rock

Tracy Bonham & Company + Tony Trischka

Join multi instrumentalist Tracy Bonham for new music from her upcoming release Masts Of Manhattan as well as old favorites and covers with new twists. She has an amazing line up: Nicole Federici: viola, violin. Dan Cho (Regina Spektor): cello. Mike Duclos: bass. Konrad Meissner: drums (Matt Nathanson). Tracy weaves in and out of alternative rock, where she is most commonly known, to bright moments of Classical, Eastern European, and Gypsy music in just a few brushstrokes. Tracy and her band will be joined by special guests Tony Trischka on banjo. Come join Tracy and her friends every first Wednesday of each month for the next four months, and watch collaborations unfold.

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CORNELIA STREET CAFÉ
29 Cornelia Street, NYC, New York |  212-989-9319
http://www.corneliastreetcafe.com

BoomBox Announces March Colorado Tour

Featuring Producer Russ Randolph and Vocalist/Guitarist Zion Rock Godchaux, BoomBox draws their inspiration from their hometown roots in Muscle Shoals, AL – an area known for inspiring the worlds most legendary recordings of the 60’s, 70’s 80’s and into the present. The powerhouse duo draws their inspiration from their hometown roots and is recognized for infusing elements of Motown, Folk, and Rock into an electronic music blender with heavy bass undertones and ethereal vocals for a dance party vibe that has fans coming out in drones.

Using only word of mouth buzz, BoomBox has built a strong national following with a history of packed performances around the country. Locally, the band boasts two sold out shows in Denver last November, as part of their annual urban electronic festival RE:Convergence, which took place at Cervantes.

BoomBox will be performing with special opening guests BLVD along the western slopes this spring in support of their latest release, downriverelectric, which is expected to hit the streets in advance of the Colorado tour.

COLORADO TOUR:
3/9 - Three20South, Breckenridge, CO
3/10 - Belly Up, Aspen, CO
3/11 - Aggie Theater, Fort Collins, CO
3/12 - Fox Theatre, Boulder, CO
3/13 - Bluebird Theater, Denver, CO
3/14 - Abbey Theatre, Durango, CO

Here We Go Magic Play BOULDER At Fox Theater

It's been a big year for Here We Go Magic following the release of their much celebrated self-titled debut (Western Vinyl), and now they have their sights firmly set on 2010 with a new album, a new record label, and an ever expanding sound. Having just signed to Secretly Canadian, the band is targeting Spring of 2010 to release their highly anticipated follow-up to 2009's breakthrough record.

The band have spent much of the year on the road touring with indie giants including Grizzly Bear and are currently supporting The Walkmen before playing Austin City Limits.

Here We Go Magic are also hard at work recording the self-produced sophomore album in a house they've commandeered in upstate New York, and while the first record was the result of Luke Temple getting creative in his bedroom, this release is a fully fledged team effort.

With an eye towards 2010 the band is looking forward to expanding their audience as their unique sound continues to permeate throughout the indie world.

US Tour Dates:

3/13: Rock N Roll Hotel, Washington D.C

3/14: Local 506, Carrboro, NC
4/05: Jefferson Theater, Charlottesville, VA
4/06: Grey Eagle, Asheville, NC 
4/09: The Social, Orlando, FL
4/10: Jax Live, Jacksonville, FL
4/11: Club Downunder,  Tallahassee, FL
4/13: Walters on Washington, Houston, TX
4/14: The Independent, Austin, TX
4/16: The Clubhouse, Phoenix, AZ
4/20: Urban Lounge, Salt Lake
4/21: Fox Theater, Boulder
4/24: High Noon Saloon, Madison, WI
4/25: Metro, Chicago, IL
4/26: Radio Radio, Indianapolis, IN
4/27: Lee's Palace, Toronto, ON
4/28: Petit Campus. Montreal
5/01: Paradise Rock Club, Boston, MA

Live Trey Anastasio Webcast Tonight!

Tune in to iClips.net for this very special FREE presentation of Trey Anastasio and Classic TAB Live from the Pageant in St. Louis, MO on February 23, 2010. Start times are 8:30 p.m. EST, 7:30 CST, 6:30 MST, & 5:30 PST.

Classic TAB, which has backed Trey on many of his solo projects, recently hit the road following the triumphant return of Phish in 2009. This tour is the first for Trey Anastasio and Classic TAB since they went out as a quartet last fall.

