came For, due digitally on February 1st, with the physical album available in stores on March 1st via
Vigilante Music/Adamant Records.

To celebrate the news, we’re happy to share a remix of the albums’ track “Anatomy,” by Lefse Records’ artist Houses, who gives the song a nice ambient spin! Vanity Theft is also thrilled to announce a Spring 2011 national tour, alongside Hunter Valentine! The tour will find them hitting markets all across North America- let us know if you’d like to check out any of the dates.

Vanity Theft is Alicia Grodecki (vocals/keyboard), Lalaine (bass), Brittany Hill (guitar) and Elyse Driskill (drums). Over the past five years, the band has built a rabid following the old fashioned way: by touring their asses off. The bands’ early gigs started in their hometown of Dayton, then spread after a highly successful stint on 2009’s Warped Tour, resulting in several national tours in 2010 (most recently with Sick of Sara).

Reminiscent of some of the best old school as well as post riot-grrl indie sounds (The Runaways, L7, Sleater Kinney), Vanity Theft tears it up live, leaving the audience almost as sweat-drenched as the band when it’s all over.

After attracting the attention of former Disney Channel star Lalaine, who joined the band permanently earlier this year, the band set to work on the Anatomy EP, which dropped last month as a precursor to the upcoming full-length. Get What You Came For finds the band at their very best: catchy, edgy, and dancey as hell. The album kicks off with the charging track “Trainwreck,” and doesn’t let you go until the final notes of “Missing Teeth” slowly fade out.

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Upcoming Vanity Theft Tour Dates

November 10 - Indianapolis, IN - Birdie's
November 12 - Dayton, OH - Canal Street Tavern

(* = w/ Hunter Valentine)
February 2 - New York, NY - The Knitting Factory *
February 4 - Washington, DC - U Street Music Hall *
February 5 - Charlotte, NC - The Milestone *
February 7 - Atlanta, GA - Purgatory *
February 9 - Webster, TX - Club Eden *
February 10 - Austin, TX - Emo's *
February 11 - San Antonio, TX - Korova *
February 12 - Dallas, TX - Sue Ellen's *
February 13 - Oklahoma City, OK - The Conservatory *
February 17 - Scottsdale, AZ - The Rogue Bar *
February 18 - San Diego, CA - Soda Bar *
February 20 - San Francisco, CA - Milk Bar *
February 24 - Seattle, WA - Studio Seven *
February 25 - Boise, ID - Neurolux *
February 26 - Salt Lake City, UT - Burts Tiki *
March 1 - Kansas City, MO - The Riot Room *
Mar 2 - St. Louis, MO - Ciceros *

Help Make Earth Day About Overpopulation

Overpopulation is at the root of all environmental problems, but you wouldn't know it from listening to most environmental groups. The topic is rarely discussed, even though unsustainable human population growth is eating up wildlife habitat, polluting water, overfishing the oceans, and driving species extinct.

Overpopulation is the most important -- and most ignored -- environmental problem on the planet. Help us change that by donating to our Earth Day Overpopulation Fund.

Building on the spectacular success of our Valentine's Day launch of the Endangered Species Condom project, we will distribute a quarter of a million funny, edgy, conversation-provoking Endangered Species Condoms in all 50 states this Earth Day, April 22. With your help, it will be one of the biggest overpopulation campaigns in U.S. history.

Our six condom packages have beautiful drawings of endangered species and funny sayings like "Wear with care, save the polar bear" on the outside. Inside, they explain how species are being crowded off the planet by an ever-growing human population, and what people can do about it.

The packages are designed to get people talking about overpopulation. And boy, do they work. We tested them on Valentine's Day, expecting 100 volunteer distributors to come forward. An astounding 5,000 people volunteered taking all 100,000 condoms in just a couple of days!

As planned, the media ate it up. We generated funny but deadly serious conversations about overpopulation and the extinction crisis in hundreds of newspapers including The New York Times, L.A. Times, Miami Herald, and Boston Globe. More than 300,000 blogs and Web sites covered the issue.

