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Grace Jones' Hurricane, first US release in 22 years

Acclaimed singer, songwriter and actress, Grace Jones is preparing to release Hurricane, a new album of original material, in the U.S. on September 6 via [PIAS] America. Produced by Jones and Ivor Guest, Hurricane has received widespread praise in the U.K. and Europe where it was released in 2009. The tracks “Williams’ Blood” and “Corporate Cannibal” have emerged as hits as has the video for “Corporate Cannibal” directed by Nick Hooker. The release will also include a brand new bonus disc dub version of the entire album.

Check out the William’s Blood (Aeroplane remix) radio edit MP3 where it premiered on RCRD LBL today or HERE!

In July 2009, Jones performed in a new show at The Hollywood Bowl in Los Angeles and the Hammerstein Ballroom in New York City. Collaborating with acclaimed Academy Award-winning costume and production designer Eiko Ishioka, Jones debuted songs from the new album for U.S. audiences.

The shows received overwhelming praise from audiences and critics alike.  Daily Variety wrote “...a commanding Grace Jones provided a finely tuned display of humanity” and “...the return of Jones was warm and uplifting”. The LA Times ran the headline “Grace Jones bowls over the Bowl” and the New York Times reported that Jones was “lithe, fierce and solid”. Rolling Stone wrote “So many performers are said to be larger than life, but the show biz cliché has never been truer than it is for Grace Jones…the crowd roared as if they’d seen the second coming”.

Born in Jamaica before relocating to Syracuse, New York with her family, Grace Jones embarked on a successful career as a model in New York City and Paris. In 1977 Jones secured her first record deal resulting in a string of dance-club hits including “I Need A Man” and her acclaimed reinvention of Edith Piaf’s classic “La Vie En Rose”. The three disco albums she recorded, “Portfolio” (1977), “Fame” (1978) and “Muse” (1979), generated considerable success in the market and established her as a major recording artist.

During this period Jones became a fixture on the international club scene and was often seen at New York City’s famed nightclub Studio 54. Jones also became a muse to Andy Warhol who photographed her extensively and created a series of iconic portraits of her.

Towards the end of the 1970’s Jones adapted the emerging New Wave music to create a different style for herself. Working with Island Records producers Chris Blackwell, Alex Sadkin and Compass Point All Stars, she recorded the critically acclaimed albums “Warm Leatherette” (1980) and “Nightclubbing” (1981). These included reimagining’s of songs by Sting (“Demolition Man”), Iggy Pop and David Bowie (“Nightclubbing”), Roxy Music (“Love is the Drug”), Astor Piazzolla (“I’ve Seen That Face Before (Libertango)”) and Tom Petty (“Breakdown”).

Both albums included tracks co-written by Jones herself including “A Rolling Stone”, “Feel Up” and most notably, the post-disco dance track “Pull Up to the Bumper” which spent seven weeks as #2 on the U.S. Billboard Hot Dance Club play chart and became a Top 5 single on the U.S. R&B chart.

Parallel to her musical shift was an equally dramatic visual makeover, created in partnership with artist Jean-Paul Goode, with whom she had a son. Jones adapted a severe, androgynous look with square-cut hair and angular, padded clothes. The cover photographs of “Nightclubbing” and “Warm Leatherette” as well as her subsequent albums exemplified this new identity.

Jones’ next release was the dub reggae-influenced “Living My Life” (1982) which featured the self-penned hit “My Jamaican Guy”. In 1985 she worked with Trevor Horn for the conceptual music collage “Slave to the Rhythm” and in 1986 she collaborated with Nile Rogers for “Inside Story” which produced the Billboard 100 Hit, “I’m Not Perfect (But I’m Perfect For You”), one of several songs she co-wrote with Bruce Wooley. “Bulletproof Heart” (1989) spawned the Number 1 U.S. Hot Dance Club Play hit “Love on Top of Love (Killer Kiss)” produced by C&C Music Factory’s David Cole and Robert Clivilles.

Jones is equally famous for her motion picture roles in such features as “Conan the Destroyer” (1984) co-starring Arnold Schwarzenegger, “A View to a Kill” (1985) co-starring Roger Moore as James Bond, the vampire thriller “Vamp” (in which Keith Haring famously painted her body for her role as an undead exotic dancer) and “Boomerang” (1992) co-starring Eddie Murphy (for which she recorded the song “7 Day Weekend”). Her television work includes appearances on “Pee-Wee’s Playhouse Christmas Special” (1988), “Beastmaster” (1999) and “Shaka Zulu: The Citadel” (2001).

