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Rose Hill Drive at Fox Theatre | 10.15.11

Z2 Entertainment is proud to present Rose Hill Drive with Dax Riggs at the Fox Theatre on Saturday, October 15th.  Tickets go on sale Friday, August 26th for $15.00 in advance and $17.00 day of show.

Following a two year hiatus, except for one gig opening for Jane’s Addiction on New Year’s Eve in 2009, Boulder-based rock and roll band Rose Hill Drive has returned to debut the addition of new member bass player Jimmy Stofer and an entire album’s worth of brand-new material.

In 2003, guitarist Daniel Sproul, his vocalist brother Jacob and childhood friend drummer Nate Barnes began practicing in the basement of the house on Rose Hill Drive in Boulder, Colorado that the Sproul brothers grew up in. Since then, they’ve released two full-length albums, 2006’s self-titled debut and 2008’s “Moon Is The New Earth,” several EPs, and developed a worldwide fan base. In 2009, the trio went on hiatus.

In the ensuing months, Jacob switched from bass to guitar, bassist Stofer came on board, and the newly formed quartet began writing new material, which eventually became the band’s third studio album, 2011’s “Americana.” Stofer was previously a member of such local favorites as Hello Kavita and Dualistics.

Rose Hill Drive’s raw, emotive rock has earned the group high praises from both critics and fellow musicians alike. The band has opened for Wilco, The Black Crowes, Queens Of The Stone Age, Van Halen, Aerosmith, Stone Temple Pilots and The Who, among others.

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Rose Hill Drive

Fox Theatre

Saturday, October 15th, 2011

Doors:  8:00 pm

Show Time:  9:00 pm

Sam Llanas of the BoDeans readies solo album '4 a.m.'

Sam Llanas (pronounced yanas), lead singer-guitarist for the acclaimed Milwaukee band the BoDeans, takes listeners deep into the night on his new release, 4 A.M., arriving Oct. 25 on Inner Knot Records. The intimate, mostly acoustic collection, produced by longtime collaborator Gary Tanin, features 10 new Llanas originals and a dazzling cover of Cyndi Lauper’s hit “All Through the Night.”

Llanas says of his latest work, “I do a lot of work late at night. It’s a night record, a nocturnal record, thematically about things that happen in the night. That covers a lot of ground. It could be the simple things — being in love, being with somebody — or about the loneliness that the night can bring.”

The album, an understated complement to the BoDeans’ just-released 10th studio album Indigo Dreams, is markedly different from Llanas’ 1998 solo bow A Good Day to Die, which was a powerful eulogy for Llanas’s brother recorded under the group rubric Absinthe.

“The Absinthe record was kind of bombastic and very intense,” Llanas says. “I wanted to do something that was lighter, as light as I can get. I wanted it to be completely different. That’s why 4 A.M. is pretty much an acoustic record.”

Work on 4 A.M. began nearly four years ago, when Llanas’ band the BoDeans, which he has led since 1983, was between projects.

He recalls, “I had time on my hands, and I had some songs I wanted to record. I started working with Terry Vittone — I just said, ‘Hey, let’s make some recordings.’ There was no real thought that it was going to be an album or anything like that. It just sort of escalated from there.”

Sessions for the embryonic project commenced at guitarist Vittone’s house. “I would record the songs in the afternoon,” Llanas says, “and get them to a point where I liked them. Then the next day I’d go back, and Terry would say, ‘Sam, I want you to hear some ideas I threw down on the track.’ And Terry was willing to take really strong direction from me, because I didn’t want a guitar player who was playing all over the song. Terry was really good at putting in the nuances that were needed. He played very little, and that seemed to work very well.”

With the majority of the material in the can, a protracted layoff from recording ensued. After almost two years, Llanas began completing 4 A.M. at Daystorm Music in Milwaukee with producer-musician Tanin, who had also worked on A Good Day To Die and supplied the strings on the new recording.

