john

Band Together for Ally | A Benefit for Ally Strong

Musicians from the elite Long Island/NYC/national jam band and rock and roll community are coming together for a one night effort to challenge small cell cancer and raise money for one of its own suffering from this disease.

Band Together for Ally” will take place on Wednesday, April 20, 2011 at The Homestead, 107 South Street in Oyster Bay, Long Island from 6pm till at least midnight.  Allyson Strong, after receiving her master’s degree last year, was stunningly diagnosed with small cell cervical cancer just before Labor Day.  Radiation and chemo treatments at Sloan Kettering in New York City have not yielded desired results. The community is rallying to assist with the financial needs of the family to fight this dreaded disease. Small cell cervical cancer is an extraordinarily rare diagnosis. There is much to be learned about this specific type of cancer.

This one night fundraising event will assist Allyson and her family offset an extraordinary financial burden and will feature an unprecedented- one time only lineup featuring Rob Barraco (Dark Star Orchestra/The Dead/Phil Lesh and Friends) an original founding member of Red Flannel Hash along with Ally’s dad John Strong, Jeff Mattson (Dark Star Orchestra), John Strong, Jim Kempster, Lee Finkelstein (Funk Filharmonik/Blues Brothers) Rob Barraco and Patrick “Jake” Cummings will reunite as the original Red Flannel Hash for the first time in over thirty years.

Along with the Red Flannel Hash reunion additional acts scheduled to appear include: The Jim Pin Band with Tom Bowes and members of Funk Filharmonik, Quick Draw, The Mike Nugent Band and The FolkadelicsRed Flannel Hash will appear in its original entirety with Ally’s dad John playing bass in both the former 1970’s version of the band as well as with the current configuration acoustic for two separate sets.

Premium donations for raffles have been generously donated and include:  One Brian Moore Custom iGuitar with USB connectivity valued at $1,600, pendants from Tiffany & Co., a pair of 2011 season tickets to Bethel Woods, two separate pairs of camping passes with VIP tent access for Gathering of the Vibes Music, Camping and Arts Festival, July 24-28 at Seaside Park in Bridgeport, CT featuring Bob Weir/Phil Lesh as Furthur, Elvis Costello and the Imposters, Jane’s Addiction, Bill Kreutzmann, Mickey Hart, Steve Kimock, Keller Williams as the Rhythm Devils along with an additional thirty five bands.  More Vibes info can be found at www.govibes.com.

Financial / goods and services donations continue to be gratefully accepted for this fundraising effort.  Media promotion and donations are being provided by WCBS-FM, 94 X Radio, WKJY, B-103, 103.9 WRCN, My Country 96.1 Radio.  Event hosts will include Tom Bowes from Funk Filharmonik, Jonathan Lobdell formally of WLIR-FM and Cande Roth of My Country 96.1 FM.  For those not attending but would like to participate, donations are being accepted in any amount, in the form of a check made out to BARRI GLICK and sent to DAP Agency, PO Box 3587, New Hyde Park, NY 11040.

For more information please go to: www.bandtogetherforally.com.

JETHRO TULL Celebrates AQUALUNG's 40th Anniversary w/ North American Tour

In celebration of the park bench, dribbly-nosed voyeur's 40th Anniversary, Ian Anderson returns to the USA with his band Jethro Tull, starting June 8 in Denver, CO and ending on the 27 in Chicago, IL.

The group features longtime members Ian Anderson (flute, vocals, acoustic guitar) and Martin Barre (guitars), Doane Perry (drums), as well as David Goodier (bass) and pianist John O'Hara.  The latter two joined in 2006 after working with Ian on some of his solo projects.

The group will be performing the Aqualung album in its entirety plus a range of their other favorites from the lat 42 years.  Critics dubbed AQUALUNG “a concept album,” particularly for Ian's critical, skeptical views of organized religion, mostly on side B ("My God," "Hymn 43"). Anderson has disputed - almost resented - the assessment seeing the record as "just a bunch of songs." This led the band to give the critics a full-blown concept album with the following studio release THICK AS A BRICK which topped the Billboard charts in 1972.

