loved

TG Sheppard and Wayne Mills Collaborate to Remake Sheppard's Hit "I Loved 'Em Everyone"

Wayne Mills and country legend, TG Sheppard head into Ocean Way Studios along with famed producer Denny Diante to remake Sheppard’s 1981 hit “I Loved ‘Em Everyone” which will be featured on Mills highly anticipated new album Long Hard Road under Diesel Records. Other musicians rounding out this all-star cast include Johnny Neel on the keyboard, formerly with the Allman Brothers, Chris Powell on drums, “Cowboy” Eddie Long, Jason "Rowdy" Cope, all with Jamey Johnson’s band, Mickey Raphael on harmonica, from Willie Nelson’s band, Gary Craig on bass and Luke Davis on guitar, both from Mill's band, and seasoned studio musicians Brent Mason and Steve Rutledge on lead and rhythm guitars.

“I came into the studio to record with Wayne because I believe in him. I hope our collaboration on this song is as good to Wayne as it was for me when I began my career,” says Sheppard when asked about remaking his hit “I Loved ‘Em Everyone.”

“Working with a country music legend like TG Sheppard is an incredible honor on both a personal and professional level,” says Mills. “I am humbled and grateful to have him on my record.  I am sure that all of our fans will enjoy the remake of ‘I Loved ‘Em Everyone,’” adds Mills.

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Wayne Mills Band

Wayne Mills will soon release his 7th studio album Long Hard Road where he worked with powerhouse producer Denny Diante under new Nashville record label, Diesel Records. Wayne, a native of Arab, AL, pushes the boundaries of contemporary country with tracks including “I Need the Country, Whiskey Bent and Jail Bound” and the title track “Long Hard Road” which chronicles the lonesome tale of a man making bad decisions and working through the consequences. With more than fifteen years of touring experience, Wayne has proved himself the consummate performer with a huge following in the Southeast while gaining influence in other markets. This singer/songwriter’s traditional country style blended with an edgy rock sound will please new and old country music fans alike with Long Hard Road. His music is the soundtrack to his life: leaving no stone unturned when it comes to lyrics and his life.

Local Natives Release Entirety Of "Gorilla Manor" For Remix

Local Natives have just finished an epic year, touring the world in support of their critically acclaimed debut Gorilla Manor.  But just before they go into hiding to start work on their second record, they're wrapping a few things up first.

The band are adding the last four unreleased stems to their remix site, allowing fans and other artists to remix any song they like. All tracks are then posted for the world to download and enjoy.

Local Natives are planning on releasing their favorites on a special compilation later this month, so any remixes must be submitted by Dec 15th to be eligible.

"We are happy to announce that we just released the stems to the remaining last four songs from the album on our remix site (Airplanes, Warning Sign, Cubism Dream, and Stranger Things).  Also, in light of all the awesome remixes we've received over the past six months, we're going to pick our favorites and package them into a sort of "Best-Of" compilation, so make sure to get any remixes in by December 15th to make the cut.  Here is a download of a groovy take of "Stranger Things" by Wallpaper.  Enjoy, and happy holiday remixing!  Spike that eggnog, hug your loved ones, and feel that spirit."

Click here for more info.

Gary Wilson, Reigning King of Outsider Music, to Release Electric Endicott

In 1977 Gary Wilson famously released a uniquely bizarre and personal album titled You Think You Really Know Me..., full of electro-funk, proto-new wave, noise collage, and avant-garde jazz. Despite the fact that the album's fans included Beck, Questlove from The Roots, Simpsons creator Matt Groening, and Stones Throws' Peanut Butter Wolf, widespread fame and notoriety eluded Gary Wison until the 2002 re-release of his debut album. Soon after media outlets like Pitchfork, The Village Voice, and The New York Times were talking about the lecherous outsider artist, remarkable as much for his idiosyncrasies and DIY aesthetic as his edgy and creative music.

More than the perverted musings of a peeping tom, Gary's music is an honest reflection of ourselves…at least of that part of ourselves that loved our childhood pets more than we loved our parents, that worried if we'd ever make it to second base, or that really knows how often we floss. Equal parts Prince and Pee Wee Herman…Joe Jackson and Charlie Brown, Gary's songs celebrate our inner ickiness, silliness and grooviness, the romance and randiness of born-losers from Endicott or Anywhere. Rather than alienating us with their creepiness, his lyrics and melodies ultimately make us feel more comfortable being who we are....more comfortable being human.

Like ignoring the downfall and ruin of your hometown or clinging to the rotting corpse of your prom date that you've been keeping in your closet, on Electric Endicott Gary makes a choice, as many of us often do, to inhabit and mythologize, a time and place where he was the king or the charming jester, and Karen, Mary, and Linda were his fair princesses.

Have a listen to Electric Endicott's title track {play}images/mp3/electric_endicott.mp3{/play}.