Please help us ramp up the campaign now with a generous gift to our Earth Day Overpopulation Fund. It's the perfect opportunity to reach hundreds of thousands of people at Earth Day events across the country. We need to raise $50,000 in the next week to make it happen. With $50,000, our staff can produce and distribute a quarter-million Endangered Species Condoms on Earth Day and double our overpopulation activist network.

It is imperative that we break the wall of silence around overpopulation. If we don't, all the environmental progress we make will be overwhelmed by the sheer mass of people pushing into the last wildlife habitats, eating the last fish, and damming the last wild rivers.

I hope you'll commit now to support this critical, creative project and help us distribute a quarter of a million condoms for Earth Day 2010.

Celebrate Valentine's Week At Iridium With Vocal Legends Jimmy Scott & Andy Bey

Venerable vocalist Jimmy Scott does it all, from soulful spirituals and R&B grooves to passionate ballads and popular song. Scott’s big, soul-stirring sound defies his diminutive size and projects a powerful will to overcome adversity. Despite a career beset with heartaches, Scott has relentlessly pursued this very personal form of expression, achieving a level of artistry that is unparalleled.

Ray Charles describes Jimmy's singing, "This man is all about feeling. He defined what 'soul' is all about in singing long before anyone was using that word!"

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Andy Bey's silky bass-baritone voice has been called "one of the finest instruments in jazz." He's got a unique way of mixing lyrics and melody to tell a story, and after more than five decades of making music, the 70-year-old musician has a growing legion of fans worldwide.

IRIDIUM JAZZ CLUB
1650 BROADWAY (CORNER OF 51ST)
NEW YORK, NY 10023
RESERVATIONS: 212-582-2121
HTTP://WWW.IRIDIUMJAZZCLUB.COM/

FEB. 11 & 12 JIMMY SCOTT

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FEB. 13 & 14 ANDY BEY

Blue Turtle Seduction Releases 13 Floors for Valentine's

photo courtesy of Tsunami Publicity- for the Grateful Web

The fresh musical movement known as Blue Turtle Seduction is a two-fold sonic experience. Both musically and socially aware, the five-piece rock / bluegrass / reggae / hip-hop hybrid creates music that defies classification. Embodying the essence of South Lake Tahoe, CA, Blue Turtle Seduction captures the upbeat, party vibe and jovial ambiance of their hometown. On the strength of their latest release, 13 Floors, BTS is proving themselves to be a mainstay on the musical circuit for years to come.

Featuring Jay Seals (guitar, vocals), Glenn Stewart (harmonica, pan flute, vocals), Christian Zupancic (violin, mandolin, vocals), Stephen Seals (bass), and Adam Navone (drums), the quintet crossed paths while working at a conference resort in the Tahoe Desolation Wilderness Area. The five distinctly unique individuals comprise the Blue Turtle Seduction sound, integrating their worldly flair with their love of all things music. From classical to rock, their refined and dynamic sound has been capturing audiences on a nightly basis.

13 Floors is loaded with trademark Blue Turtle Seduction. Capturing the diversity of the band in fluid stages, the latest release showcases music with purpose. The lyrics and melodies are infused with revelry and the harmonies encourage whole-hearted sing-a-longs. Melodic guitar leads complement the layers of strings and woodwind textures. The rhythm section is groovy and as tight as a snare drum, inevitably leading to a full-fledged dance party. "With each track, the elevator shifts to the side, up, or down, into a slightly different style. But it's all woven together within the Blue Turtle Seduction building; unmistakably us, and an authentic representation of our California blend," says Zupancic. Blue Turtle Seduction's musicianship is second to none and shines through the interplay between the five multi-talented instrumentalists.

In addition to their musical contributions, Blue Turtle Seduction is also involved in several environmental and social organizations as well. Known for their involvement and contributions to many non-profit organizations, BTS is committed to making a difference on all levels. Their tour bus has been converted to run on straight vegetable oil and the 13 Floors release is packaged in all sustainable and biodegradable materials, proving BTS as a leader amongst environmentally conscious artists on the road today.

