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National Jazz Museum September 2011 Schedule

For a combination of jazz dialogue, education, and live performance, look no further than the National Jazz Museum in September.

Our flagship conversation series, Harlem Speaks, first features soprano saxophonist Jane Ira Bloom in our first of several Harlem Speaks @ The New School events, which will occur in Greenwich Village (details below). Next, elder master Jimmy Heath will regale the live audience at our Visitor’s Center with tales from his illustrious history as a jazz artist.

Our Jazz for Curious Listeners series focuses on four classic recordings—Kind of Blue, Art Tatum: Solo Masterpieces, Red Clay, and Jazz at Massey Hall. The monthly Saturday panel peers into the legacy of jazz at Carnegie Hall.

We launch a new series this month, Tune Talk. We’ll find out where our favorite jazz songs come from and how they evolve into standards. This month’s featured song: “Body and Soul.”
Last but not least, our collaborative series with the Rubin Museum of Art—Harlem in the Himalayas—features alto saxophonist David Binney’s quartet and some special guests.
Mark your calendars, and bring some friends to share in pleasurable listening and learning!

Tuesday, September 6, 2011
Jazz for Curious Listeners
How to Listen to Jazz: “Kind of Blue”
7:00– 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center 
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C) 
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300
Whether you’re new to jazz, or a seasoned listener, you’ll appreciate this session on the best-selling jazz recording of all time. Recorded and released in 1959, leader Miles Davis’s Kind of Blue has stood the test of time as a jazz classic.

Why? Is it the fact that the ensemble played a “modal” approach instead of a string of chord changes as was prominent in the bebop style? Is it the fact that legendary artists participated: trumpeter Davis, tenor saxophonist John Coltrane, alto saxophonist Cannonball Adderley, pianists Bill Evans and Wynton Kelly, bassist Paul Chambers, and drummer Jimmy Cobb? Was it songs such as “So What,” “Freddie Freeloader,” and “All Blues”? All of the above?

Come discover the answers, as explained by Executive Director Loren Schoenberg.

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

Jazz for Curious Listeners
How to Listen to Jazz: “Art Tatum: Solo Masterpieces”
7:00– 8:30pm
Location: : NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Pianist Art Tatum’s prodigious technical facility was awe-inspiring. His inventiveness, harmonic acuity, and melodicism puts him at the top of the jazz piano mountain.

The recordings you’ll hear tonight are from the latter part of his life. Impresario Norman Granz produced these dates, which displays Tatum’s marvelous agility and artistry at a peak.

We invite you to an enlightening listening and learning session that will take you inside of the genius of one of the most startling artists of the 20th century.

Thursday, September 15, 2011

Harlem Speaks
Jane Ira Bloom
6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: The New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music
(55 West 13th St., Arnhold Hall, 5th floor )
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Soprano saxophonist/composer Jane Ira Bloom has been full-time faculty at the New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music since 1989, and holds degrees from Yale University and Yale School of Music. She is a pioneer in the use of live electronics and movement in jazz and winner of the Guggenheim Fellowship in music composition, the Mary Lou Williams Jazz Award for lifetime service to jazz, Downbeat International Critics Poll & Jazz Journalists Award for soprano saxophone, the IWJ Jazz Masters Award, and the Charlie Parker Fellowship for jazz innovation. Bloom also has an asteroid named in her honor by the International Astronomical Union (asteroid 6083janeirabloom).

She adjudicated the prestigious Thelonious Monk International Saxophone Competition, the BMI Jazz Workshop Composition Prize, and served on a distinguished panel of faculty composers at the new Jazz Composers Orchestra Institute at the Center for Jazz Studies at Columbia University.  Recipient of the Doris Duke Jazz New Works Award, and fellowships from the NEA, Rockefeller, Pew & Ford Foundations, she has performed, recorded, and/or collaborated with Charlie Haden, Ed Blackwell, Fred Hersch, George Coleman, Kenny Wheeler, Julian Priester, Rufus Reid, Bob Brookmeyer, Mark Dresser, Bobby Previte, Matt Wilson, Jerry Granelli, Marc Copland, Jay Clayton and Cleo Laine.