ALSO:

Trey Anastasio to Present at Rock n' Roll Hall of Fame: Trey Anastasio is inducting rock group Genesis into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame next month.  The presenters were announced Tuesday by the hall, which is based in Cleveland.  Wyclef Jean will honor Jimmy Cliff. Barry and Robin Gibb of the Bee Gees will induct ABBA. Green Day's Billie Joe Armstrong is set to honor The Stooges. And Jackson Browne will induct David Geffen.  The induction ceremony takes place March 15 in New York and will air live on Fuse TV at 8:30 p.m. EST.

Anne McCue's new CD, 'Broken Promise Land,' returns to raw sound

Anne McCue describes her new album, Broken Promise Land, due out on May 18, 2010 on Flying Machine Records Records, as “a bit dirty, a bit rockin’, a bit swampy and a bit bluesy, with a touch of mysteriousness to it.”

What isn’t mysterious is McCue’s musical talent and range. She was voted the Roots Music Association’s Folk Artist of the Year in 2008, performed in a Jimi Hendrix tribute at the 2007 International Guitar Festival and was included in the Four Decades of Folk Rock box set alongside the likes of Bob Dylan and Wilco. Heart’s Nancy Wilson has described her as “my Aussie clone,” while Americana icon Lucinda Williams had this to say: “Initially, her stunning voice hooked me in. Then I got inside the songs. The first chance I got, I went to see her perform . . . I was floored! The combination of her tomboyish beauty mixed with the precision and assertiveness with which she approached the guitar, her surrounding languid and earthy vocals created an intoxicating blend.”

The new, self-produced album is one that she has long wanted to make. Combining heartfelt songwriting with gritty guitar playing, the record harkens back to McCue’s breakout Roll release, although she says that the new disc’s sound is even more raw than its predecessor. While earlier albums covered a range of roots-rock styles, Broken Promise Land focuses on McCue’s hard-charging “cosmic biker rock” sound.

The new disc lets McCue showcase her rockin’ ways and six-string virtuosity. The title track cuts loose with a blistering Hendrix-like bluesy guitar solo. The first single, “Don’t Go To Texas (Without Me),” boasts the dirty guitar sound of late ’60s English bands like the Yardbirds and the Rolling Stones, while “The Old Man Talkin’” exudes a slinky J.J. Cale vibe.

The music’s strong, visceral energy results from a strategy to record as much as possible live. “I didn’t want to have a lot of layers. I wanted it to be pretty much what I can do on stage,” McCue asserts. She sought to capture the vibe of the old Albert King albums that she loves, which were recorded in only a few days, and she included a brass section in the sessions. By recording to tape, McCue also created the textures and dimension that she admires in T-Bone Burnett’s work.

On Broken Promise Land, McCue utilized the veteran rhythm section of Bones Hillman (Midnight Oil) and drummer Ken Coomer (Uncle Tupelo/Wilco). “Bones and Ken are very developed as musicians,” she says. “It’s great to have that type of depth to the musicianship.” This powerful trio demonstrates their musical breadth throughout this disc, whether it’s building “The Lonely One” into a surging rock ballad, conjuring a spooky atmosphere in Amelia White’s “Motorcycle Dream” or roaring through a cover of Rose Tattoo’s “Rock ’n’ Roll Outlaw.”

McCue’s love for music was nurtured in Sydney, Australia, where she grew up in a house filled with music. Her father, while not a professional musician, played a variety of instruments and her mother sang in the church choir. All of her seven older siblings were heavily into music too, and sounds ranging from Billie Holiday to Led Zeppelin filled the McCue home. “Every type of music except hardcore blues,” the blues-loving McCue admits, “so I definitely didn’t get burned out on it as a child.”

Although McCue played guitar growing up, she wasn’t encouraged to be a musician. A longtime film buff, she got a degree in film studies at Sydney’s University of Technology. Her cinema studies are an influence. “To me, my songs are like short films,” she reveals, “I try to be very visual and cinematic with my music and now I am making videos for the songs too.”