On AQUALUNG, the group explores the struggles of the less fortunate in our society (e.g., "Aqualung," "Cross-Eyed Mary," "Up to Me"). Teenage angst and formal education difficulties (e.g., "Wind Up") are explored, and Ian returns to his parental themes with "Cheap Day Return," a tune encompassing Anderson's feelings while traveling North on the train to visit his sick father. "Locomotive Breath" touches on the issues of globalization, population expansion and runaway economics. Sound familiar?

Formed in 1968, Jethro Tull released its first album THIS WAS late in that year and followed up in 1969 with STAND UP.  In the 1970s, the group was one of the most successful live performing acts on the world stage, rivaling Zeppelin, Elton John and even the Rolling Stones. Surprising, really, for a group whose more sophisticated and evolved stylistic extravagance was far from the Pop and Rock norm of that era.

With now some 30-odd albums to their credit and sales totaling more than 50 million, the apparently un-commercial Tull continues to perform over a 100 concerts per year with its rich variety and depth of expression, wherever fans, young and old, want to hear Rock, Folk, Jazz and Classical-inspired music. Music for boys in long trousers and girls with brains.

In 2011, Tull will tour in Australia, Ireland, and Germany.  And Ian will perform solo shows in Germany, Spain, Cyprus, Turkey, Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Venezuela, Panama, Mexico, Czech Republic, the UK, Sweden, Denmark and Finland finishing with his customary charity Christmas concerts at three UK cathedrals.

In 2006, Ian was awarded a Doctorate in Literature from Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, the Ivor Novello Award for International Achievement in Music and, in the New Years Honours List 2008, an MBE for services to music. In 2012, he expects to be awarded the Smithsonian Medal of Honor for smelling OK for someone his age and having ears still in proportion to the rest of his head. His bladder remains elastic and his prostate the size of a pinhead.

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Jethro Tull Tour Dates:

June 8: Red Rock Amphitheater, Morrison, CO
June 10: Comerica Theatre, Phoenix, AZ
June 11: The Greek Theatre, Los Angeles, CA
June 12: TBA, Valley Center, CA
June 13: The Grove, Anaheim, CA
June 14: TBA, Saratoga, CA
June 16: Cuthbert Amphitheater, Eugene, OR
June 17: McMenamins Edgefield Concerts On The Lawn, Troutdale, OR
June 18: TBA, Woodinville, WA
June 19: Centre for the Performing Arts, Vancouver, BC
June 21: Northern Alberta Jubilee Auditorium, Edmonton, AB
June 22: Southern Alberta Jubilee Auditorium, Calgary, AB
June 23: Casino Regina, Regina, SK
June 25: Orpheum Theatre, Minneapolis, MN
June 26: Chicago Theatre, Chicago, IL
June 27: Rosemont Theatre, Rosemont, IL

Spring into Sound at Kimock's NYC Residency

Fresh off a sold-out run in California, Steve Kimock kicks off his NYC residency at Sullivan Hall this Wednesday, March 23rd. The weekly Wednesday performance runs through April 6th and features an array of special guest performers such as New Orleans legend Henry Butler, Marco Benevento, Adam Deitch, John Molo, Pete Sears, John Morgan Kimock, with other special and surprise guests. Regarded as a true "musician's musician," Kimock has been coined, "an unknown legend" in a recent CNN piece, and a master of his craft, it's no wonder that Jerry Garcia dubbed him one of his favorite unknown guitar players.

Kimock has gone out of his way to maintain an authentic relationship with his instrument and his sound. Many focus on music specifically, not dealing with sound as the main component. For Kimock, the sound is the reason that he plays and the music is the vessel. With excitingly stunning guitar explorations coupled with melodic mastery and remarkable improvisation, Kimock's distinctive ability to elevate sonically, creates indescribable moments of transcendence for his loyal audiences.

Blending genres from rock, jazz, blues, to middle-eastern and almost everything in between, Kimock has played with some "main" bands over the years, most notably Zero, KVHW, the Other Ones, and was part of the legendary Phil & Friends lineup in '99, a few incarnations of The Steve Kimock Band and most recently the electronica outfit PRAANG. With his keen ability to step onto any stage at any time, and constantly raise the bar with all sorts of bands through a wide-range of genres, Kimock's guitar playing is the stuff of legends.

