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Spirits Of The Dead's "The Great God Pan!" Single Of The Day On AOL Spinner

Spirits of the Dead is a psychedelic-stoner-folk-rock band with one foot in the electric magic of the sixties/seventies and the other in the modern electric rock sound of 2012.  Guitarist Ole Øvstedal and vocalist Ragnar Vikse formed this genre blurring four-piece in 2007, and within a year they were already touring Scandinavia and Europe to critical acclaim.
Following success on the road, they recorded their first album live using analogue equipment.  It was mastered by George Marino (Led Zeppelin and Jimi Hendrix) giving it a vintage feel. Laden with spider riffs, soaring vocals, progressive interludes and dream-like melancholy.
Spirits of The Dead are unashamedly retro in sound. From the propulsive rhythms of White Lady / Black Rave to the Sabbath-esque doom of the glorious title track, the record basks in authenticity. But they are adding a portion of freshness that bring them out of the retro bag that holds so many striving bands trying to re-capturing the magic.
Influenced by the epic, heavy sounds of Dead Meadow and Black Mountain as much as they are their personal masters of the past – Black Sabbath, Led Zeppelin and King Crimson – the band have put together something wholly convincing and water tight.
Spirits of The Dead self titled album was a well executed and well crafted debut from a band with one eye set on the past and the other fixed firmly forward. Their debut album received great reviews all over the world giving them a growing attention as one to watch.
Voted in as 2010's 50 finest album of Classic Rock Magazine, and also adding a track on their 15 best songs of 2010 CD.
Their second album The Great God Pan is a much more folk, psychedelic and jazzy record. It takes you immediately on a journey through deep forests, over high mountains, builds you beautiful landscapes and tricks you into the darkest corners of Pan's Kingdom.We will reveal no more, the music will tell you the tale.
Spirits of the Dead consists of Ole Øvstedal (guitars), Ragnar Vikse (vocals), Geir Thorstensen (drums) and Kristian Hultgren (Bass).

David Bromberg's USE ME Tapes Friends

When David Bromberg, one of America’s finest roots musicians, emerged from a recording hiatus of 17 years with the solo, acoustic, traditional folk-blues album Try Me One More Time (Appleseed, 2007), fans and critics were thrilled, and the CD was rewarded with a Grammy nomination. For his follow-up album, Use Me, Bromberg chose a different approach: Why not ask some of his favorite singer-songwriters and musicians to write (or choose), produce, and perform on songs tailored to his versatile but distinctive skills as a guitarist and vocalist?

Answering David’s call were well-known artists from the many genres comprising the amorphous “Americana” musical category. Representing contemporary rootsy singer-songwriters: John Hiatt, the first musician Bromberg approached, who penned the pensive “Ride On Out a Ways” for him; for New Orleans “fonk,” Dr. John; there’s three-guitar jam band interplay with Widespread Panic and jug band music with Levon Helm (the sprightly “Bring It With You When You Come,” produced by Grammy-winning Larry Campbell). Linda Ronstadt puts in a rare appearance on a soulful Brook Benton ballad, Los Lobos contribute a Mexican-flavored waltz, Vince Gill and Tim O’Brien take care of the country and bluegrass quotient, Keb’ Mo’ brings the blues, and the hitmaking Butcher Brothers, producers Phil and Joe Nicolo (Bob Dylan, John Lennon, Cypress Hill, Nine Inch Nails), provide the languid R&B groove for the title song, a cover of Bill Withers’ classic “Use Me.”

