violin

The Mahavishnu Project presents THE COMPLETE "VISIONS OF THE EMERALD BEYOND"

THE MAHAVISHNU PROJECT: Gregg Bendian, drums / Glenn Alexander, guitar / Neil Alexander, keyboards / Jim Cammack, bass / Chern Hwei, electric violin / Melissa Stylianou, voice / Pete Furlan, saxophones / Jon Weber, violin / Will Hakim, viola / Leigh Stuart, cello

The Mahavishnu Project is the only jazz repertory ensemble of its kind to receive the endorsement of guitarist/composer John McLaughlin and ALL of the original members of The Mahavishu Orchestra. In fact, keyboardist Jan Hammer hired MahaProj to be his band for the night at MoogFest 2006 in NYC- his only US appearance in over 15 years.

The Mahavishnu Project typically presents "complete album evenings" such as "The Complete Birds of Fire" or "The Complete Inner Mounting Flame." Of late the band is presenting a 35th anniversary concert of Mahavishnu's "Visions of the Emerald Beyond", known to fans and historians alike as the pinnacle of the 1970's jazz fusion movement - boldly combining elements of jazz, rock, classical, Indian music and free-form sonic exploration. In 2008, The Mahavishnu Project released "Return to the Emerald Beyond" on Cuneiform Records. It is a reverent re-imagining of the entire original Emerald Beyond music from start to finish and includes encores from "Birds of Fire" and "Inner Mounting Flame."

“Just a little note of appreciation for what you are bringing back to life. This musical period was the beginning of finding my own way in music, and to hear you guys playing those tunes in such an unbelievable way is quite amazing. Great job!! Keep up the good work.”

-John McLaughlin

JESSE GRESS with members of the Mahavishnu Project will be performing the music of Jeff Beck and Jan Hammer.

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Friday, June 10, 2011 

Doors: 8:00 pm

Show: 9:00 pm

Tickets: $20 General Admission

Joe Deninzon's Exuberance

Progressive jazz violinist Joe Deninzon, is honored to announce the release of EXUBERANCE. Recorded with bassist Robert Bowen, and guitarist Stephen Benson, EXUBERANCE is the essence of three musicians in a room, playing live with no overdubs or production; a completely raw experience.

The group draws influences from jazz stylists including the gypsy explorations of Django Reinhardt and the hot swing of violinist Stephane Grappelli along with rock and pop standards of the past 40 years including songs by Steely Dan, Alice in Chains, Jimmy Webb and Radiohead.  A few choice covers by Radiohead (“The Tourist”), Alice in Chains (“Heaven Beside You”), Steely Dan (“Bodhissatva”) and Fat's Waller's “Jitterbug Waltz” show just how wide the group's range goes.

One of the group's original songs, “Sun Goes Down” (featuring Luba on lead vocals), has been featured in the independent film, “What's Up Scarlet?” and a recent winner in the Jazz category of the Billboard and John Lennon International Songwriting Contests.

The album is also a tribute to Robert Bowen, who was killed when a car struck him as he rode his bike in Manhattan late August.  Live, the band performs with bassists who were friends with Robert, plus drummer Luciana Padmore (from Joe's band Stratospheerius).  The group has donated some of its earnings and CD sales to Robert's children.

Best known for his work on the 7-string electric violin and lead singing with the rock group Stratospheerius, Joe Deninzon plays acoustic violin in this Trio.  Joe has performed as a solo violinist with the New York City Ballet, and on album or in concert with Bruce Springsteen, Sheryl Crow, Jane Monheit, Everclear, Ritchie Blackmore of Deep Purple, Smokey Robinson, and Les Paul.  A 10-time BMI Jazz Composer's grant recipient and a winner of the John Lennon Songwriting Contest, his original music has been used on CMT, MTV VH1, Comedy Central, National Geographic, the Travel Channel and the History Channel.

Wires Under Tension Announce Debut Album, 'Light Science'

For nearly thirteen years Christopher Tignor lived in the 3-story commercial space in Greenpoint, Brooklyn where he conceived and practiced with his band Slow Six. In 2008, thanks to a tipped off fire marshal, a move was inevitable, and the walls had to come down. Drastic measures would be necessary in order to keep making music on his own terms - living completely immersed in his studio and practice space. Step one was relocating to the Mott Haven neighborhood of The Bronx. Far removed from an overwhelming hipster scene he had never connected with, he found himself surrounded by the working-class grit and intensity typically associated with The South Bronx. The new musical landscape Wires Under Tension creates uncannily echoes this transition.