The Sullivan Hall residency will kick off promptly at 9 PM for three consecutive Wednesday night performances beginning on March 23rd and will run through April 6th -- and in typical Kimock fashion, each night will have its own flavor, sure to bring some unexpected surprises.

Tickets $20 and available at www.kimock.com and http://www.sullivanhallnyc.com.

The 2011 Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame Induction Ceremony To Air Exclusively On Fuse

Tune-in to Fuse, Sunday, March 20 at 9pm ET

Inductees include Alice Cooper, Neil Diamond, Dr. John, Darlene Love, Tom Waits, Jac Holzman, Art Rupe and Leon Russell

WHAT: The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony will take place at The Waldorf-Astoria on March 14 and will be televised on Fuse on Sunday, March 20 at 9pm ET.

Viewers can also tune-in to Fuse on Friday, March 11 starting at 10pm ET to catch two new documentaries that will profile this year’s honoree Alice Cooper and inductor Rob Zombie. Through interviews with music executives, producers, friends, bandmates and other artists, “Mad Genius: Alice Cooper” and “Mad Genius: Rob Zombie” provide fans with insight into the lives and the groundbreaking music of each artist.

For more information on programming surrounding the show, photo galleries and more, go to www.fuse.tv/rockhall.

WHO: The 2011 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame honorees and presenters are:

Alice Cooper will be inducted by Rob Zombie (White Zombie)
Neil Diamond will be inducted by Paul Simon
Dr. John will be inducted by John Legend
Darlene Love will be inducted by Bette Midler
Tom Waits will be inducted by Neil Young
Jac Holzman will be inducted by John Densmore (The Doors)
Art Rupe will be inducted by Lloyd Price
Leon Russell will be inducted by Elton John

WHEN: Sunday, March 20th at 9pm ET

WHERE: Fuse
DirecTV 339
Cable subscribers, check local listing at 
fuse.tv

About Fuse
Fuse, the national television network dedicated exclusively to music, brings viewers closer to their favorite artists and bands by featuring original series and specials, exclusive interviews, live concerts and video blocks – all rooted in the music experience. Celebrating the hit makers of today, familiar favorites and edgy newcomers, Fuse accommodates the wide ranging tastes and attitudes of its 18-34 year-old audience with compelling music programming on-air, on-line, on-demand, in HD and via mobile technologies. Fuse is a part of MSG Media, which includes television networks MSG, MSG Plus, MSG HD and MSG Plus HD, as well as MSG Interactive, which oversees all company wireless and online initiatives. MSG Media is a division of Madison Square Garden, Inc. (NASDAQ:MSG), along with MSG Sports and MSG Entertainment. MSG Sports includes the New York Knicks (NBA); the New York Rangers (NHL); the New York Liberty (WNBA); the Connecticut Whale (American Hockey League); and MSG Entertainment includes concerts and events at Radio City Music Hall, Madison Square Garden, the Theater at Madison Square Garden, the Wang Theatre in Boston, the Beacon Theatre, as well as the legendary Chicago Theatre, and which manages wholly-owned live entertainment properties including the Radio City Rockettes and the Radio City Christmas Spectacular. Additional information about Fuse can be found at www.fuse.tv.

Chicago vocalist Alison Ruble is featured this week on 12th STREET JUMP

12th STREET JUMP, public radio’s weekly jazz, blues and comedy jam, continues with guest appearances by Chicago vocalist Alison Ruble and guitarist John McLean this Saturday night, March 12 at midnight Central Time (1am Eastern, 11pm Mountain, 10PM Pacific). The popular radio show, recorded live on Kansas City's famed 12th Street Strip,  is syndicated on the Public Radio Exchange and streamed live.

Alison Ruble is a Chicagoland favorite with several hot CDs to her credit, including the most recent. Musical director John McLean joins Ruble direct from sessions and tours with Grammy winning vocalist Kurt Elling.

Award-winning tenor saxman Bobby Watson appears on the April 9 tribute to pianist Herbie Hancock. Trumpet player Stan Kessler and reedmen Kerry Strayer and Kim Park are also featured in upcoming weeks on the show.

Hosted by Pete Weber and Pearl MacDonald, 12th STREET JUMP features vocalists David Basse and Nedra Dixon, musical director Joe Cartwright on piano, Tyrone Clark on bass and Mike Warren on drums in a fast-paced hour of jazz, blues and topical sketch comedy. "It's sort of like a jazz and blues 'Prairie Home Companion' or SNL," explained Exec Producer Mark Edelman.