The resultant album is due for July 12, 2011 release on Appleseed Records. A national tour will ensue.
Standout tracks change with each listening, but some of the high points include the crisp blues shuffle “Tongue,” the album’s lone Bromberg original, with Levon Helm on drums; “You Don’t Wanna Make Me Mad,” featuring David on slide guitar and Dr. John on piano; the ominous slow blues “Diggin’ in the Deep Blue Sea,” updated by Keb’ Mo’ and Gary Nicholson from Larry Davis’ “Texas Flood” to address the dangers of offshore drilling, and the chipper Vince Gill — Guy Clark co-write “Lookout Mountain Girl,” the only song on which David cedes most of the lead guitar duties (to Vince, although David splits the lead with Widespread Panic’s Jimmy Herring on “Old Neighborhood”).
Rather than collating individual instrumental parts literally phoned in to a central location, the recording sessions for Use Me generally took place on each guest artist’s home turf — in Woodstock (Levon Helm), New Orleans (Dr. John), Nashville (John Hiatt, Tim O’Brien, Vince Gill), Los Angeles (Los Lobos), and so on, to retain their regional flavors. For Bromberg, who started his professional career as an accompanist for everyone from Dion and Jay and the Americans to Bob Dylan and Willie Nelson, the sessions were simultaneously a throwback to his sideman days and a sidestep from his own recordings. “As artist and producer, I get to completely mold my vision of how the song should go,” he explains. “The drawback is that I don’t get many ideas that are not my own. It was fascinating for me to see the different approaches that everyone used in production.”
No matter who the producers, songwriters or accompanying musicians are on Use Me, Bromberg’s expressive guitar-playing and “rippling Fred Neil-like baritone that . . . brings warm, reassuring comfort” (Rolling Stone) remain the centerpiece of the CD, diamonds in golden settings.
Born in Philadelphia in 1945 and raised in Tarrytown, NY, “I listened to rock ’n’ roll and whatever else was on the radio,” says Bromberg. “I discovered Pete Seeger and The Weavers and, through them, Reverend Gary Davis. I then discovered Big Bill Broonzy, who led me to Muddy Waters and the Chicago blues. This was more or less the same time I discovered Flatt and Scruggs, which led to Bill Monroe and Doc Watson.”
Bromberg began studying guitar when he was 13 and eventually enrolled in Columbia University as a musicology major. The call of the Greenwich Village folk scene in the mid-’60s drew David to the downtown clubs and coffeehouses, where he could watch and learn from the best performers, including primary sources such as his inspiration and teacher, the Reverend Gary Davis.
Bromberg’s sensitive, blues-based approach to guitar-playing earned him jobs playing the Village “basket houses” for tips, the occasional paying gig, and lots of employment as a backing musician for Tom Paxton, Jerry Jeff Walker and Rosalie Sorrels, among others. He became a first-call, “hired gun” guitarist for recording sessions, playing on hundreds of records by artists including Bob Dylan (New Morning, Self Portrait, Dylan), Link Wray, The Eagles, Ringo Starr, Willie Nelson and Carly Simon. In the early ’90s, David produced an as-yet-unreleased Dylan album, although two tracks have been issued as part of Dylan’s “Bootleg Series.”
An unexpected and wildly successful solo spot at the 1970 Isle of Wight Festival in Great Britain led to a solo deal with Columbia Records, for whom David recorded four albums. His eponymous 1971 debut included the mock-anguished “Suffer To Sing the Blues,” a Bromberg original that became an FM radio staple, and “The Holdup,” a songwriting collaboration with former Beatle George Harrison on which Harrison also played slide guitar. David, who had met the Grateful Dead’s Jerry Garcia at the Woodstock Festival when they both took refuge from the rain in a tepee, wound up with four Dead members, including Garcia, playing on his next two albums.
Bromberg’s range of material, based in the folk and blues idioms, continually expanded with each new album to encompass bluegrass, ragtime, country and ethnic music, and his touring band grew apace. By the mid-’70s, the David Bromberg Big Band included horn-players, a fiddler, and several multi-instrumentalists, including David himself. Among the best-known Bromberg Band graduates: mandolinist Andy Statman, later a major figure in the Klezmer music movement in America, and fiddler Jay Ungar (who wrote the memorable “Ashokan Farewell” for Ken Burns’ PBS documentary, “The Civil War”).
Despite jubilant, loose-limbed concerts and a string of acclaimed albums on the Fantasy label, Bromberg found himself exhausted by the logistics of the music business. “I decided to change the direction of my life,” he explains. So David dissolved his band in 1980, and he and his artist/musician wife, Nancy Josephson, moved from Northern California to Chicago, where David attended the Kenneth Warren School of Violin Making. Though he still toured periodically, the recordings slowed to a trickle and then stopped.
After “too many Chicago winters,” in 2002 David and Nancy moved to Wilmington, Del., where they currently serve as unofficial “artists in residence” and where David established David Bromberg Fine Violins, a retail store and repair shop for high quality instruments. Frequent participation in the city’s weekly jam sessions helped rekindle Bromberg’s desire to perform music “live” again, and the encouragement of fellow musicians Chris Hillman (The Byrds, Desert Rose Band, Flying Burrito Brothers) and bluegrass wizard Herb Pedersen helped nudge him back into the recording studio. The Wilmington jams also led to the formation of Angel Band, fronted by Nancy and two other female vocalists, with David frequently serving as an accompanist.
Bromberg’s participation in his local and musical community has subsequently included a fund-raising music festival (Bromberg’s Big Noise in the Neighborhood) to help renovate a local theater, and a keynote address at this past spring’s Folk Alliance International convention, a non-profit organization of musicians, concert presenters and industry professionals.
David continues his musical revitalization with projects like Use Me, playing solo shows or backed by his own bluegrass quartet and reunions of the David Bromberg Big Band. Use your ears and catch him when you can!

