styles

The Dang-It Bobbys Release New Album 'Big Trouble'

The Dang-it Bobbys, whose sound The New York Times described as “lovely riffs on bluegrass, country and folk music,” will release on September 20 its sophomore album, BIG TROUBLE, the follow-up to its 2009 debut, SOMETHING IN THE AIR. While many of the band’s riffs are lovely, there is much more: ingenious combinations of musical styles as well as smart, funny lyrics and a special energy that is downright contagious.

The Dang-It Bobbys will play the CD Release Show at 10 p.m. Saturday, September 24, at Rockwood Music Hall, 196 Allen St. in New York City. Complimentary Cover; information: 212.477.4155.

The Dang-it Bobbys, led by multi-instrumentalist Kris Bauman, explore what the word “Americana” truly means on the upcoming release, which features musicians from the New York City bluegrass, jazz, rock and country music scene, The band is a real melting pot of American music, showcasing the talents of blues/funk guitarist Luca Benedetti (ulu), jazz/classical violinist Alan Grubner (Henry Threadgill, Howard Levy), jazz bassist Chris Higgins (Pat Metheny), bluegrass mandolinist Dan Marcus (Norah Jones), and the 2001 RockyGrass Dobro champion, Todd Livingston (Earl Scruggs).
The Dang-it Bobbys’ unorthodox background is clearly evident on the autobiographical title track “Big Trouble,” a cautionary tale for would-be travelers to Mexico, juxtaposing a bluegrass style 4/4 and English lyrics with a traditional Mexican 3/4 feel and “gringo-ized” Spanish. On “Hey Guess What,” the cyclical form, heart-wrenching harmonica and mantric snare drum provide the backdrop to a mother’s attempt to come clean to her daughter. “Heading Out,” an unconventional ballad, showcases the band’s range of both intensity and tenderness.
The Dang-it Bobbys garner influence from all facets of American music, from bluegrass and country to jazz and blues. It is this flavorful stew of styles, coupled with the artistry of the adroit musicians featured on BIG TROUBLE, that give The Dang-it Bobbys an unquestionably American sound.
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Upcoming Performances:
September 24, Rockwood Music Hall, New York
October 2, 9, 16, 23, 30, Pete’s Candy Store, Brooklyn

Parlovr Unveil Cover Art & Tracklisting / East Coast Tour To Be Announced Soon

Meet Parlovr (pretend the V is a U when you say it). Over the last few years, these three Montrealers have been bringing their manic melee of indie pop to the musically-curious masses. They’ve already amassed plenty of attention from tasters and tastemakers alike via their blissfully bizarre tracks and seizure-inducing live shows; however, after recently signing onto the Dine Alone Records roster, the band is ready to make some serious noise in the new decade – in more ways than one…
Initially formed in a Mile-End loft during the winter of 2006 by guitarist/vocalist Louis David Jackson and keyboardist/vocalist Alex Cooper, the current incarnation of Parlovr came about in 2007 when drummer Jeremy MacCuish entered the fold – a catalyst to the fusion of the foiling songwriting styles of the original two. Since, the band has taken off on its own sonic tangent, appropriately dubbed “sloppy pop” in the past; stripped down but salacious and spastic.
The music is about as diverse as the city that spawned it – an interweaving of styles that takes on a shape and shimmer of its own. Raw and reverb-soaked, their independently-released, self-titled debut dropped in late 2008, recorded and produced by Martin Horn at Digital Bird Studios.
The songs found therein are rooted in dramatic dynamics not unlike those that exist between Cooper and Jackson’s foiling songwriting styles – quiet and loud; screams and whispers; sing-alongs and spacey instrumentals; warm low-end and crisp, shimmering leads; short pop jabs and extended epics. You get the idea, right? It’s quirky, it’s catchy, and while it’s full of familiar throwbacks to ‘60s pop, ‘80s post-punk, and ‘90s garage, it’s also refreshing.
Since its release, the album has garnered some great ink in pretty much every well-respected left-of-centre publication here in Canada – Hero Hill, Chartattack, and Hour among them. Even some from the south are taking notice, with Spin magazine calling the band one of the “5 to watch” out of Montreal (it’s pretty much the new Seattle) and The New York Times sharing kind words about their live show. It’s obvious the bandwagon is starting to fill up, and everybody on it is dancing.
Parlovr has spent time bringing their melodies on the road, having toured extensively throughout Canada, New York, France and Europe alongside indie pop peers like Arctic Monkeys and Franz Ferdinand.
With all of the pieces in place, Parlovr seems set to bring their melodic mayhem to a widespread populace for the new decade.
It’s 2010, and it’s finally cool to say you listen to Parlovr music.