The 12th STREET JUMP line up of featured artists and special guests includes the following (all dates are Saturdays):

CELEBRATING THE BIRTHDAY OF         WITH SPECIAL GUEST 

March 12               Nat King Cole                                    Alison Ruble & John McLean

March 19               King Pleasure                                    Kim Park

March 26               Thad Jones                                       Stan Kessler

April 2                   Gerry Mulligan                                    Kerry Strayer

April 9                   Herbie Hancock                                  Ken Lovern

April 16                 Lionel Hampton                                  Peter Schlamb

April 23                 Otis Rush & Albert King                      Bill Dye

April 30                 Groove Holmes                                   Everette DeVan

Broadcast live from the 12th Street Jazz Walk of Fame, Kansas City’s jazz, blues and honky-tonk heart, 12th STREET JUMP continues that tradition on the same street where Count Basie tickled the ivories at the Reno Club and Big Joe Turner shouted the blues.”

Jake Hertzog Trio Live At Miles Cafe This Friday!

Jake Hertzog, one of the most original and exciting young guitarists on the of the modern jazz guitar and fusion. Drawing from extensive experience in the jazz world and indie rock scene, Hertzog has developed a truly original sound.  At only 24 years old, Jake has already released two critically acclaimed fusion albums, Chromatosphere (2009, Thats Out) and Patterns (2010, Buckyball).  A distinguished graduate of the Berklee College of Music, Jake performed with jazz greats Joe Lovano, Terri Lyne Carrington, Michael Wolff, Mike Clark, and Greg Osby. In 2006 He was also the youngest ever winner of the Montreux Jazz Festival Jazz Guitar Competition and was invited to open for John Scofield at the 2007 Montreux Jazz Festival.

As a result of touring the US as bandleader for Nickelodeon pop-stars Nat and Alex Wolff, performing in arenas, and playing with dozens of indie rock bands in the New York scene most notably "Wakey Wakey",  Jake developed a ferocious performance style, uncommon in the jazz world.  In addition to an aggressive performance schedule, Jake is an active jazz educator and has done workshops all over the world.  He currently writes a jazz column for Guitar Player Magazine (US) entitled “Hey Jazz Guy”, and has been coined "The jazz ambassador to the non-jazz world".  2011 will be an exciting year for Jake Hertzog, as a new album is set to be released late spring, as well as Jake's singer-songwriter project "The Young Presidents" will also be releasing a new album.

The Jake Hertzog Trio, featuring jazz legends Harvie S and Victor Jones is one of the most dramatic and exciting 'force of nature' acts in the instrumental world.  The unforgettable live experience is somewhere between, Jimi Hendrix and John Mayer, Pat Metheny and U2, Keith Richards and John Scofield.  The only way to find out is to experience it yourself.

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The band:

-Harvie S-  (bass)

The legendary Harvie S has performed and recorded with masters in music including Stan Getz, Chet Baker, Dexter Gordon, Jim Hall, Michael Brecker, Gil Evans, Mike Stern, Pat Metheny, Art Farmer, Toots Thielemans, Joe Lovano, John Scofield, Chick Corea, Erik Friedlander, Danilo Perez, Paquito D'Rivera, Pat Martino among many others and hailed by Jazz Improv as “one of the preeminent bass voices in jazz today.”

-Victor Jones-  (drums)

Victor Jones got his start in Stan Getz’s band and has since performed and recorded with Woody Shaw, Freddie Hubbard, Stanley Clarke, Michel Pettruciani, Dizzy Gillespie, Chaka Khan among others. One of the pioneers of “acid jazz”, Jones continues to lead his own group “Culturversey”, the current incarnation of which includes Jake Hertzog on guitar.

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Jake Hertzog Trio with Harvie S (bass) and Victor Jones (drums)

Friday  March 4th,

7:30pm - 9:30pm

The Miles Café Jazz Club

212 E. 52nd St. 3Fl.

(b/t 2nd & 3rd Ave.) New York, NY 10022

Jethro Tull Returns to Red Rocks!