Grace Jones To Release "Hurricane" Album & Dub Version

Acclaimed singer, songwriter and actress, Grace Jones is preparing to release Hurricane, a new album of original material, in the U.S. on September 6 via [PIAS] America. Produced by Jones and Ivor Guest, Hurricane has received widespread praise in the U.K. and Europe where it was released in 2009. The band that plays on the album includes luminaries Brian Eno, Sly & Robbie, and Tricky. The tracks “Williams’ Blood” and “Corporate Cannibal” have emerged as hits overseas as has the video for “Corporate Cannibal” directed by Nick Hooker. The release will also include a brand new bonus disc dub version of the entire album. Download the MP3 of the track “Sunset Sunrisehere.

In July 2009, Jones performed in a new show at The Hollywood Bowl in Los Angeles and the Hammerstein Ballroom in New York City. Collaborating with acclaimed Academy Award-winning costume and production designer Eiko Ishioka, Jones debuted songs from the new album for U.S. audiences.

The shows received overwhelming praise from audiences and critics alike.  Daily Variety wrote “...a commanding Grace Jones provided a finely tuned display of humanity” and “...the return of Jones was warm and uplifting”. The LA Times ran the headline “Grace Jones bowls over the Bowl” and the New York Times reported that Jones was “lithe, fierce and solid”. Rolling Stone wrote “So many performers are said to be larger than life, but the show biz cliché has never been truer than it is for Grace Jones…the crowd roared as if they’d seen the second coming”.

Born in Jamaica before relocating to Syracuse, New York with her family, Grace Jones embarked on a successful career as a model in New York City and Paris. In 1977 Jones secured her first record deal resulting in a string of dance-club hits including “I Need A Man” and her acclaimed reinvention of Edith Piaf’s classic “La Vie En Rose”. The three disco albums she recorded, “Portfolio” (1977), “Fame” (1978) and “Muse” (1979), generated considerable success in the market and established her as a major recording artist.

During this period Jones became a fixture on the international club scene and was often seen at New York City’s famed nightclub Studio 54. Jones also became a muse to Andy Warhol who photographed her extensively and created a series of iconic portraits of her.

Towards the end of the 1970’s Jones adapted the emerging New Wave music to create a different style for herself. Working with Island Records producers Chris Blackwell, Alex Sadkin and Compass Point All Stars, she recorded the critically acclaimed albums “Warm Leatherette” (1980) and “Nightclubbing” (1981). These included reimagining’s of songs by Sting (“Demolition Man”), Iggy Pop and David Bowie (“Nightclubbing”), Roxy Music (“Love is the Drug”), Astor Piazzolla (“I’ve Seen That Face Before (Libertango)”) and Tom Petty (“Breakdown”).

Both albums included tracks co-written by Jones herself including “A Rolling Stone”, “Feel Up” and most notably, the post-disco dance track “Pull Up to the Bumper” which spent seven weeks as #2 on the U.S. Billboard Hot Dance Club play chart and became a Top 5 single on the U.S. R&B chart.

Parallel to her musical shift was an equally dramatic visual makeover, created in partnership with artist Jean-Paul Goode, with whom she had a son. Jones adapted a severe, androgynous look with square-cut hair and angular, padded clothes. The cover photographs of “Nightclubbing” and “Warm Leatherette” as well as her subsequent albums exemplified this new identity.

Jones’ next release was the dub reggae-influenced “Living My Life” (1982) which featured the self-penned hit “My Jamaican Guy”. In 1985 she worked with Trevor Horn for the conceptual music collage “Slave to the Rhythm” and in 1986 she collaborated with Nile Rogers for “Inside Story” which produced the Billboard 100 Hit, “I’m Not Perfect (But I’m Perfect For You”), one of several songs she co-wrote with Bruce Wooley. “Bulletproof Heart” (1989) spawned the Number 1 U.S. Hot Dance Club Play hit “Love on Top of Love (Killer Kiss)” produced by C&C Music Factory’s David Cole and Robert Clivilles.