Her compositions and commissions include the American Composers Orchestra, St. Luke¹s Chamber Ensemble, Pilobolus & Paradigm Dance Companies, NY City Center's Fall for Dance Festival, and the NASA Art Program. She has also produced and recorded for CBS, ENJA, JMT, Arabesque Jazz Recordings and Artistshare.  Bloom has been presented in the most prestigious halls, clubs, and festivals around the world, and a new event in Brooklyn, NY featuring cutting edge woman artists was named in her honor (the 2009 Bloom Festival).

Friday, September 16, 2011
Harlem in the Himalayas
David Binney Quartet and Special Guests
7:00pm
Location: Rubin Museum of Art
(150 West 17th Street)
$18 in advance | $20 at door | 
For tickets: RMA Box Office or call 212-620-5000 ext. 344

David Binney, alto saxophone
Craig Taborn, piano
Elvind Opsvik, bass
Tyshawn Sorey, drums

Back after sold out shows in years past, acclaimed and highly individual saxophonist/composer David Binney is one of the most prolific jazz musicians on the scene today.  David's distinctive saxophone sound and innovative compositions have been heard from basement clubs in New York to jazz festivals in Europe.

In addition to David's extensive work as a leader, he has also been sought after as a sideman, appearing on recordings with Medeski, Martin & Wood and Uri Caine's Mahler Project. He has produced all of his own albums in addition to two Lost Tribe releases. David started his record label, Mythology Records, in 1998.

Saturday, September 17, 2011

Saturday Panel
Carnegie Hall Jazz
12:00– 4:00pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Starting with Benny Goodman’s historic 1938 concert, Carnegie Hall has hosted jazz concerts that gained classic status when they were issued on commercial recordings. Join us for an afternoon of superlative music courtesy of Miles Davis, Ella Fitzgerald, Duke Ellington, Count Basie and others.
Tuesday, September 20, 2011

Jazz for Curious Listeners
How to Listen to Jazz: Freddie Hubbard’s “Red Clay”
7:00– 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Trumpet icon Freddie Hubbard’s Red Clay marks a transitional moment in his career, in which he had been playing a form of straight-ahead jazz that some called “hard bop” on the Blue Note label. Red Clay incorporated electronic instrumentation (played on keyboard by Herbie Hancock, and bass by Ron Carter) and tapped into soul/funk styling. This was also the first recording on Creed Taylor’s CTI label, a forerunner of what came to be called “fusion jazz.”

Come to hear the various streams of style identified and made crystal clear, as this recording is placed within the historical context of Hubbard’s career as well as the stylistic direction of the music.

Wednesday, September 21, 2011

Tune Talk
“Body and Soul”
7:00pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

A key reason why“Body and Soul” is considered a classic is the very famous rendition by Coleman Hawkins in 1939. As a rite of passage, professional tenor saxophonists everywhere learned that solo. But is one famous version of a song enough to make it an enduring classic?

Or, in this case, do superlative versions by the Benny Goodman Trio, and Chu Berry and Roy Eldridge before Hawkins’, plus re-workings by John Coltrane, Dexter Gordon and others add to the aura of legend?

Tenor saxophonist and museum executive director Loren Schoenberg will go deep into the archives tonight, so join the journey!

Tuesday, September 27, 2011

Jazz for Curious Listeners
How to Listen to Jazz: Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie at Massey Hall
7:00– 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

In what turned out to be their last recording together, Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker performed in Canada at Massey Hall on May 15, 1953 in a show marketed as “the greatest jazz concert ever.” The two primary founders of the bebop movement were joined by drummer Max Roach, bassist Charles Mingus, and pianist Bud Powell.

This concert was indeed a great affair in which they performed songs by Gillespie (“Salt Peanuts,” “A Night In Tunisia”), Thelonious Monk (“52nd Street Theme”), Tadd Dameron (“Hot House”), Juan Tizol (“Perdido”), Jerome Kern (“All the Things You Are”), among others. Come feed your ears with the thrilling sounds and your minds with the keen analysis of Loren Schoenberg.