Jethro Tull and Kansas will be performing at Red Rocks Amphitheatre, 18300 West Alameda Parkways, in Morrison, CO on June 8.  The show starts at 7:30 PM.  Tickets are $49.50 and $84.50, plus applicable service fees.  The venue phone is 800-745-3000, and the website.

In celebration of the park bench, dribbly-nosed voyeur's 40th Anniversary, Ian Anderson returns to the USA with his band Jethro Tull, starting June 8 in Denver, CO and ending on the 26 in Chicago, IL.

The group features longtime members Ian Anderson (flute, vocals, acoustic guitar) and Martin Barre (guitars), Doane Perry (drums), as well as David Goodier (bass) and pianist John O'Hara.  The latter two joined in 2006 after working with Ian on some of his solo projects.

The group will be performing the Aqualung album in its entirety plus a range of their other favorites from the lat 42 years.  Critics dubbed AQUALUNG “a concept album,” particularly for Ian's critical, skeptical views of organized religion, mostly on side B ("My God," "Hymn 43"). Anderson has disputed - almost resented - the assessment seeing the record as "just a bunch of songs." This led the band to give the critics a full-blown concept album with the following studio release THICK AS A BRICK which topped the Billboard charts in 1972.

On AQUALUNG, the group explores the struggles of the less fortunate in our society (e.g., "Aqualung," "Cross-Eyed Mary," "Up to Me"). Teenage angst and formal education difficulties (e.g., "Wind Up") are explored, and Ian returns to his parental themes with "Cheap Day Return," a tune encompassing Anderson's feelings while traveling North on the train to visit his sick father. "Locomotive Breath" touches on the issues of globalization, population expansion and runaway economics. Sound familiar?

Formed in 1968, Jethro Tull released its first album THIS WAS late in that year and followed up in 1969 with STAND UP.  In the 1970s, the group was one of the most successful live performing acts on the world stage, rivaling Zeppelin, Elton John and even the Rolling Stones. Surprising, really, for a group whose more sophisticated and evolved stylistic extravagance was far from the Pop and Rock norm of that era.

With now some 30-odd albums to their credit and sales totaling more than 50 million, the apparently un-commercial Tull continues to perform over a 100 concerts per year with its rich variety and depth of expression, wherever fans, young and old, want to hear Rock, Folk, Jazz and Classical-inspired music. Music for boys in long trousers and girls with brains.

In 2011, Tull will tour in Australia, Ireland, and Germany.  And Ian will perform solo shows in Germany, Spain, Cyprus, Turkey, Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Venezuela, Panama, Mexico, Czech Republic, the UK, Sweden, Denmark and Finland finishing with his customary charity Christmas concerts at three UK cathedrals.

In 2006, Ian was awarded a Doctorate in Literature from Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, the Ivor Novello Award for International Achievement in Music and, in the New Years Honours List 2008, an MBE for services to music. In 2012, he expects to be awarded the Smithsonian Medal of Honor for smelling OK for someone his age and having ears still in proportion to the rest of his head. His bladder remains elastic and his prostate the size of a pinhead.

Read Grateful Web's interview with Ian Anderson.

John Prine at the Boulder Theater - 03.25.11

97.3 KBCO & the Daily Camera are proud to present John Prine at the Boulder Theater on Friday, March 25th, 2011.

The first time he got onstage to perform – at a Chicago open mic night – there was absolute silence. Here comes a guy nobody had ever seen, a mailman from nearby Maywood, and the very first songs he ever sings are miracles, songs like “Hello In There” and “Angel from Montgomery.” But this stunned silence spelled disaster to Prine. “They just sat there,” he said. “They didn’t even applaud, they just looked at me. I thought, `Uh oh. This is pretty bad.’ I started shuffling my feet and looking around. And then they started applauding and it was a really great feeling. It was like I found out all of a sudden that I could communicate deep feelings and emotions. And to find that out all at once was amazing.”