Jones is equally famous for her motion picture roles in such features as “Conan the Destroyer” (1984) co-starring Arnold Schwarzenegger, “A View to a Kill” (1985) co-starring Roger Moore as James Bond, the vampire thriller “Vamp” (in which Keith Haring famously painted her body for her role as an undead exotic dancer) and “Boomerang” (1992) co-starring Eddie Murphy (for which she recorded the song “7 Day Weekend”). Her television work includes appearances on “Pee-Wee’s Playhouse Christmas Special” (1988), “Beastmaster” (1999) and “Shaka Zulu: The Citadel” (2001).

Brian Setzer Gives Bluegrass a Rockabilly Spin

With its forays into bluegrass and traditional jazz, Brian Setzer's new album 'Setzer Goes Instru-MENTAL!' (out April 19 on Surfdog Records) has the guitar legend testing new waters and putting his signature Stray Cat stamp on a few instrumental favorites. Setzer didn't set out to create an all-instrumental affair but couldn't resist temptation when the music started heading in that direction.

"I didn’t start writing an instrumental record, per se," says Setzer. "I wrote 7 songs with lyrics, and then all of a sudden I just took a turn and started fooling around with 'Blue Moon of Kentucky,' except without any vocals. I started playing melody chords and thought, 'Wow, this is pretty cool!'  So the direction turned about halfway through my writing. I had never done an instrumental record, but I thought, well, now’s the time."

Setzer wrote six originals and revitalizes five jazz-bluegrass classics – “Blue Moon of Kentucky,” "Earl's Breakdown," "Cherokee," "Be-Bop-A-Lula," and "Lonesome Road." Recording each gave Setzer the chance to revisit old techniques and try new tricks, such as playing banjo on the Earl Scruggs' classic “Earl’s Breakdown,” or substituting jazz chords into traditional bluegrass on the Bluegrass Boys’ “Blue Moon of Kentucky.”

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'Setzer Goes Instru-MENTAL!' Tracklist

(all songs written by Brian Setzer, unless otherwise noted)

1. "Blue Moon of Kentucky" (written by Bill Monroe)

2. "Cherokee" (written by Ray Noble)

3. "Be-Bop-A-Lula" (written by Tex Davis and Gene Vincent)

4. "Earl's Breakdown" (written by Earl Scruggs)

5. "Far Noir East"

6. "Intermission"

7. "Go-Go Godzilla"

8. "Lonesome Road" (written by Gene Austin, Nathaniel Shilkret)

9. "Hillbilly Jazz Meltdown"

10. "Hot Love"

11. "Pickpocket"

John Prine at the Boulder Theater - 03.25.11

97.3 KBCO & the Daily Camera are proud to present John Prine at the Boulder Theater on Friday, March 25th, 2011.

The first time he got onstage to perform – at a Chicago open mic night – there was absolute silence. Here comes a guy nobody had ever seen, a mailman from nearby Maywood, and the very first songs he ever sings are miracles, songs like “Hello In There” and “Angel from Montgomery.” But this stunned silence spelled disaster to Prine. “They just sat there,” he said. “They didn’t even applaud, they just looked at me. I thought, `Uh oh. This is pretty bad.’ I started shuffling my feet and looking around. And then they started applauding and it was a really great feeling. It was like I found out all of a sudden that I could communicate deep feelings and emotions. And to find that out all at once was amazing.”

That one night changed his life. The club-owner offered him a gig, and from that moment on he quickly became one of Chicago’s most beloved local heroes, a guy who would honor the Windy City with as much love and grace as Studs Terkel and Carl Sandburg. Prine soon befriended another local hero, Steve Goodman, and with Goodman he met the world. Kris Kristofferson heard his songs, helped him land a record deal, and soon everyone knew what Chicago already did, that Prine was the real deal. From that first album on, he came known as a genuine “songwriter’s songwriter,” one of the rare ones who writes the songs other songwriters would sell their souls for.  Evidence of this is the long list of songwriters who have recorded his songs, including Johnny Cash, Bonnie Raitt, the Everly Brothers, John Denver, Kris Kristofferson, Carly Simon, Ben Harper, Joan Baez, and many others. Even Bob Dylan was stunned. “His stuff is pure Proustian existentialism,” said Bob Dylan.  . “He’s so good,” said Kristofferson, “we’re gonna have to break his fingers.”