Llanas decided to preserve the original recording’s spare quality, and added a couple of new tracks that were left untouched. “I wanted to keep it simple. ‘The Way Home’ and ‘Janey’ seemed to work really well just the way they were.”

However, he adds, “I thought the other songs needed a bit more dressing up. Some I thought would work better if we put a little bit more on them.” Thus, BoDeans keyboardist Bukka Allen was called in to play accordion, while Milwaukee musicians Matt Turner and Ryan Schiedermayer contributed bass and percussion, respectively.

Some of the compositions on 4 A.M. began life as prospective material for the BoDeans, Llanas says: “‘Nobody Luvs Me’ was actually recorded with the BoDeans, but it’s quite a different version — you wouldn’t really know it’s the same song. ‘Shyne’ was on our album Mr. Sad Clown. I thought that would work really well there, so I brought it into that project. The first song on 4 A.M., ‘Oh, Celia,’ was demoed with the BoDeans years and years ago. That’s quite an old song.”

Nestling seamlessly with Llanas’ own cycle of before-dawn melodies is his hushed cover of Lauper’s 1983 perennial “All Through the Night,” penned by Jules Shear. “It’s a beautiful song,” Llanas says, “but when they recorded it, in the early ’80s, the sound that they got on it was so harsh . The keyboards always ruined the song for me. I really wanted a version of that song that was just beautiful. That’s what I tried to do — honor that song, and give it what it deserved.”

Llanas’ new solo opus offers a new dimension to his music — one that actually dates back to the sunrise of his professional career.

“Before I ever had the BoDeans, I was a solo performer in Waukesha,” he remembers. “I would go and play at these open mic shows, and I learned my craft and honed my stage skills that way. I think this record really reflects that part of my career, that part of my personality. It goes back to before I ever performed with the BoDeans. It was just me — one man and one guitar.”

Esteemed rock critic and author Dave Marsh calls 4 A.M. “A great record. Really the best thing that has come out of their music in a long, long time — closer to classic BoDeans. Sammy’s voice is so much what I love about BoDeans and it has never been showcased any better.”

Legendary Pianist Steve Kuhn at the Triad - NYC

This Friday, May 27th, New York's acclaimed Triad Theatre on the upper west side presents a special jazz concert, featuring a solo performance by pianist Steve Kuhn and a performance by Saxophonist Daniel Bennett and his band.  Steve Kuhn will perform selections from his critically acclaimed album, "Mostly Coltrane" on the ECM label.  The Daniel Bennett Group will perform selections from their newest album, "Peace and Stability Among Bears."  Advance discounted tickets are available for purchase at www.brownpapertickets.com/event/171424.  Tickets are available at the door for $25.  The concert starts at 9:30pm and is an all-ages event. The Triad is located on the upper west side, at 158 West 72nd Street.

Legendary pianist Steve Kuhn has established himself as one of the preeminent voices in the jazz world. Kuhn began his illustrious career performing as a sideman with the likes of Stan Getz, John Coltrane, and Art Farmer.  At the end of the 1960's he spent four years living in Europe. Upon returning to the United States, Kuhn began his long-term affiliation with the revolutionary record label ECM.  This resulted in a string of important albums including Trance, Ecstasy, Non-Fiction,and important collaborations with Sheila Jordan.  In the mid-80's, Kuhn co-founded the popular 'All Star Trio', with bassist Ron Carter and drummer Al Foster. Kuhn also launched a revolving edition of his trio with bassist David Finck and various drummers, like Joey Baron, Lewis Nash, Billy Drummond, Kenny Washington and Bill Stewart. Steve Kuhn has released over 20 critically acclaimed albums on the Blue Note, Concord, and ECM labels. Kuhn continues to tour extensively throughout the world, with a strong following in the United States, Europe and Japan.