That one night changed his life. The club-owner offered him a gig, and from that moment on he quickly became one of Chicago’s most beloved local heroes, a guy who would honor the Windy City with as much love and grace as Studs Terkel and Carl Sandburg. Prine soon befriended another local hero, Steve Goodman, and with Goodman he met the world. Kris Kristofferson heard his songs, helped him land a record deal, and soon everyone knew what Chicago already did, that Prine was the real deal. From that first album on, he came known as a genuine “songwriter’s songwriter,” one of the rare ones who writes the songs other songwriters would sell their souls for.  Evidence of this is the long list of songwriters who have recorded his songs, including Johnny Cash, Bonnie Raitt, the Everly Brothers, John Denver, Kris Kristofferson, Carly Simon, Ben Harper, Joan Baez, and many others. Even Bob Dylan was stunned. “His stuff is pure Proustian existentialism,” said Bob Dylan.  . “He’s so good,” said Kristofferson, “we’re gonna have to break his fingers.”

Dylan and the rest were simply recognizing that which we have all come to know, that Prine’s songs are so hauntingly evocative of the laughter and tears inherent in the human condition, so purely precise and finely etched, that lines from them linger in our hearts and minds like dreams, separate from the songs. There’s the rodeo poster from “Angel from Montgomery,” the hole in daddy’s arm and the broken radio (from “Sam Stone”), the old trees that just grow stronger (from “Hello In There.”) The kinds of lines you carry around in your pocket, knowing they’re in there when you need them. With a staggering penchant for detail, a proclivity to be both hilarious and deeply serious (and often in the same song), and a visceral embrace  of roots music, he’s  made the kinds of songs nobody ever dreamed of before, or since.

Born on October 10th, 1946 in Maywood, he grew up spinning Roy Acuff and Hank Williams 78s in his dad’s collection, as well as tuning into WJJD to hear Webb Pierce, Lefty Frizell and others “back to back, all night long.” And then a new kind of music arrived: “I was coming of age just as rock and roll was invented,” he said, and along with his country heroes he added Elvis, Little Richard, Fats Domino, and the one he loved the most, Chuck Berry: “Because he told a story in less than three minutes.”

At 14 he started playing guitar and never stopped, starting with old folk tunes taught to him by his brother Dave. After high school he enlisted in the army, and was happy to be stationed in Germany, far from Viet Nam. He spent most of his time in the barracks playing guitar and singing Lefty Frizzell and Hank Williams songs with a friend.After the army, he became a mailman, which he loved because he could write songs while walking his familiar route. “It was like a library with no books,” he said.

He haunted the fringes of Chicago open mic nights, mostly at the old Fifth Peg on Armitage in Old Town. Once he summoned up the courage to perform, although terrified, he knew he was home. The rest is singer-songwriter history. It was 1971, the dream of the Sixties was over and Goodman and Prine emerged with a new kind of song, eschewing abstractions to write story songs about real people:  “Midwestern mindtrips to the nth degree,” as Dylan put it. Songs with the concrete details and imagery of a novel, but compounded, like Prine’s hero Chuck Berry’s songs, into mini-masterpieces.

After landing his first gig, he went home and wrote more masterpieces that made up his first self-titled debut, released in 1971. It was received with near-unanimous raves: “… absolutely one of the greatest albums ever made,” wrote a hometown paper, “by one of the most creative and evocative songwriters of our time.” There was the recognition then, which has been confirmed by the passage of time, that even among the best, he stood out. “Good songwriters are on the rise,” wrote Rolling Stone, “but John is differently good.”

Fans hungry for meaningful new music discovered him, unconcerned if he was the “new Dylan” or not, as he was often labeled, but drawn to the complex simplicity of his songs, the heady amalgam of sorrow and whimsy. Always seeking to strike a balance in his work, Prine said he wrote funny songs so as to get back to the tragic ones.

He made eight albums on two major labels, including Sweet Revenge, Common Sense, and Bruised Orange. In 1980 he moved to Nashville, and with longtime manager Al Bunetta, formed his own label, Oh Boy Records in 1981. They’ve since released a chain of great records, including 1991’s Grammy-winning The Missing Years, which featured cameos by Bruce Springsteen and Tom Petty. In 2000 he recaptured his own legacy by recording Souvenirs, new recordings of many of his classic songs.

In 1998 he was diagnosed with a rare form of cancer centered in his neck. The removal of a tumor and subsequent radiation seems to have eradicated it completely. Although his singing voice was lowered significantly, he faced his illness with the same blend of wistful humor he instills in his songs. In a post-surgery letter to his fans, he wrote, “Hopefully my neck is looking forward to its job of holding my head up above my shoulders.”