Dylan and the rest were simply recognizing that which we have all come to know, that Prine’s songs are so hauntingly evocative of the laughter and tears inherent in the human condition, so purely precise and finely etched, that lines from them linger in our hearts and minds like dreams, separate from the songs. There’s the rodeo poster from “Angel from Montgomery,” the hole in daddy’s arm and the broken radio (from “Sam Stone”), the old trees that just grow stronger (from “Hello In There.”) The kinds of lines you carry around in your pocket, knowing they’re in there when you need them. With a staggering penchant for detail, a proclivity to be both hilarious and deeply serious (and often in the same song), and a visceral embrace  of roots music, he’s  made the kinds of songs nobody ever dreamed of before, or since.

Born on October 10th, 1946 in Maywood, he grew up spinning Roy Acuff and Hank Williams 78s in his dad’s collection, as well as tuning into WJJD to hear Webb Pierce, Lefty Frizell and others “back to back, all night long.” And then a new kind of music arrived: “I was coming of age just as rock and roll was invented,” he said, and along with his country heroes he added Elvis, Little Richard, Fats Domino, and the one he loved the most, Chuck Berry: “Because he told a story in less than three minutes.”

At 14 he started playing guitar and never stopped, starting with old folk tunes taught to him by his brother Dave. After high school he enlisted in the army, and was happy to be stationed in Germany, far from Viet Nam. He spent most of his time in the barracks playing guitar and singing Lefty Frizzell and Hank Williams songs with a friend.After the army, he became a mailman, which he loved because he could write songs while walking his familiar route. “It was like a library with no books,” he said.

He haunted the fringes of Chicago open mic nights, mostly at the old Fifth Peg on Armitage in Old Town. Once he summoned up the courage to perform, although terrified, he knew he was home. The rest is singer-songwriter history. It was 1971, the dream of the Sixties was over and Goodman and Prine emerged with a new kind of song, eschewing abstractions to write story songs about real people:  “Midwestern mindtrips to the nth degree,” as Dylan put it. Songs with the concrete details and imagery of a novel, but compounded, like Prine’s hero Chuck Berry’s songs, into mini-masterpieces.

After landing his first gig, he went home and wrote more masterpieces that made up his first self-titled debut, released in 1971. It was received with near-unanimous raves: “… absolutely one of the greatest albums ever made,” wrote a hometown paper, “by one of the most creative and evocative songwriters of our time.” There was the recognition then, which has been confirmed by the passage of time, that even among the best, he stood out. “Good songwriters are on the rise,” wrote Rolling Stone, “but John is differently good.”

Fans hungry for meaningful new music discovered him, unconcerned if he was the “new Dylan” or not, as he was often labeled, but drawn to the complex simplicity of his songs, the heady amalgam of sorrow and whimsy. Always seeking to strike a balance in his work, Prine said he wrote funny songs so as to get back to the tragic ones.

He made eight albums on two major labels, including Sweet Revenge, Common Sense, and Bruised Orange. In 1980 he moved to Nashville, and with longtime manager Al Bunetta, formed his own label, Oh Boy Records in 1981. They’ve since released a chain of great records, including 1991’s Grammy-winning The Missing Years, which featured cameos by Bruce Springsteen and Tom Petty. In 2000 he recaptured his own legacy by recording Souvenirs, new recordings of many of his classic songs.

In 1998 he was diagnosed with a rare form of cancer centered in his neck. The removal of a tumor and subsequent radiation seems to have eradicated it completely. Although his singing voice was lowered significantly, he faced his illness with the same blend of wistful humor he instills in his songs. In a post-surgery letter to his fans, he wrote, “Hopefully my neck is looking forward to its job of holding my head up above my shoulders.”

Now he’s back with a brand new live album, John Prine: In Person & On Stage, which contains both solo and duet renditions of some of early songs such as “Angel From Montgomery” (here in a breathtaking duet with Emmylou Harris) as well as later classics such as “Unwed Fathers” (with Iris DeMent) and one of the most poignant songs ever from a husband to a wife, “She Is My Everything.”