Thursday, September 29, 2011

Harlem Speaks
Jimmy Heath, saxophonist, composer and arranger
6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300
Long recognized as a brilliant instrumentalist, Heath is also a magnificent composer and arranger. He has performed with nearly all the jazz greats of the last 50 years, from Howard McGhee, Dizzy Gillespie, and Miles Davis to Wynton Marsalis. For the past 30 or so years, Heath performed regularly with his brothers, Percy and Albert, as the Heath Brothers, a band that often included contributions from his son Mtume, a noted percussionist, composer, and rhythm-and-blues producer.
During his career, Heath has performed on more than 100 albums. He has written more than 125 compositions, many of which have become jazz standards and have been recorded by artists such as Art Farmer, Cannonball Adderley, Clark Terry, Chet Baker, Miles Davis, James Moody, Milt Jackson, Ahmad Jamal, Ray Charles, Dizzy Gillespie, J.J. Johnson, and Dexter Gordon. Heath has also composed extended works, premiering his first symphonic work "Three Ears" in 1988 at Queens College (CUNY) with Maurice Peress conducting.
Heath retired from the Aaron Copland School of Music at Queens College in 1998, where he served as a Professor of Music for more than 11 years. Still, he maintains an extensive performance schedule and continues to conduct workshops and clinics throughout the United States, Europe, and Canada. He holds honorary degrees from Sojourner-Douglass College and the Juilliard School, and has a chair endowed in his name at Queens College. Currently, he serves on the board of the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz.
In January 2010, his long-awaited life story, I Walked With Giants, was published by Temple University Press.

National Jazz Museum in Harlem Feb. 21 - Feb. 27, 2011

Upcoming events at the National Jazz Museum in Harlem for this week include

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Monday, February 21, 2011

* Please note the Museum will be closed in observance of President's Day.  

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

Jazz for Curious Listeners
Jazz on Film: Miles Davis
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Miles Davis on film playing trumpet with the Gil Evans Orchestra as John Coltrane waits in the wings is one of the iconic moments caught on film in the 20th century. Come view this footage, and other examples of Davis, one of the most influential artists of the 20th century, on film, and share once again in the magic of Miles’s sound and musical spirit.

Wednesday, February 23, 2010

Jazz Is: Now!
Jonathan Batiste
7:00pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Jazz is not a bygone relic of a gloried past, it’s alive and well right now. Jazz does have a storied past, filled with musical giants who walked the earth, yet there are vibrant young musicians such as Jonathan Batiste who are the legends in the making. Come witness the evolution, lend him your ear, and engage him in discussion about the current state of jazz and future prospects for what Dr. Billy Taylor called “America’s classical music.”

Thursday, February 24, 2011

Harlem Speaks
Otis Brown III, drummer
6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)                                 
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300
Tonight the New Jersey native Otis Brown III will bring his joyful style to Harlem Speaks in a discussion about his life and career as a jazz drummer.

Since his birth in Hackensack, NJ, Otis has traveled a path that has led to him being one of the most in demand, and well respected musicians today. Expressing an early interest in music, Otis began his musical studies at age 7; by age 12 he was playing lead alto saxophone in the school bands while playing the drums in the Baptist church.

After moving to Newark, N.J., he continued performing double duty in his school bands playing snare drum in marching band, and alto saxophone in the jazz and concert ensembles, all of which were directed by his father Otis Brown Jr. He decided to pursue his musical education in college at Delaware State University, where he met legendary trumpeter Donald Byrd, an encounter that changed his life. He spent countless hours under the wings of Dr. Byrd, who later suggested that Otis continue his studies in New York, the jazz capital. He was awarded a scholarship to attend the prestigious New School University.

Since his arrival in New York Otis has performed and toured with musicians the caliber of Herbie Hancock, Christian McBride, Eric Lewis, Ron Blake, Roy Hargrove, Frank Lacy, Jeremy Pelt, Don Braden, Marc Ribot, Adam Rodgers, Pete Malinverni, Tim Hagans, Conrad Herwig, John Hicks, Oliver Lake, Aaron Goldberg, Bob Mintzer, George Garzone, and many others.