Now he’s back with a brand new live album, John Prine: In Person & On Stage, which contains both solo and duet renditions of some of early songs such as “Angel From Montgomery” (here in a breathtaking duet with Emmylou Harris) as well as later classics such as “Unwed Fathers” (with Iris DeMent) and one of the most poignant songs ever from a husband to a wife, “She Is My Everything.”

“If he’s this good this young,” wrote Rolling Stone in 1971, “time should be on his side.” Truer words have rarely been written. Some four decades since his remarkable debut, Prine has stayed at the top of his game, both as a performer and songwriter. Recently honored at the Library of Congress, he has been elevated from the annals of songwriters into the realm of bonafide American treasures.  Poet Laureate Ted Kooser introduced him at the Library of Congress by likening him to Raymond Carver for making “monuments of ordinary lives.” But the greatest testaments to his lasting legacy are the songs themselves. Unlike so many which belong only to the time in which they emerged, his, like the old trees in “Hello In There,” seem to just grow stronger with the passing years.

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Tickets are on sale at Boulder Theater Box Office. Call (303) 786-7030 for tickets by phone.

Tickets are also available through our website @ www.bouldertheater.com.

Tickets are On Sale Saturday, February 5th!

$40 GA / $48.50 Res / $65 Gold Circle

John Hartford Stringband Nominated for Grammy Best Traditional Folk Album

GRAMMY voting is wrapping up for the dozens of nominees in scores of categories, including for John Hartford Stringband’s tribute album to the late, great singer-songwriter, MEMORIES OF JOHN (Red Clay/Compass Records), in Category 68: Best Traditional Folk Album, as February 13 approaches and the 53rd annual GRAMMY Awards presentation in Los Angeles.

In what would be 10 years after his passing in 2001, the same group of musicians who appeared on John Hartford’s last five Rounder Records projects and were his final touring band — Chris Sharp on guitar, Bob Carlin on banjo, Matt Combs on fiddle, Mike Compton on mandolin and Mark Schatz on bass — are eager to win the GRAMMY as further tribute to the banjo wizard, guitar picker, vocalist, musical innovator and multiple GRAMMY Award-winning recording artist who penned the megahit “Gentle on My Mind.” Stringband members were joined on MEMORIES OF JOHN by special guests Tim O’Brien, Bela Fleck, Alison Brown, Alan O’Bryant, George Buckner and Eileen Carson Schatz. The album also features Hartford himself on several previously unreleased tracks as well as voiced instructions to the band from previous rehearsal tapes.

Andy Friedman prepares 'Laserbeams And Dreams' CD

On April 5, 2011, artist and songwriter Andy Friedman will release his third studio album, Laserbeams and Dreams (City Salvage Records).  Produced by noted guitarist and producer David Goodrich (Chris Smither, Peter Mulvey), the album was recorded in Friedman’s Brooklyn neighborhood and cut in 24 hours with one overdub and mixed in the studio.  Complementing Friedman’s “art-damaged, ragged-but-right” (L.A. Weekly) approach and Goodrich’s restrained, atmospheric lead guitar and piano is rising-star upright bassist and composer Stephan Crump (Grammy®-nominated Vijay Iyer Trio, Jim Campilongo), whose latest album of “ingenious originals” (The New Yorker), Reclamation (recorded with his Rosetta Trio), NPR spotlighted among its top five jazz albums of 2010. The interplay of Friedman’s “engagingly singular” (Philadelphia Inquirer) songwriting and “slow, lugubrious, dipped in country heartache” (Hartford Advocate) strum with Crump’s “full, appealingly wooden sound” (The New York Times) calls to mind classic collaborations by Van Morrison with bassist Richard Davis on 1968’s Astral Weeks, or John Hartford and Dave Holland on 1972’s Morning Bugle Call — albums also recorded live in the studio without much pre-conceived musical planning.  “We captured the mood created,” says Friedman.  “It wasn’t our place to second-guess the results.”