Critically acclaimed New York saxophonist Daniel Bennett has recently shared concert stages with artists like Bill Frisell, Charlie Hunter, James Carter, Billy Martin (Medeski, Martin & Wood), Jerry Bergonzi, and David Fiuczynski.  The Boston Herald described Daniel Bennett’s music as, “exploratory folk-jazz.” Bennett’s musical journey began as a graduate student at the prestigious New England Conservatory in Boston, Massachusetts.  During this time, Bennett began to compose songs that featured folk melodies played on the saxophone in a jazz quartet format.  Bennett's chord progressions also maintained a unique minimalist quality, influenced by composers like Steve Reich and Philip Glass. The Boston Phoenix described Bennett's style as, "an unusual folk-minimalist approach."  The music was innovative, yet remarkably accessible to a broad spectrum of listeners. The Boston Globe described Bennett’s music as “a mix of jazz, folk, and trance.”  The Daniel Bennett Group has released four albums on the Bennett Alliance label, A Nation of Bears, The Legend of Bear Thompson, Live at the Theatre, and Peace and Stability Among Bears.  Daniel Bennett’s "Folk Jazz" music has found a broad fan base that is unusual for a modern jazz outfit. Insite Magazine called Daniel Bennett’s music, “refreshingly capricious and trippy."

The world-renowned Triad Theatre has hosted performances by entertainers like Slash, Joan Osborne, Lisa Loeb, Paula Cole, Susan Lucci, Buddy Miles, Ravi Coltrane, Debbie Gibson, David Crosby, George Benson, Max Weinberg, John Entwistle, Tracey Morgan, Kathie Lee Gifford, Matthew Broderick, Rachel Dratch, and Steve Gutenberg. The Triad was the original home for Off-Broadway hits like "Forever Plaid," "Forbidden Broadway," and "Secrets Every Smart Traveler Should Know."

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Friday, May 27th

Triad Theatre

158 West 72nd St, New York, NY

Purchase Tickets HERE!

Golden Dogs Announce Spring Tour Dates, To Play SXSW

At the end of a hard year of touring in support of their second album ‘Big Eye Little Eye’, which took them by way of Britain and Germany, straight across the USA sharing stages with Canadian luminaries like Feist and Sloan, those who witnessed its fury likely had no inkling it was the end of a chapter for the band. The long awaited homecoming was bittersweet; there were big changes on the horizon. For starters, the band had been released from their record contract; a contract they had been locked into for years that now left them 100% in control of their business affairs. In another twist of fate, their long time bass player, Stew Heyduk, decided to leave the country and get married in Hawaii. Within weeks of being at home and somewhat directionless, the question began looming: “What now?” While there are always songs brewing on lead man Dave Azzolini’s hot plate, the idea of going straight into recording another album wasn’t an attractive one. They needed a break from being Golden Dogs.

Without trying to force movement into the intimidating ‘next album’ phase, the couple began spending more time hanging at a little garage studio on Toronto’s east side, operated by their good friends Carlin Nicholson & Mike O’Brien - this duo now known as Zeus. The whole crew had a lot of fun just writing and recording tunes they had written and while Nicholson honed his engineering chops, everyone nurtured and developed their production skills. As well, the studio was a very welcome place for other musician friends to pop by. Friends like Neil Quin (ex-Golden Dog/future Zeus member) and Afie Jurvanen (Bahamas) who ended up playing a solo on the Golden Dogs album as a return favor for Azzolini playing piano on one of the Bahamas tracks he recorded there.

The spirit was described by Azzolini: “It was very much a ‘best idea wins’ situation and the songwriter always had final veto power. It made for a very comfortable environment to make music. It was just musicians getting together to bounce ideas off each other.” This was a great time to forget about being in a band, and to just get back to playing music for it’s own sake, with a group of friends riding the same wave and just soaking in the energy of the studio. The result is titled Coat of Arms, and it brilliantly displays the musical union Azzolini, Grassia, Knox and company have found with each other, and the band seems to be more confident and commanding than ever before. One marvels at the way they can seem playful and sweet on a track like LESTER, yet terrifyingly savage on BURST or DARKROOM.