Charged with the desolation of a Mad Max dystopia, the songs on Wires Under Tension's debut Light Science form a narrative in motion from lightness to darkness. The band's name reflects the duo's ongoing struggle to balance this tension as they wrestle with an unpredictable and unforgiving machine of their own making. Wordless voices of the horns and violin feel like lightning riding a stormy sea of drums and drones. That lightning illuminates the duo's muscular rhythms, formidable dynamic, and unique musicianship. As they beckon us into their storm, they seem to effortlessly sidestep the cliches found in much of today's instrumental music, delivering exciting and mysterious gems from their unique netherworld.

Light Science will be available digitally through all major retail outlets December 7th

The Contribution: -- 'Which Way World'

When members of New Monsoon, Railroad Earth and String Cheese Incident come together to create an album the result is Roostsy Americana bliss. Contribution, an appropriate name for a group whose members have bestowed many a musical gift to the masses with their previous bands, will drop Which Way World on March 30.

An album bursting with country gumption and raw poetic flare, this debut showcases the artistic veracity and harmonious nature of some of the best musicians on today’s jam circuit. A balanced blend of old-time charm and aggressive string-heavy muscle, this collaborative effort exemplifies the razor-sharp skills of Tim Carbone (violin, vocals Railroad Earth), Jeff Miller (guitar, mandolin, vocals, New Monsoon), Phil Ferlino (keyboards, New Monsoon), Keith Moseley (bassist, the String Cheese Incident), and Jason Hann (percussion, the String Cheese Incident).

From the initial notes, “Come Around” takes off like a tumbleweed in a dust storm, moving with force, freely charting out its own territory in a sandy soundscape of earnest handclaps, vocal harmonies and a fierce web of strings. Chameleon-like in nature, this opening track captures both a mischievous apathetic side and one of comforted hope. The dichotomous lyrics of “Never mind/never mind/why?” and “Sometimes you gotta lose yourself/find yourself/come around again” play out like a fencing match of internal conflict. The track rounds things off with a whiskey soaked “I don’t care!” from Carbone.

“Time Was Only Yesterday” initially breathes saloon-singer vulnerability, and holds that vintage desire to relive the past. Unexpectedly, lyrics about a “carnival parade” are quickly met by a collage of festive circus-esque clamor. The colossal racket is spiked with the scream of brassy horns and faded shouts you would imagine escaping from the lips of a vagabond ringleader.

“Better Days” proves to be one of the most lyrically poignant tracks on the album. The need for nostalgia, once again, resurfaces. While it gets off to a mellow start, the harmonized sturdy chorus of ‘Gone gone away are better days,’ which culminates with the tinge of tambourine, stands out like a mighty oak left upright after a forest fire.

Brilliance isn’t limited to the instrumentals when you stop to absorb the momentous metaphors and similes just swimming around in the ocean of sound – “Couldn’t see the danger there/ like children scaling rocks beside the sea…”

“Fear of Nothing” hits the listener like a sun shower on a sweltering day. Cool, refreshing and unapologetic, it reigns down with honky tonk tenacity. The upbeat, electrifying piano-laden, tune exudes a sense of rock n’ roll, gospel and blues. Sprinkling a ferocious feminine energy to the mix, are the Black Swan Singers who come equipped with fierce pipes—strong enough to stir a corpse. By far the most danceable tune on the disc, it resembles a hybrid of Great America Taxi meets the Black Crowes.

‘Wind Me Up’ is more spoken then sung and comes across like a sincere monologue of someone who has grown tired of, but accustomed to, going through the motions. The accompaniments and vocals are reminiscent of something quirky country alt-rockers Wilco would create.

“Which Way World,” the title track of the album, captures a Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young vibe and yet at times it sounds more like a top ten contemporary country radio hit. Slow, steady and straight up Zenful, it’s a letter to our spinning sphere inquiring bout the very nature of its direction.

“Samsara” opens with piano playing that is rapidly coated by the lush emotion-evoking violin, proving that there is nothing like strings to set a melancholic mood. Capturing a rather dark tone, it sounds like a Celtic pagan homage to the earth— “I am the sky/speak through the wind/I am a shadow/darkness within...”

Let the musical monsoon of earthy cheese-coated goodness splash full force in a downpour that will have you tossing the umbrella and caution to the wind.