He currently can be seen touring with the Thelonious Monk Institute’s Jazz in America initiative, in various of Joe Lovano’s ensembles, the Laurent Coq trio, the Franck Amsallem trio and quartet, the Steve Wilson quartet, the Oliver Lake Big Band, the Bob Stewart tuba project and several other musical configurations.

National Jazz Museum in Harlem 2010 May Schedule

We invite you to join us at the National Jazz Museum in Harlem as we venture to the very birthplace of jazz, New Orleans, for a month-long focus on the Crescent City of today.

We take our Jazz for Curious Listeners theme, “Tuning into Tremé,” as an allusion to the critically acclaimed new HBO series, which itself is named after one of the oldest black neighborhoods in the United States. Curated by Larry Blumenfeld of the Wall Street Journal, this journey will encompass the gumbo of cultures and musics that make New Orleans so special while pointing the way to its post-Katrina future. The Saturday Panel on New Orleans will extend and elaborate this critical inquiry.

Our flagship discussion series, Harlem Speaks, begins with Harlem resident and master tenor saxophonist Wayne Escoffery, and ends with the veteran vibraphonist David Samuels, whose eclectic musical tastes will add spice to the conversation. Trumpet man Randy Sandke’s latest book is making waves in as a fresh and at times controversial look at race and economics in jazz history; he’ll share the whys and hows at Jazz for Curious Readers.

As always, we never just give you all talk and no play, so the instrumentalists will have their say on stage, as pianist Steven Schoenberg performs a solo concert for Harlem in the Himalayas and the NJMH All Stars blow their horns for dancers at Jazz at the Dwyer.

Mark your calendars today, tell some friends, don’t delay, so we can swing with you in May!

Monday, May 3, 2010

Jazz for Curious Readers
Randy Sandke
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Trumpeter/author Randy Sandke, author of Where the Light and the Dark Folks Meet: Race and the Mythology, Politics and Business of Jazz (Scarecrow Press, 2010), has performed at festivals, clubs, and concerts around the world and has recorded over twenty albums as a leader as well.

As a composer, Sandke has had pieces performed at Carnegie Hall, the 92nd St. YMCA, and Avery Fischer Hall at Lincoln Center. The Carnegie Hall Jazz Band performed six of his suites.

Tonight’s focus, however, is on Sandke’s literary achievement and insights.

Randy Sandke’s previous book, Harmony for a New Millennium, details a method of exploring non-tonal harmony in the context of both composition and improvisation. He has also written scholarly articles on jazz history for the Oxford Companion to Jazz and the Rutgers University Annual Review of Jazz Studies.

In his recently published work (see above) Sandke conjoins his experience as a working musician with his scholarship to produce a work that debunks many of the hoary myths surrounding the role of race in jazz history. In what promises to be an intriguing (and perhaps controversial) discussion, Sandke will explain his thesis and why he was inspired to write Where the Light and the Dark Folks Meet: Race and the Mythology, Politics and Business of Jazz.

Tuesday, May 4, 2010

Jazz for Curious Listeners
Tuning in to Tremé: Big Chiefs and Second Lines
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Set in New Orleans, David Simon's new HBO series “Treme” picks up three months after the floods that resulted from the levee failures after Hurricane Katrina. Culture, which in New Orleans means a tight braid of music, cuisine, dance, visual art, and street life, is the primary focus of the series, as indeed it was and is the defining element of the city's identity and its recovery. Familiar faces from Simon's actors' troupe show up as fictional cultural fixtures: Wendell Pierce (detective Bunk Moreland on The Wire) plays Antoine Batiste, a trombonist we first encounter subbing with the real-life Rebirth Brass Band. Clarke Peters (detective Lester Freamon on The Wire) plays the Mardi Gras Indian Chief Albert Lambreaux, chanting out some of his best lines while beating a tambourine. The true-life heroes of New Orleans jazz figure prominently too: In addition to Rebirth, the list of musicians making cameo appearances, often in performance, includes trumpeter Kermit Ruffins, saxophonist Donald Harrison, and Troy “Trombone Shorty” Andrews, and drummer Bob French.