The most obvious and wonderful difference this time around is that Ms. Grassia takes a giant leap forward and can be heard taking the lead on almost half the album with a range spanning from sweet & psychedelic (UNDERWATER GOLDMINE) to seductive (AS LONG AS YOU LIKE) to furious pop madness on songs like WHEN THE MOVIE’S OVER, and CHEAP UMBRELLAS. Her vocal performances while drumming (AS LONG AS YOU LIKE and LESTER) is quickly becoming a Golden Dogs secret weapon and quite an impressive element to their live shows.

What now? Coat of Arms will be released on Dine Alone April 26th 2011. Feeling up-beat and optimistic about the new direction, Azzolini boasts that “the versatility of this new line up opens up a whole new world of possibilities for Golden Dogs live shows and the future of our recordings…there are so many directions we can go…and we’re going to try all of them.”

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Golden Dogs tour dates:

Mar 17: SXSW @ Hole in the wall (day party)\

Mar 19: SXSW @ Paradise on 6th

Mar 22:  Portland @ Wonder Ballroom**
Mar 23: Seattle @ Showbox**
Mar 24: Vancouver @ Biltmore**
Mar 26: Missoula, MT @ Wilma Theatre**
Mar 27: Jackson, WY @ Q Roadhouse**
Mar 29: Ames, IA @ The Maintenance Shop**
Mar 30: Omaha, NE @ Waiting Room**
Mar 31: Minneapolis, MN @ Varsity Theatre **
Apr 1: Madison, WI @ The Majestic**
Apr 2: Chicago, IL @ The Vic**
Apr 3: Pittsburgh, PA @ Mr. Smalls**
** w/ State Radio

A Benefit Jazz Concert Charlie Hunter Duo & Daniel Bennett Group

Sunday Series at Abingdon is proud to present 8-string "groove" guitarist Charlie Hunter and "Folk Jazz" Saxophonist Daniel Bennett who are teaming up for a special double bill performance to benefit not-for-profit Abingdon Theatre Company.

Guitarist Charlie Hunter has established himself as one of America's preeminent guitar players and musical innovators. Hunter’s latest recording, Gentlemen, I Neglected To Inform You You Will Not Be Getting Paid, features the guitarist alongside drummer Eric Kalb (Sharon Jones and the Dap Kings, John Scofield) and a new horn section, including trombonist Curtis Fowlkes (Jazz Passengers, Lounge Lizards, Bill Frisell), trombonist Alan Ferber (Don Byron,  Kenny Wheeler) and trumpeter Eric Biondo (Antibalas, TV On The Radio). This marks Hunter's second full-length release on his independent label Spire Artist Media. Hunter follows up his latest trio album, Baboon Strength, with an ambitious effort recorded live direct to two-inch analog tape.

Critically acclaimed New York saxophonist Daniel Bennett has recently shared concert stages with national artists like Bill Frisell, Charlie Hunter, James Carter, Billy Martin (Medeski, Martin & Wood), Jerry Bergonzi, and David Fiuczynski. Bennett’s musical journey began as a graduate student at the prestigious New England Conservatory in Boston, Massachusetts.  While at NEC, Bennett studied saxophone with Jerry Bergonzi, George Garzone, and Ken Radnofsky.  Daniel Bennett graduated from the conservatory in 2004 and began performing as a freelance musician with groups like the Portland Symphony, New Hampshire Festival Orchestra, Musaner, and the Duprees. During this time, Bennett also began to compose songs that featured folk melodies played on the saxophone in a jazz quartet format.  Bennett's chord progressions also maintained a unique minimalist quality, influenced by composers like Steve Reich and Philip Glass.. The band’s landmark debut album, A Nation of Bears, was met with critical acclaim. The Daniel Bennett Group released The Legend of Bear Thompson in the spring of 2008. Metronome Magazine ranked the album in their top five picks of the month, declaring, "the trio is so in sync with each other that it's downright mystical."  In 2009, the Daniel Bennett Group released Live at the Theatre, a groundbreaking album that was recorded live during a double bill performance with the Charlie Hunter Trio. The Daniel Bennett Group has been featured on popular radio programs like Harvard University’s Jazz Spectrum (WHRB 95.3FM).  The group has also made television appearances on Bandwidth TV, The Music Closet, Style Boston, and Sal's Show. The Daniel Bennett Group can be heard at clubs and festivals throughout the United States.