Jóhann Jóhannson To Release The Miners Hymns June 7th

Icelandic composer/arranger/electronics-manipulator Jóhann Jóhannson’s first release for FatCat, The Miners’ Hymns, is the score to an exciting collaboration with filmmaker Bill Morrison (best known for his masterpiece Decasia, heralded by the Village Voice as “the most widely-acclaimed American avant-garde film of the fin-de-siecle”). Their film/music project treats the history of Northeast England’s mining community using gorgeous found footage and a brass-based score, which moves from dark and brooding minimalism to moments of rousing transcendence. The Miners’ Hymns album will be released in the U.S. on June 7.

Centered around the Durham coalfield in Northeast England, The Miners’ Hymns film focuses on the hardships of pit work, the powerful role trade unions have historically played in bettering the lives of miners, and the trade unions’ battles with police during the famous 1984 strikes. The film was initially commissioned for Durham County (UK) Council’s International Brass Festival, which incorporated the annual Miners’ Gala into a program celebrating the cultural history of mining with a strong focus on the regional tradition of colliery brass bands. It was created from BFI, BBC, and other archival footage and produced by British artist organization Forma. Immaculately edited, and almost entirely in black-and-white, the film intercuts footage spanning the past 100 years, serving, as Jóhannson puts it, as “a kind of requiem for a disappearing industry, but also a celebration of the culture, life, and struggle of coal miners.”

The Miners’ Hymns marks a welcome return to brass instrumentation for Jóhannson, whose recent work has paired his electronics primarily with strings. Performed and record live by a sixteen-piece brass ensemble (whose ranks included players in the current incarnation of a brass band started by miners in 1877) led by Iceland’s Gudni Franzson, the score is at times lamenting, lyrical, almost droning; elsewhere led by sweepingly triumphant chords and pulse-quickening crescendo. Combined with the ensemble and the huge Durham Cathedral organ, Jóhannson’s own subtle electronics peek through gaps in the score like shafts of life through the church’s stained-glass windows, adding quiet, otherworldly brightness.

The beautifully-packaged CD release of The Miners’ Hymns includes liner notes giving an overview of the historical importance of brass band music in the history of English coalmining and the rise of trade unions, as well as archival photos, film stills, and shots of the recorded performance inside the great Cathedral.

Jóhannson's music has also recently been used for film in a quite different context, soundtracking a much talked-about trailer for the blockbuster film Battle: Los Angeles; watch the trailer here.

The Miners’ Hymns is a featured selection of this year’s Tribeca Film Festival. Jóhann Jóhannson will be touring later this year in support of the album.

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The Miners’ Hymns at Tribeca Film Festival:

4/22 – Clearview Chelsea 5 (7:00 pm)

4/25 – Clearview Chelsea 9 (7:30 pm)

4/28 – Clearview Chelsea 8 (12:45 pm)

The Miners’ Hymns Tracklisting:

1. They Being Dead yet Speaketh

2. An Injury To One Is The Concern Of All

3. Freedom From Want and Fear

4. There is No Safe Side but the Side of Truth

5. Industrial and Provident, We Unite to Assist Each Other

6. The Cause of Labour is the Hope of the World

Jason Bonham's Led Zeppelin Experience

JASON BONHAM’S LED ZEPPELIN EXPERIENCE celebrates the life and music of his father--the legendary Led Zeppelin drummer John Bonham.

Shadow Shadow Shade Release White Horse Trilogy & Debut Album

Los Angeles’ majestic septet Shadow Shadow Shade (formerly known as Afternoons) are prepping the release of their eagerly awaited, self-titled debut release.  Those who have seen their acclaimed live show know what to expect:  a lush sound that is both grand in spectacle and remarkably intimate.  With seven members that often sing in unison, the group’s haunting melodies sculpt an ethereal, choir-like effect.  Shadow Shadow Shade will be released on October 5th through the group’s own label, Public Records.  It will be available via Junket Boy and at CIMS stores nationwide as well as select additional indie outlets.  It was produced by Grammy-winning Producer/Mixer/Engineer/Musician and SSS member, Tom Biller (Karen O, Liars, Jon Brion, Sean Lennon, Kanye West).

Before the album is released the band is unveiling the three-part epic, post-apocalyptic short film known as the White Horse Trilogy that features several of their songs.  The clip stars Jason Ritter (of NBC’s upcoming drama “The Event”) and Anna WilsonWhite Horse’s director Michael Graham describes it as “an existential science fiction film that personifies and investigates the inner struggle one might go through under the distress of being ripped apart from their lover by the current world they live in, most importantly - war.”  The film is set in the future during World War III, when an unknown force has enslaved the human race.