Already making waves, Blue Turtle Seduction has gigantic plans for 2009. Committed to promoting 13 Floors and bringing the BTS vibe to the masses, the hard-working group has plans to hit western states like California, Utah, Nevada and Colorado, and also making their way to Midwestern and Southern regions from Ohio to Oklahoma. Audiences have been magnetized by the BTS sound and their high-energy live performances. Through high-energy entertainment combined with activism and outreach, BTS is music for not only the socially aware but for those looking for a positively great time.

Happy Valentine's Day... from Africa!

Pamela in Africa 2003/2004- for the Grateful Web
- for the Grateful Web

I am back in Iringa again, to take care of some business and buy certain things that I cannot buy in or near my village, like a new (used) pair of work pants and a new short-wave radio, since mine for some reason is not working.  I have been borrowing my friend Carolyn's radio however, and listening to BBC or VOA everyday.  I find all of this talk about war to be very disturbing, but I also feel removed from it.  There are a few Muslims around in this part of the country, but they do not at all appear to be threatening.  The only adverse attitudes we volunteers have encountered is the occasional "Osama!"  shouted out at us from little boys, usually only in the bigger cities.  There has been terrorist threats on the island of Zanzibar, but no action resulted from them. 

Life in the village continues to be nothing but peaceful.  I am beginning to be very busy - talking with farmers about the problems they are having with their crops and trees, and projects they would like to do.  Beekeeping, medicine for cows, and layer hens are first on the list, but I will not have any funds to initiate these projects until May or June, due to changes in our Peace Corps project budgets.  In the mean time, I have begun helping to weigh babies at "clinic day" which is held once a month for the mamas to bring their babies to be examined.  These days will be good times for me to hold seminars about health and nutrition for the mamas.  Next month already, I'm giving a seminar about how to make banana bread and corn bread!  Bananas and corn are two things that we have an abundance of in the village, and although sweet breads may not be considered to be entirely healthy, they do add some variety to the villager's diets.  Also on Monday, I will begin teaching English to first and second graders at the primary school near my house.  At first I was apprehensive about this since I have never taught English before, but first and second grade should be fairly easy, and I think it will be a lot of fun!  Once the students get to secondary school, all of their courses are taught in English, and many of them fail since English is not adequately taught in primary school, so I feel this is a very important thing to do.  There are four students from my village that attend secondary school (the have to ride their bikes 12 miles every day round trip!), and I have begun to tutor them in English and other subjects.  Very few students have the opportunity to go to secondary school, because not only do they have to pass a very difficult examination (in English!), but their parents also have to pay fees.  So usually, only students with parents who have paying jobs get to go. 

Two opposing attitudes I have observed and experienced here have posed challenges to feeling completely comfortable and "blending in" with Tanzanians.  One attitude is that because I am white and come from America, some villagers seem to think that means I can do anything and have all the answers to their problems.  I feel a lot of undue respect from them, especially when I look around and see many of their answers to their problems (their poverty in particular) are all right here.  Several farmers already make compost and use contours and have fruit trees and beehives.  It's just that the information is not shared.  Some people seem to be saying that only if it comes from me, it will seem like the right thing to do.  How I will convince them that their knowledge is just as, if not more valuable, I do not know. The other attitude is apparent resentment of my material wealth.  I look around my little cottage of a house and think about how few things I have here compared to what I had or what most people have in the States!  But even what I have here is far more than most villagers can ever even hope to have.  This resentment is more blatant when I leave my village, and people shout out at me, begging for money, or when cocky young 20-something males strike up a conversation about the differences between the US and Tanzania, and ask "so why is it that you have a job and I don't?"  Jared Diamond offers an answer to these questions in the book Guns, Germs, and Steel (an excellent read, I highly recommend it), but how do you begin to explain his intricate and elaborate theory in a 10-minute conversation (and in broken Swahili and English)?  I'm not sure this question can ever be answered in a completely satisfying way for those of us who feel guilt, or for those of us who feel resentment, about the disparities in the world. But I'll continue to carry on, waging PEACE!