Since 1993, not-for-profit Abingdon Theatre Company has developed and produced new plays by American playwrights exclusively. Under the artistic direction of Jan Buttram, the company provides a safe home in which playwrights collaborate with other theatre artists and receive audience feedback through the utilization of a four-step development process: First Readings, Staged Readings, and Workout Labs, which culminate in Studio Productions and Mainstage Productions.  

For Tickets visit their website.

LivePhish Limited Released Today

On Sunday June 27, 2010, Phish played their sixth headline show (since 1998) at Merriweather Post Pavilion and the second show of a two-night stand to a hot, sticky summer crowd.  Merriweather Post is a wooden-roofed music amphitheater designed by Frank Gehry with excellent acoustics and a capacity of about 19,000.  The band opened set one with "Walfredo" which includes lyrics about Phish's first visit to the venue opening for Santana in 1992.  This rarity, performed only a half dozen times and for the first time in a decade, began a string of breakouts.  The number two spot featured Bob Marley's "Mellow Mood" (played for the first time since 2003’s IT festival), "Divided Sky" and 2010's first "Tela".  A couple more covers, Clifton Chenier's Bayou swinging "My Soul" and Norman Blake's "Ginseng Sullivan", were clustered mid-set along with "Sample In A Jar."  Set one wrapped up with "Brian And Robert" - bookended by Phish classics "Bathtub Gin" and "Run Like An Antelope", the latter of which contained teases of "Brian And Robert."  Set two was a seamless affair rooted in the show's theme song, "Saw It Again" (also played at Merriweather for the first time since IT).  This playful set hinged on exploratory playing and transitions like "Meatstick" > "Saw It Again" > "Piper" > "Ghost" which, like the rest of the set included deft teases of "Saw It Again".  Phish sealed the fate of this uncommon set by weaving their debut of the Rolling Stones' "Jumpin' Jack Flash" back into "Saw It Again".  The remainder of the show: "Contact", "You Enjoy Myself" (with teases of "Jumpin' Jack Flash") and Jimi Hendrix's "Fire" also included multiple nods to "Saw it Again" among its sonic treasures.

Listen to Meatstick > Saw It Again

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On Saturday July 3, 2010, Phish returned to the Atlanta area for the first time since 2003 to begin the final two-night stand of Leg 1 of their summer tour.  Verizon Wireless Amphitheatre at Encore Park is a general-admission multi-purpose amphitheater with a capacity of about 12,000.  Phish had played this exact date in Atlanta eleven years ago in 1999.  The band kicked off the show with "Character Zero" and the only "Destiny Unbound" of Leg 1, followed by "Rift".  A request from the audience earned a trip to Gamehendge for "McGrupp And The Watchful Hosemasters" before a concentrated "Bathtub Gin" and the year's first "Mountains In The Mist".  The combination of "NICU" > "Gumbo" > "My Sweet One" spotlighted Page (aka "Leon") and Fish, who penned the latter two songs.  Set one concluded with "Stealing Time From The Faulty Plan",  "Strange Design”, the only "Sanity" of summer and "Run Like An Antelope" to close the set.  Set two began with an opening sequence of the The Velvet Underground's "Rock And Roll" > "Prince Caspian” (with a jam that entered "Dave's Energy Guide" territory) > "Tweezer" > "Slave To The Traffic Light".  This sublime Tweezer/Slave combination was featured on LiveBait Vol. 02.  Set two continued with "Bouncing Around The Room" > "Possum" and "Backwards Down The Number Line" > "Harry Hood" > "Loving Cup".  The Encore, "Sleeping Monkey" > "Tweezer Reprise", capped a great first performance at Alpharetta.