After college, McCue joined an all-female band, Girl Monstar, which was very popular in the Australian indie rock scene. She later became a part of the folk-rock trio Eden AKA that performed on the Lilith Fair tour and recorded a never-released album for Columbia Records. Her ill-fated Columbia experience landed her in America, where she set up shop in Los Angeles and became a vital part of the city’s roots music scene. During her time in Southern California, she recorded two attention-grabbing albums — 2004’s Roll and 2006’s Koala Motel.
Both releases accumulated a bevy of critical accolades. Entertainment Weekly exclaimed that McCue “represents a new generation of hard-bitten, country-inflected singer-songsmiths,” while Billboard heralded her as  “the virtual definition of ‘triple threat.’ A potent singer, thoughtful songwriter and tough guitarist.” Austin Chronicle critic Jim Caligiuri noted that “these days, there are very few women working the same territory as McCue, who can combine tough and vulnerable. That she does it with poise and a self-deprecating sense of humor makes her an artist worth seeing again.”
A few years ago, McCue moved to Nashville, a place she finds quite fertile for making music. “There’s more room to think, more creative space,” she explains, “but there are so many great musicians that it really raises the bar and makes you want to get better.” Last year, she self-produced a limited-distribution acoustic album, East of Electric, on which she played a variety of instruments. A terrific example of her folkier side, it stands as a quiet side-trip to the full-bodied rock ferocity that Broken Promise Land delivers.
“This is the kind of music I love playing,” says McCue talking enthusiastically about her Broken Promise Land songs. “There’s nothing I could look more forward to than playing a whole set of bluesy, rocky, swampy music.”
See the video for McCue’s “Don’t Go to Texas (Without Me)” right here.

Kuan announce March tour dates

If you watch the audience at a Kuan gig, something unusual happens to the socially diverse crowd that tends to make up their fan base. The punk rockers, prog rockers, hipsters, b-boys and metalheads all react in about the sameway: they start by nodding their heads. Then they sway a little. Then, they do whatever the word 'dance' means to each of them. They smile.

When one thinks of post-rock, post-punk, or avant-garde jazz, a word that does not often come to mind is joy. But that is Kuan's music. It's their joy, but it never fails to infect the audience. Brett Nagafuchi loses himself in his exultant, wicked drumming. Chip Heck collapses to the stage floor, shit-eating grin on his face as he alternates between shredding and coaxing strange ambient squeals from his pedals. Bryan Wright's bass undergirds and warms the thunder, stepping with a lightness his bobbing, peaceful frame belies. Paul Larkowski's lead guitar guides the ensemble with the gentleness and power of the best soloists in rock or jazz, tying what threatens at any one moment to explode into a beautiful mess together into a tight groove, the very thing you wanted to hear, but didn't know until you heard it.

Kuan is a Buddhist term. It translates as "wordless contemplation." But it is clear that lyricless as they are, Kuan's songs speak to their audiences. There is an urban legend that says when John Coltrane would perform one of his trademark hour-long solos while with the Miles Davis Quintet, someone once asked Miles "Why'd you let him play so long?" Miles's reply: "He wasn't finished saying what he had to say."

All veterans of Dayton's post-rock, punk and jazz scenes, Kuan formed originally as a three-piece, adding Wright in 2008. The quartet's post-rock, punk and jazz-influenced heavy groove has been compared by critics to Tortoise, June of 44, Do Make Say Think, and Fugazi. The Dayton-based band claims all of these, as well as Miles Davis, John and Alice Coltrane and Aphex Twin as influences. They attract fans from across the genres. Now gearing up for a second tour, they're preparing a vegetable-oil-powered van to reduce the high carbon footprint of touring.

Kuan Tour Dates
Mar 5 - Southgate House-Parlour - Newport, KY
Mar 6 - Rock Room - Pittsburgh, PA
Mar 8 - Chanti Loft - Ithaca, NY
Mar 9 - Trash Bar - Brooklyn, NY
Mar 10 - O'Brien's - Boston, MA
Mar 11 - The Khyber - Philadelphia, PA
Mar 12 - The Velvet Lounge - Washington, DC
Mar 19 - Baba Budans - Cincinnati, OH
Mar 26 - Chip's Basement - Dayton, OH
Apr 10 - Blind Bob's - Dayton, OHApr 23 - Reggie's - Chicago, IL

Post Furthur NYC show with Licorice

Licorice will be playing a post-Furthur show at the Sullivan Hall in New York City on February 23rd.  Their first set will start at 1AM and go into the night.   If you're looking for a fun post-Furthur show, here's your chance. Go check them out.

about Licorice:

On the heels of the release of their first studio EP, the critically acclaimed A Million Grains of Sand, Licorice's current momentum is exponential. They perform as a dynamic live force with David Lott (guitar, vocals), Matt Epstein (bass) and Josh Bloom (drums, vocals) at the core. The Brooklyn based rock outfit has displayed their musical chops on the world famous stages of The Blue Note, Knitting Factory, Brooklyn Academy of Music and other festivals and settings. They've shared the stage with legends and contemporaries, including: Larry Coryell, Roy Hargrove, Mike Dillon, and DJ Logic. Their songwriting, an amalgam of Americana, Blues, Jazz, and Rock, is the key vehicle to their original sound as a group, as they prove there are no musical boundaries. Together, they conquer complex originals, covers, jazz standards, and fusion 'episodes', on top of barn-burning rockers, anthems, and ballads - all with power, pocket and ease, with a cohesive and delicate touch. While they plan their next studio venture check them out live or online!

Collectors' Choice introduces CCM Live label: J. WInter, Hot Tuna, Poco. J. Denver

Collectors’ Choice Music, the label that’s come to be known for compelling and often unexpected CD reissues, has announced the launch of Collectors’ Choice Music Live, a new label devoted to releasing great live performances, most of which have never previously been commercially available.

The series will launch April 20 with the release of four CDs: Johnny Winter And’s Live at the Fillmore East 10/3/70; Poco’s Live at Columbia Studios, Hollywood 9/30/71; Hot Tuna’s Live at the New Orleans House, Berkeley, CA September 1969; and John Denver’s Live at Cedar Rapids, 12/10/87.

According to Collectors’ Choice Music GM Gordon Anderson, “After some 15 years of reissuing albums and compiling artists, we’re convinced that some of the biggest remaining veins of gold in the vaults are the live shows that a lot of labels recorded of their artists in their prime, particularly those who made their reputation with improvisational prowess and/or ever-changing set lists. These first four releases on our new Collectors’ Choice Music Live label certainly fit that description.”

Johnny Winter And — Live at the Fillmore East 10/3/70: To commemorate the release of his Johnny Winter And album, Texas blues guitarist/singer Johnny Winter played some shows at New York’s Fillmore East, some of which were compiled on 1971’s Live Johnny Winter And, a classic live album of the era to which this release makes a nice bookend. He had just formed a new band consisting of former member of the McCoys (“Hang on Sloopy”) including Rick Derringer on guitar, bassist Randy Jo Hobbs, and drummer Randy Zehringer. Although the McCoys were none too familiar with Winter’s work, they proved quick studies and entered the studio to make the album Johnny Winter And within three weeks. The New York Times reviewed the Fillmore show, citing “a considerable improvement over Winter’s previous band. Winter and [Derringer] played solos back at each other, simultaneously and in alternation.” The live album contains the Winter hit “Rock and Roll Hoochie Coo” and his take on Bob Dylan’s “Highway 61” alongside  blues classics “Rollin’ and Tumblin’,” “It’s My Own Fault” and “Good Morning Little Schoolgirl.”

•Poco —Live at Columbia Studios, Hollywood, 9/30/71: In the fall of ’71, Poco was arguably the most popular of the first generation country-rock bands. By then, their album Deliverin’ had cracked the Top 30 and Poco thanked its label, Epic Records, with a private showcase at the CBS Records’ Hollywood studio.  “We just set up as we would have for a small club,” recalls frontman Richie Furay, whose bandmates included guitarist/singer Paul Cotton (from the Illinois Speed Press), bassist Tim Schmidt (later of the Eagles), pedal steel player Rusty Young and drummer/vocalist George Grantham. By this time, Poco was evolving from country-rock towards an edgier rock sound. Says Furay, “Though we were innovators of the L.A. ‘country-rock’ sound, we weren’t going top be pigeonholed into being a one-sound band.” The 14 songs they performed for label employees that day were a solid cross-section of tunes that had appeared on its first four albums including the medley “Hard Luck Child/Child’s Claim to Fame/Pickin’ Up the Pieces,” plus “I Guess You Made It,” “A Man Like Me,” “Ol’ Forgiver,” “Heart That Music,” “Hurry Up,” “You Are the One” and more — an hour of music in all.