These 90-minute conversations, led by writer Larry Blumenfeld, who has written extensively about New Orleans since the flood, will use the HBO series to frame a wide-ranging consideration of jazz culture in New Orleans and its role in recovery. Excerpts from the show will be screened, and special guests-musicians, participants in the series, and scholars-will join in the discussion.

In Sidney Bechet's memoir, Treat It Gentle, the late, great clarinetist's real grandfather is supplanted by Omar, a fictional figure based on a folk tale, all the better to convey stirring truths about the true origins of New Orleans jazz. Real and imagined intermingle pointedly in New Orleans, in all walks of life. What can the fiction of “Treme”-which is named for the “Tremé neighborhood in New Orleans, long a hothouse for jazz culture-tell is about the city's real culture before and since the flood?

In our first session we will see the manner in which “Treme” plugs directly into an indigenous culture that has served as a lifeline for a New Orleans still inching toward recovery. That lifeline is extended principally by traditional jazz and brass-band musicians; the Social Aid & Pleasure Club members that mount Sunday parades; and-perhaps the most mysterious and essential group of all-Mardi Gras Indians, who dress in elaborate feathered and beaded suits four times a year. We'll consider the roots, traditions and depictions of these culture-bearers and their connections to familiar music.

Thursday, May 6, 2010

Harlem Speaks
Wayne Escoffery, Saxophonist
6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Harlem resident Wayne Escoffery is one of the most talented rising stars and in-demand sidemen on tenor saxophone in jazz. Born in London, Escoffery grew up in New Haven, Connecticut, where he sang in a renowned local boy’s choir and began taking sax lessons. At 16 he attended JazzMobile in Harlem, and by his senior year in secondary school had met Jackie McLean at The Artist’s Collective in Hartford.
McLean gave Wayne a full scholarship to attend The Hartt School, where he graduated summa cum laude with a Bachelor's degree in Jazz Performance, and became known as one of McLean's prize pupils. He went on to attend and graduate from The Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz Performance at The New England Conservatory in Boston with a Masters degree.

Since then, he has performed with a plethora of internationally respected musicians and has become known for his beautiful sound, impressive technique and versatility. As well as performing with his quartet, his group Veneration and a collaborative group with vocalist (and wife) Carolyn Leonhart, Wayne Escoffery currently performs locally and tours internationally with Ben Riley's Monk Legacy Septet, The Tom Harrell Quintet, and The Mingus Big Band/Orchestra/Dynasty.

Friday, May 7, 2010

Harlem in the Himalayas

Steven Schoenberg
7:00pm
Location: Rubin Museum of Art
(150 West 17th Street)
$18 in advance | $20 at door |
For tickets: RMA Box Office
or call 212-620-5000 ext. 344

This solo piano performance marks Steven Schoenberg's first New York concert since the release of Steven Schoenberg Live: An Improvisational Journey. He’s a dynamic, award-winning composer/pianist whose talents cross into musical theater, classical compositions, film scoring, children's music, and solo improvisational piano performances. Schoenberg’s creativity as an improviser and composer shall be on full display as he spontaneously riffs on the Himalayan themes of the venue as well as the vibrations he picks up from the audience . . . so be a part of the experience!

Tuesday, May 11, 2010

Jazz for Curious Listeners
Tuning in to Tremé: Hymns, Dirges and Misdemeanors
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

We continue tracking the acclaimed HBO series, noting that New Orleans jazz has always drawn upon and served both the secular and the sacred, and has been an important element of community organization. Yet, in the wake of Katrina, the often-strained relationship between the musicians and the police, the city and its culture, were starkly revealed: A city known for its culture did not so warmly welcome that culture back. Curator Larry Blumenfeld invites you to join the examination of this tension, and its portrayal in the series.