Listen to Bathtub Gin

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On Sunday July 4, 2010, Phish celebrated their second Independence Day in the Atlanta area (they played Lakewood Amphitheatre July 3 and 4, 1999).  The second show of a two-night stand and the last show of Summer Leg 1 began appropriately with an A capella performance of "The Star-Spangled Banner" followed by a return to Gamehendge for "Punch You In The Eye" > "Colonel Forbin's Ascent" > "Fly Famous Mockingbird"(narration-free except for Trey pointing out the Mockingbird).  Next came some animal songs in the form of "Camel Walk" and "Ocelot" before a three-song combination of "Heavy Things" > "My Friend, My Friend" > "Lawn Boy" after which the rowdy crowd began to chant "USA, USA."  Set one concluded with "David Bowie" and a fiery "Gotta Jibboo".  After more patriotic chanting by the crowd, Phish kicked off a mostly non-stop set two with "Down With Disease" > "Piper" > "Ghost" > "Waste" > "Julius".  "Mike's Song" > "Tela" was next and was the first and only time in nearly fifteen years that these two songs were paired this way.  After an Independence Day greeting from Trey, the band dropped into the year's only performance of "Harpua".  Trey used his holiday "Harpua" narration to educate Atlanteans and visitors alike about "the history of our country as we know it", pointing out that both the real and alternative history books in schools are full of lies.  Instead, he explained, the nation's true history is to be found within Phish's music.  This rap led perfectly into the band's first and only performance of Rage Against The Machine's "Killing In The Name", sung by Fish with all the spirit of the holiday.  A burst of energy from the crowd acknowledged the message was received.  "Killing in The Name" returned to "Harpua" > "Weekapaug Groove", capping this unique Mike's Groove.  The instrumental "First Tube" filled the Encore slot, closing Leg 1.

Listen to Gotta Jibboo

Masters of Reality Announce US Headlining Dates

n maps, or from the air, the Mojave Desert is usually deemed brown... a blotch in the lower stomach of California that bulges against Arizona and Nevada. For fifteen years, the Mojave Desert has been the adopted home of one songwriter / performer / producer who calls himself 'one half of Masters of Reality.' Meet Chris Goss. About 2,800 miles East by Northeast; New York City. Another man sits at the head of Manhattan's media design giant Spontaneous. Director / illustrator / songwriter / drummer, and former member of New York noise and space rock bands Surgery and Dr. Mars, he is the "other" half of Masters of Reality. Meet John Leamy.

For nearly 20 years, the intermittent and somewhat reclusive collaborative musical efforts of Goss and Leamy, collectively known as the avant-renegade rockers Masters of Reality, (a relationship that began with Leamy painting the cover of their very first Masters album), have changed the face and character of rock and roll music around the world. Hence, these two ain't part time hobbyists. Goss describes himself as a "parallel aesthetician." "Art and music can be loaded with aesthetic and esoteric nano-timebombs, each level of delivery and digestion can and should be emotionally manipulated and shaped for the future... and the best part is, no one knows what we're building because it will never be finished. Look how the world of food is fusing, well, that's happening to a million things simultaneously. Our brains and nervous systems, even in our rock and roll, hopefully."

They are what's called in the 'biz' as 'musician's musicians.' Goss explains "With John and I wrapped up in so much media production in our day to day lives, when we get together to record and tour a new 'Masters of Reality' album, it's the white rat thrown into the cage of two hungry pythons. It's nothing short of a quick ecstatic feast. We have absolutely no intentions other than making music that we want to hear, and other musicians definitely sense that wonderful freedom and experimentation and try to emulate it, to great profit. Proof of good design, I'd assume."