Andy Friedman first hit the road as a self-described “Slideshow Poet” in 2002, leaving his day job as an office assistant in the Editorial Department at The New Yorker to accompany projections of his paintings, drawings, and Polaroids with readings of his poetry in dive bars and rock clubs around the nation.  The hybrid performance was applauded by journalists as “the coolest show to come around in a long time” (Good Times [Santa Cruz]), and introduced Friedman as “The King of Art Country” (City Pages [Minneapolis]).  The transition from traveling poet to rambling musician occurred when the “erudite redneck” (Boston Globe) picked up the guitar and sang for the first time in his life in 2005, shortly before recording his debut album, Taken Man (City Salvage Records), the title track of which landed at #30 on a New York Post “Best Songs” list that included over 200 hits by artists such as Bruce Springsteen, Neil Young, Andrew Bird, Amy Winehouse, and The National.

Friedman’s reputation as a “dusty, paint-splattered Americana sage” (Rochester News & Democrat) germinated with the release of the CD Weary Things (City Salvage Records) in 2009, garnering enthusiastic praise, a performance on NPR’s coveted Mountain Stage, a feature interview on XM’s Bob Edwards Show, and a growing audience.  The online cultural journal Slant hailed Friedman as “an arrival of one of the genre’s smartest and deepest talents.” His “hard-tack country originals” were described in The New Yorker as “the mark of a true artist,” while NoDepression.com called his songs “unforgettable.” Old Crow Medicine Show's Ketch Secor proffered the song “Weary Things” as a “certified, genuine American tune,” and Indie-icon Sufjan Stevens proclaimed, “I think the world of Andy Friedman. I’ve always wanted to be Andy Friedman.” Largely overlooked, Weary Things was highlighted alongside titles by Tom Waits and Chuck Prophet by the Associated Press among “The Best Overlooked Albums of 2009.” “Friedman can write a lyric, and he can deliver it,” declared Stephen Wine. “He is not to be overlooked, that’s for sure.”

Laserbeams and Dreams tackles themes of religion, aging, disillusionment, and family, but images of death prevail in all forms. The gospel dirge “Time for Church” is the album’s opener, and finds Friedman renouncing religion in favor of drink, music, and art.  “It’s time for church/It’s five o’clock,” he sings. “Pour a drink/let the record play.” Friedman’s vocals boom with an echo recalling the classic Nashville Sound recorded by Chet Atkins at RCA in the late ’50s and ’60s. The lilting “Motel on the Lake” presents death as the crumbling façade of a once vibrant Catskill Mountain summer resort community more famously referred to as the Borscht Belt, which the singer now reports “whips the children.” Goodrich brings haunting upright piano to “May I Rest When Death Approaches,” a song based on a series of poems written by Friedman’s father-in-law days before his passing.  “Roll On, John Herald” is at once a tribute to the late John Herald — a founding member of the seminal late-’50s bluegrass trio the Greenbriar Boys, who died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound in the summer of 2005 — and a humbling, dark portrayal of life as an obscure legend on the road. “When Vin played him on Idiot’s Delight/I knew John Herald had died,” growls Friedman, who befriended the singer when Herald invited the then “slideshow poet” to open a string of dates in 2003.  In “Quiet Blues,” recorded minutes after the ferocious “Roll On, John Herald,” Friedman laments with newfound vocal sensitivity the death of peace and quiet in the digital age.  “Hey, Command Z/bring the quiet blues back to me,” he warbles. “Recording those two songs without a break was like a biathlon,” says Friedman. Singer-songwriter Jen Chapin, who is married to Crump, lent the guitar played by her father — the late Harry Chapin — to Friedman for the recording of Laserbeams and Dreams.

It’s not all death and despair for Friedman, who approaches these themes with the acerbic wit and dark humor of a New Yorker gag cartoon — a pastime with which the singer has found past success under the pseudonym Larry Hat. With “Going Home (Drifter’s Blessing),” Friedman delivers an anthem for the little-known folksinger trying to make it out on the road, whose faith in himself is tested by long drives, missed family, and dismal turnouts, but can only wish the life on his children and theirs.  In “Down by the Willow,” the album’s closer, Friedman is seduced by the serenity of life in the country but is “shackled and chained” to the gritty confines of the city, revisiting the famous car wash scene from the 1967 Paul Newman classic Cool Hand Luke.

Friedman will perform the record in its entirety, accompanied by David Goodrich and Stephan Crump, on select dates during the Laserbeams and Dreams tour.