Hot Tuna: Live at the New Orleans House, Berkeley, CA September 1969: Hot Tuna was, of course, the blues band-within-a-band side project of Jefferson Airplane’s Jorma Kaukonen and Jack Casady that outlasted the parent band and continues to this day. Interestingly, the duo’s first commercial album, which made it to #30 on the Billboard pop album chart, was recorded live at Berkeley’s New Orleans House, but a lot more material was taped than was released. Much of it is issued for the first time on this 68-minute CD, which consists entirely of previously unreleased recordings. Explaining why they recorded their debut album was recorded live, Kaukoken says, “We tend to go places . . . and you lose a bit of that when you work in the studio. And it was cheaper too!” Of the 13 songs on this CD, six — “Death Don’t Have No Mercy,” “Winin’ Boy Blues,” “Uncle Sam Blues,” “I Know You Rider,” “Don’t You Leave Me Here” and “How Long Blues” — were included on the first Hot Tuna album, though the versions here are selected from different performances than the ones used on that LP.  Other songs include Blind Boy Fuller’s “Keep On Truckin’,” Rev. Gary Davis’ “Keep Our Lamps Trimmed and Burning” and “Candy Man,” and Blind Blake’s “That’ll Never Happen No More.”

John Denver: Live at Cedar Rapids, December 10, 1987: What is the sound of an audience eating out of the palm of a performer’s hand? Utter silence. And that’s what was heard during the two-hour-plus Iowa concert that comprises this two-CD set.  By 1987, Denver’s days as a Top 40 hitmaker were a decade in the past, but he remained a solid concert draw as a beloved, thoroughly American artist with a permanent place in the history of pop. It says much about Denver’s songwriting that, with the exception of half a dozen songs on which he’s accompanied by string quartet, he delivers two hours of solo music just his voice and 12-string guitar. The hits are here but so are new songs, some early-repertoire nuggets and a well-chosen cover or two.  Included are “Farewell Andromeda (Welcome to My Morning,” ”Take Me Home Country Roads,” “Rocky Mountain High,” “Annie’s Song,” “Love Is the Master,” “Mother Nature’s Son,” “Blow Up Your TV (Spanish Pipe Dream),” “Shanghai Breezes,” “Ohio” and more.

The Infamous Stringdusters Reach New Heights w/ Things That Fly

About the most important question a young bluegrass band faces right out of the gate is whether they can play. The Infamous Stringdusters wasted no time in providing their answer—an emphatic “yes”—winning IBMA Album, Song and Emerging Artist of the Year the very same year they released their debut, Fork In the Road. On Things That Fly, their third album, due out April 20, 2010 on Sugar Hill, they venture into virtually uncharted territory for an acoustic group: a sonically and thematically expansive album that lends itself to absorbed listening from start to finish, much like the great rock albums do.

Holed up in the Charlottesville, Virginia studio Haunted Hollow, with significant preproduction under their belts and Gary Paczosa (Nickel Creek, Dixie Chicks, Tim O’Brien) on board as engineer and co-producer, the ‘Dusters did things they’d never done before: guitarist Andy Falco put his hidden keyboard talents to use on smoldering organ parts; voices and instruments alike were splashed with reverb; and, though the band has no shortage of quality lead singers in fiddler Jeremy Garrett, dobro player Andy Hall and upright bassist Travis Book, a few fine-singing friends—country standout Dierks Bentley, Americana songwriter-chanteuse Sarah Siskind and Crooked Still frontwoman Aoife O’Donovan added novel tones.  All this—and more, much more—makes for a lush, new ‘Dusters experience.

Says Book, “I think string bands have a tendency to feel like when they go to record, doing anything that they can’t necessarily replicate 100 percent live is off-limits. Instead of saying ‘This is how it sounds when the six of us play it standing around in a circle, so we’re just going to put mics up and capture it and that’s going to be it,’ we really got deeper in the production aspect.”

Factor in that every member of the band—rounded out by de facto tour videographer Chris Pandolfi (banjo) and Jesse Cobb (mandolin)—is a stylish, consummate picker with a hardly strictly bluegrass background, as well as a skilled songwriter, and you see that this band is genuinely built for breadth. “We wanted to make sure everyone had writing input on the record,” Hall relates. “We’d never done that before, and it’s a lot of why we started the band.”