Saturday, May 15, 2010

Saturday Panels
New Orleans
12:00 – 4:00pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Live music plus film and discussion about the Crescent City
New Orleans holds a special place in the history and mythos of the U.S.A. Its mix of southern, French, Spanish and African cultures, and a largely Catholic religious background—in a nation predominately Protestant—was a uniquely rich soil for the birth and early development of jazz. Today’s discussion will feature live music, film, recordings, and a lively discussion of the Crescent City from the 19th to the 21st centuries, when a post-Katrina New Orleans struggles to recover while maintaining its soul, style and dignity.

Tuesday, May 18, 2010

Jazz for Curious Listeners
Tuning in to Tremé: A Rhythm-and-Blues Intervention
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Following the current HBO series, we note that perhaps more so than in any other American city, New Orleans represents the blending of African rhythms and forms with European harmonies and musical sensibility to transform our ideas about music and seed ongoing innovation. Looking at that lineage-from Congo Square to Louis Armstrong, Fats Domino to the Nevilles, Wynton Marsalis to Lil Wayne-and as portrayed in the series, Larry Blumenfeld and our live audience will consider what that mixture means.

Thursday, May 20, 2010

Harlem Speaks
Dave Samuels, Vibraphonist
6:30 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Veteran Dave Samuels is widely recognized for his fresh new sound and creative approach to both the vibraphone and marimba. Although he’s best known for work with his current ensemble, The Caribbean Jazz Project as well as for his long tenure with Spyro Gyra, Samuels has also worked with a broad scope of artists ranging from Gerry Mulligan, Oscar Peterson, Chet Baker, Stan Getz, Carla Bley and Pat Metheny to the Yellowjackets, Bruce Hornsby, and Frank Zappa.

Samuels has been performing and recording with his group The Caribbean Jazz Project for over a decade; their most recent CD, Afro Bop Alliance, garnered a Latin Grammy and was also nominated for a Grammy. Some of his other recording projects include Remembrances, a percussion recording that features a commissioned marimba concerto for chamber orchestra and soloist composed by Jeff Beal, and Double Image—the vibe-marimba duo consisting of Dave Samuels & David Friedman—which is celebrating thirty years of performances. Double Image performs music which spans many styles - from jazz standards and original compositions to through-composed pieces and spontaneous improvisations, demonstrating Samuels deep versatility and spirit of collaboration.

In addition to his playing, Samuels is a respected educator and author and some of his new works can be found at MalletWorks.com and JazzBooks.com. Samuels has been voted “Best Vibes Player” in both Jazziz and Modern Drummer magazines, and was recently featured on the online jazz television show, Jazz it Up!

Friday, May 21, 2010

Jazz at the Dwyer
Take The A Train: A Big Band Swing Dance
7:00 – 11:00pm
Location: The Dwyer Cultural Center
(258 St. Nicholas Avenue at W. 123rd Street)
$20 | More information: info@DwyerCC.org
, presented with Community Works and The Dywer Cultural Center.

Featuring the NJMH All Star Big Band directed by Loren Schoenberg

Last month, Jazz at the Dwyer featured a romping Caribbean band; this month we’ll swing you into good health with the National Jazz Museum in Harlem All Star Big Band! The famed Big Band Swing era was full of dance bands that stomped and grooved with jitterbugging teens and adults following their every move. Tonight’s show is much more than nostalgia, it’s reclamation of an essential part of the dynamic that made jazz popular. Bring your dancing shoes!

Tuesday, May 25, 2010

Jazz for Curious Listeners
Tuning in to Tremé: Deeper Than the Water
7:00 – 8:30pm
Location: NJMH Visitors Center
(104 E. 126th Street, Suite 2C)
FREE | For more information: 212-348-8300

Weeks into the current HBO series that observes a city built on culture must be rebuilt with culture. That's precisely what is happening in New Orleans. How is this happening? Who are the artists and activists and organizations behind this cultural rebirth? And what can we learn from this experience about the role of culture in our lives and the needs of every American city?

Larry Blumenfeld, curator of this four-part JCL series on New Orleans, writes about music and culture for The Wall Street Journal, Village Voice and many other publications, and is editor-at-large of Jazziz magazine. He is a former Katrina Media Fellow with the Open Society Institute, researching cultural recovery in New Orleans.