And if a band's musical history and credibility are still relevant in today's American Idol, vocal tuned, studio buffed pop world; Goss began working with music-mega-mogul Rick Rubin in the mid 80's by recording the longest running 'Top of the Hour' theme music for MTV. Followed shortly by the release of the first Masters of Reality LP on Rubin's Def American Records. Goss soon reformed the band's line-up to join forces with none other than Cream's Ginger Baker, a collaboration that lasted nearly three years and resulted in an LP that sent the single "She Got Me (when she got her dress on)" to Number 8 on the Billboard charts. Simultaneously, Goss began working and forming what's now known as the 'California Desert Rock Scene,' producing three legendary albums with Kyuss and soon after began producing and even giving the name Queens of the Stone Age to a young musical protege' Joshua Homme. A musical partnership that still exists now nearly 20 years later and the start of a production career that has made Goss one of the world's most sought after rock and roll studio wizards and songwriters. His collaborations include The Cult, Stone Temple Pilots, PJ Harvey, UNKLE, Mark Lanegan, SOULWAX, Dave Grohl, Marilyn Manson's Twiggy Ramirez and many many more, but it's Masters of Reality that delivers the true core of Goss' and Leamy's musical powers, and the reason that the musical world has been paying close attention for over two decades.

Both improvisation and rhythm have always been major components of the unmistakable Masters of Reality sound, but on their new album, ‘Pine/Cross Dover’ (the band's brand new, two-headed beast of a full-length recording), the group pits the finer elements of the Mahavishnu Orchestra and Public Image Limited against each other. The end result? A Masters of Reality album that rocks, rolls, and grooves like one devilish son of a gun.

Joining Goss and Leamy, includes a host of special guests, including Eagles of Death Metal bassist Brian O’Connor and guitarist Dave Catching, Merle Jagger guitarist Mark Christian, background singers Shawnee Smith and Missi Pyle, as well as former Queens of the Stone Age guitarist Brendon McNichol. With a tour currently being planned, it’s only a matter of time until the latest batch of Masters of Reality classics take on a new life on stage.

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Masters of Reality Live!

US Headlining Tour Dates

11/10/2010 - House Of Blues - Anaheim, CA
11/11/2010 - 4th & B Street - San Diego, CA
11/12/2010 - House Of Blues - Los Angeles, CA
11/16/2010 - El Corazon - Seattle, WA
11/17/2010 - Lola's - Portland, OR
11/20/2010 - Pappy & Harriets, Pioneertown, CA

UK Dates w/ The Cult

1/18/2011 O2 Academy Leeds, UK
1/19/2011 O2 Academy Bristol, UK
1/21/2011 Hammersmith Apollo London, UK
1/22/2011 Cambridge Corn Exchange Cambridge, UK
1/23/2011 O2 Academy Bournemouth Boscombe, UK
1/25/2011 Rock City Nottingham, UK
1/26/2011 Wolverhampton Civic Hall Wolverhampton, UK
1/27/2011 O2 Academy 2 Newcastle, UK
1/29/2011 Academy Glasgow Glasgow, Scotland
1/30/2011 Academy Manchester Manchester, UK

FOLK-ROCK DUO LONG WOODSON TO RELEASE 2ND CD

Folk-rock duo Long Woodson, the prolific pair whose songwriting prowess extends to book-intricate concept albums, will release its second, ROBYVILLE (Robyville Records; Sept. 21, 2010), with a show in Austin to celebrate just two days later.

Long Woodson backed by its band plays at 10 p.m. Thursday, September 23, at Saxon Pub, 1320 S. Lamar Blvd. Cover is $5; information: 512.448.2552. Matt King will play at 8 p.m. and David Beck at midnight.
ROBYVILLE details a fictional West Texas town full of misfits hiding out from mainstream America, each song written about or from the perspective of one of them. Dark lyrics, harmony hooks and gritty vocals paint a picture of survival and hope behind mandolin, Spanish and acoustic guitars, harmonica, and distorted electric guitar.
Matt Long and Gunter Woodson met at The University of Texas and played together in several Austin rock bands. After a time, the duo began to record some of the songs in what has become a growing catalog of co-written material. The result was its first concept album, the acclaimed GIRL UPSTAIRS, which was released in 2009.
ROBYVILLE promises listeners a stimulating journey and a fascinating visit with a colorful cast of characters — with “Nikki,” “Jimi,” “Creole Man” and nine more tracks.
For more information, visit www.longwoodson.com.