Speaking of formidable rock albums, the 'Dusters drew the second track on Things That Fly from U2's Joshua Tree. Not only did they transform "In God's Country" into their own propulsive, virtuosic vehicle, they wrote transcendent anthems in a similar spirit: "Taking a Chance on the Truth" and "Love One Another." Surprising covers, unusual arrangements and other departures from the expected make Things That Fly something different - namely a sign that they've elevated their sound and set their sights higher than ever before.

Upcoming Tour Dates:


2/4 - Lexington, KY 
2/5 - Granville, OH
2/6 - Cleveland, OH 
2/8 - Ames, IA 
2/10 - Billings, MT
2/12+13 - Big Sky, MT
2/16+17 - Steamboat Springs, CO 
2/19 - Logan, UT
2/20 - Salt Lake City, UT
2/21 - Park City, UT
2/25 - Eugene, OR
2/26+27 - Tacoma, WA
3/17 - Tuolumne, CA
3/18 - Crystal Bay, NV
3/19 - Grass Valley, CA
3/20 - Felton, CA
3/21 - Berkeley, CA
3/22 - West Hollywood, CA
3/24 - Albuquerque, NM
3/25 - Durango, CO
3/26 - Telluride, CO
3/27 - Glenwood Springs, CO
3/28 - Denver, CO

Earl Greyhound To Release Sophomore LP "Suspicious Package"

EARL GREYHOUND is pleased to announce the release of Suspicious Package, a blistering rock inferno spun out of the Brooklyn trio’s inspired and innovative rock-n-roll imagination machine.  Suspicious Package was recorded at Red Bull Studios in Santa Monica, under the nimble and keen producerly auspices of Dave Schiffman (Mars Volta, Red Hot Chili Peppers, System of a Down).

Earl Greyhound formed in 2002 with the collaboration of songwriters Matt Whyte and Kamara Thomas, who began performing regularly as a duo in NYC. All the while, they were crafting the unique sound and songs that would form the foundation for a colossal rock band. Their influences swept from the strident English three-and four-pieces of the 70’s, to the dark pop and heavy grunge grooves of the 90’s, to the transcendental, noisy acid sounds of modern rock.

In 2005, EG recorded their first album, Soft Targets, but they also hit their first snag when drummer Chris Bear left to pursue his fortunes with the band Grizzly Bear. Reluctant to release the album without a permanent drummer, Matt and Kamara vowed to play relentlessly until their dream drummer found them. Guitar player Kirk Douglass (The Roots) witnessed a show and brought his friend and Gold Crowns band mate Ricc Sheridan to the next few gigs. Ricc says, “I awoke from a dream one night, and I knew this was my band.” A few weeks later, a rockneck-inducing jam confirmed that the band had found its soul mate, and they hit the ground running.  Soft Targets and EG’s wrecking ball of a live show earned them oodles of fans and critical acclaim from The New Yorker, SPIN, Rolling Stone, Brooklyn Vegan and Pitchfork, among others. The next three years were spent touring the US, Canada and Japan as well as opening for Gov’t Mule, Chris Cornell and Saul Williams.


Suspicious Package is Earl Greyhound’s sophomore release. The album marks a turning point in the band’s maturation since the benefit of Mr. Sheridan’s full creative collaboration. Listeners will notice a marked expansion into the higher reaches of the sonic territories. Heavy, dark, groovy and grand—Suspicious Package is a reminder that though ROCK is still only a four-letter word, it can still pack a load of splendor.

US TOUR

Jan 30 - Brooklyn Bowl - Brooklyn, NY
Mar 23 - Harro East Theatre & Ballroom w/ Coheed and Cambrial - Rochester, NY
Mar 24 - The Westcott Theater w/ Coheed and Cambria - Syracuse, NY
Mar 25 - Northern Lights w/ Cohee d and Cambria - Clifton Park, NY
Mar 26 - Higher Ground w/ Coheed and Cambria - South Burlington, VT
Mar 28 - Port City Music Hall w/ Coheed and Cambria - Portland, ME
Mar 29 Webster Theater w/ Cohee d and Cambria - Hartford, CT
Mar 30 Hardware Bar w/ Coheed a nd Cambria - Scranton, PA
Mar 31 - Music Hall of Williamsbu rg w/ Coheed and Cambria - Brooklyn, New York
Jun 4 - Wakarusa Festival - Ozark, ArkansasJun 5 - Wakarusa Festival - Ozark, Arkansas