SSS began as an art project amongst likeminded friends before evolving into an actual band that performed and recorded.  Upon hearing their demos, artist Shepard Fairey became one of the band’s early supporters  He soon designed posters for them that ended up getting plastered all over their hometown of LA.  After playing just one show, the group was offered the coveted residency at Spaceland and subsequently sold out all four weeks – this led to the SSS being invited to perform at IFC’s 2010 SXSW Showcase.

The group has created a stirring pastiche of sounds that takes cues from traditions such as psychedelia, orchestral music, shoegaze, opera, and indie rock among others.  Their enigmatic lyrics seem to have been plucked from a classic, timeless novel that hasn’t been written yet, and every song they compose builds towards a thrilling catharsis.  Click HERE to stream/download the mp3 for the album’s first single, “Say Yes.”

Shadow Shadow Shade Tour Dates:

10/8 - Santa Cruz, CA @ Rio Theater
10/10 - Portland, OR @Mississippi Studios
10/11 - Seattle, WA @ The High Dive
10/13 - San Francisco, CA @ Red Devil Lounge
10/14 - Los Angeles, CA @ Echoplex
10/15 - San Diego, CA @ Soda Bar

Karl Denson's Tiny Universe at the Fox Theatre

Like a Super Nova burning bright in the night sky comes Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe.  Based out of San Diego, KDTU began its journey in 1998 after bandleader Karl Denson decided to change gears five years after he’d help create The Greyboy Allstars. GBA had proven themselves as the ultimate party band, spreading their “West Coast Boogaloo” style all over the world, making “Jazz” a dance term once again. Karl set out to take this formula to the next level by putting more emphasis on vocals and adding some funk, r&b and hip hop elements. It turned out to be a winning combination which set KDTU on the top of the heap in the touring world from 1999 through 2005. In 2005 Karl decided to get back to his roots and work in a smaller jazzier setting.  During 2006 and 2007 Karl led KD3, a trio configuration featuring Sax, Organ and Drums. This led to the 2007 release of KD3’s  “Lunar Orbit”, an album which was a great critical success. In 2008, Karl rejoined his former boss Lenny Kravitz and spent the year country hopping through Europe and North America. In 2009 Karl went back into the studio and conjured up what is being hailed as the most soulful KDTU adventure yet, “Brother’s Keeper” which was released Sept 15th, 2009.

Thursday June 24, 9:00pm
KARL DENSON'S TINY UNIVERSE
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All Ages / GA / $15 ADV weekend on-sale (June 4 - 6) / $20 ADV & DOS

Tickets on sale June 4 at the Fox Theatre box office | Internet 24-7 at www.foxtheater.com | Phone: During box office hours: 303.443.3399

The Yardbirds on tour this Spring

The Yardbirds will be playing east coast and Ohio dates this May.  A true institution, in the brief period from 1963 to 1968, The Yardbirds made an indelible mark on the music and culture of the time, and then on future generations.

To the casual music fan, The Yardbirds are best known as the band that honed the skills of future “guitar gods” Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page; and for their slew of chart hits, including “For Your Love,” “Heart Full of Soul,” "Shapes of Things,"  “I'm A Man,” and “Over Under Sideways Down.” However, led by core members and songwriters Jim McCarty (drums), Chris Dreja (rhythm guitar/bass) and the late Keith Relf (vocals/harmonica), the band's experimental explorations also provided the crucial link between British R&B, Psychedelic Rock, and Heavy Metal, while pioneering the use of innovations like fuzz tone, feedback and distortion.  Even their 1968 break-up set the stage for Rock 'n' Roll's future…leading Jimmy Page to form the New Yardbirds, later re-christened Led Zeppelin.

Reuniting decades later, McCarty and Dreja with a new generations of talented players including the raw talents of young lead guitarist Ben King, bassist Dave Smale, and vocalist/harmonica player Andy Mitchell, the group has been steadily touring and making new music.

The Yardbirds' 2003 CD, BIRDLAND on Steve Vai's Favored Nations label featured guest appearances from Vai, and friends Brian May, Joe Satriani, and Slash.

In 2007 Favored Nations released the YARDBIRDS: LIVE AT BB KINGS, again showing the power of the band, and its legacy of great songs.

This season, The Yardbirds return to the States under the leadership purposeful and insightful Dreja and McCarty and the future music superstars: King, Smale and Mitchell.

May 21          Parilla Center                                Rockville, MD
May 22          Chesapeake Blues Fest                  Annapolis, MD
May 23          Tangiers                                      Akron, OH             
May 25          Sellersville Theatre                        Sellersville, PA
May 26          BB Kings                                      New York, NY
May 27          Boulton Center                             Bay Shore, NY          
May 28          Showcase Live                              Foxborough, MA       
May 30          Remember The Music/Heroes         Virginia Beach, VA