Ornette Coleman Receives Honorary Doctorate of Music from the University of Michigan

Music legend Ornette Coleman received an honorary doctorate of music from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.  The Department of Jazz and Contemporary Improvisation of the School of Music, Theatre and Dance congratulates Mr. Coleman on this great honor, his 80th birthday, and for being one of the most important musicians and innovators of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.  The event also included a commencement address by President Barack Obama.

THE OFFICIAL CEREMONY TEXT

“Mr. Coleman, your performances and your path-breaking theories of jazz and music have transformed how musicians play and what listeners hear.  Your self-taught musical education blossomed into a radically novel sound, giving the world musical styles it had never heard before.  In your long career of ongoing creativity, you have played a vital role in preserving and enhancing America’s cultural legacy, and you have cultivated the talent of the future.  The University of Michigan is proud to present you with the honorary degree, Doctor of Music.”


MORE ABOUT ORNETTE COLEMAN

Ornette Coleman is a leading composer and performer of jazz, whose remarkable artistry is admired around the world.  Born in Fort Worth, Texas, in 1930, he taught himself how to play the saxophone and had formed his first band by the age of fourteen.  After touring with a traveling ensemble, he moved to Los Angeles and began to teach himself music theory while working as an elevator operator.  During this period, he performed with a rehearsal ensemble that allowed him to experiment with the new theoretical concepts he was developing.  The result of his self-study was a new freedom in jazz performance that has been described as a radically new concept and style that originated from his musical intuition, combining southwestern country blues and his own highly personal interpretations of music theory.  The compositional voice that Mr. Coleman developed in the 1950s would remain his trademark style and sound throughout his career.  The first of his many influential albums was recorded in 1958, released under the title Something Else, which launched him as a major innovator of jazz, leading to many more albums and a famous breakthrough engagement at the Five Spot Café in New York City, where he moved permanently.  His music, freed from the conventions of harmony, rhythm, and melody, both polarized and transformed the jazz community, and he devoted decades to understanding and discovering the shape of not just jazz, but all music to come.  At the core of his music is his theory of Harmolodics, which addresses the question of the sound and performance of music beyond the melody.  Beyond the twenty albums he released in the 1960s, Mr. Coleman also began to write string quartets, woodwind quintets, and symphonies based on his pioneering theories of musical composition.  His remarkable contributions to music have been recognized by a multitude of honors, including several honorary degrees, appointment as a MacArthur Foundation Fellow, induction into the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and the presentation of the prestigious Praemium Imperiale Award of the Japanese government.  In 2007 he was honored with a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award, and won the Pulitzer Prize in Music in 2007 for his album Sound Grammar.  In 2009 he became the 16th musician in history to be presented with the Miles Davis Award, in recognition for his regeneration of the jazz idiom.  His recent 80th birthday in March was marked with a variety of tributes, from articles, to concerts, to all-day broadcasts of his music.

Teddy Charles Quartet at KItano | NYC

Teddy Charles is considered to be one of the great jazz vibraphonists and composers of all time, playing with such jazz legends as Charles Mingus, Charlie Parker and Miles Davis. As a student at Julliard in the mid 40s, he haunted New York's jazz clubs, occasionally sitting in with the bands on vibes or piano. His break came unexpectedly one night when he was asked to sit in on piano with Coleman Hawkin's band for the overdue Thelonious Monk. Soon after, Charles began to appear regularly with the top jazz groups of the day, Artie Shaw, Benny Goodman, Buddy De Franco, playing alongside and writing for such jazz stars as Coltrane, Parker, Max Roach and Miles Davis. Recently appeared with Max Roach, David Amram, Lee Konitz. In the early 1950s he began leading his own groups, composing, producing and recording original works such as No More Nights, Blues Become Elektra and Word from Bird.

TEDDY CHARLES QUARTET

FRI. & SAT. APRIL 23 & 24 SETS 8:00 PM & 10:00 PM

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