“If he’s this good this young,” wrote Rolling Stone in 1971, “time should be on his side.” Truer words have rarely been written. Some four decades since his remarkable debut, Prine has stayed at the top of his game, both as a performer and songwriter. Recently honored at the Library of Congress, he has been elevated from the annals of songwriters into the realm of bonafide American treasures.  Poet Laureate Ted Kooser introduced him at the Library of Congress by likening him to Raymond Carver for making “monuments of ordinary lives.” But the greatest testaments to his lasting legacy are the songs themselves. Unlike so many which belong only to the time in which they emerged, his, like the old trees in “Hello In There,” seem to just grow stronger with the passing years.

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Tickets are on sale at Boulder Theater Box Office. Call (303) 786-7030 for tickets by phone.

Tickets are also available through our website @ www.bouldertheater.com.

Tickets are On Sale Saturday, February 5th!

$40 GA / $48.50 Res / $65 Gold Circle

Old 97's @ Boulder Theater | 1/27/11

Since the Old 97's roared out of Dallas more than fifteen years ago, they have blazed a trail through alt-country and power-pop, led by the piercingly observant lyrics of lead singer Rhett Miller. Each new Old 97's record is hotly anticipated, and rightfully so: "Blame It On Gravity," from 2008, contained some of the band's most deeply felt and passionately played songs. But in a career full of high-water marks, "The Grand Theatre Volume 1″ is perhaps the most ambitious and accomplished set of recordings yet.

The album, the band's eighth, began to come together last year, when Miller was on a solo tour of Europe with Steve Earle. "When I started in this band, I wrote on the road constantly," Miller says. "But I was 23 then, so everything was new to me. Over the years, those strange and wonderful things have begun to feel more commonplace. On the familiar highways, in familiar hotels, it's pretty easy to turn into a zombie. But on this tour, I was in England and Ireland and Scandinavia, places where I haven't spent very much time in, and because of that things seemed somehow fresh. I felt recharged."

The result was a set of songs rooted in specific locations. "The title track, which I wrote in Leeds, is like a series of postcards that try to capture the moment of falling in love; it begins in the Grand Theatre, which is a historic venue there, on the elevator. There's another song, "Every Night Is Friday Night (Without You)," that I wrote, or at least started to write, while I was walking around in Soho. And a song like "The Dance Class" wouldn't have happened if I wasn't in Birmingham, trapped in a hotel, looking out at streets that were bleak and gray except for a dance studio across the way. I imagined an agoraphobic who sees a beautiful girl in that studio and fantasizes about being freed by her." Miller's portraits of love and loneliness are paired with some of the sharpest music the band has ever produced, from the propulsive celebration of "Every Night Is Friday Night (Without You)" to the manic (and almost panicked) energy of "The Dance Class."

More Info / Buy Tickets

Old 97's w/ Langhorne Slim @ Boulder Theater

Since the Old 97's roared out of Dallas more than fifteen years ago, they have blazed a trail through alt-country and power-pop, led by the piercingly observant lyrics of lead singer Rhett Miller. Each new Old 97's record is hotly anticipated, and rightfully so: "Blame It On Gravity," from 2008, contained some of the band's most deeply felt and passionately played songs. But in a career full of high-water marks, "The Grand Theatre Volume 1″ is perhaps the most ambitious and accomplished set of recordings yet.

The album, the band's eighth, began to come together last year, when Miller was on a solo tour of Europe with Steve Earle. "When I started in this band, I wrote on the road constantly," Miller says. "But I was 23 then, so everything was new to me. Over the years, those strange and wonderful things have begun to feel more commonplace. On the familiar highways, in familiar hotels, it's pretty easy to turn into a zombie. But on this tour, I was in England and Ireland and Scandinavia, places where I haven't spent very much time in, and because of that things seemed somehow fresh. I felt recharged."

The result was a set of songs rooted in specific locations. "The title track, which I wrote in Leeds, is like a series of postcards that try to capture the moment of falling in love; it begins in the Grand Theatre, which is a historic venue there, on the elevator. There's another song, "Every Night Is Friday Night (Without You)," that I wrote, or at least started to write, while I was walking around in Soho. And a song like "The Dance Class" wouldn't have happened if I wasn't in Birmingham, trapped in a hotel, looking out at streets that were bleak and gray except for a dance studio across the way. I imagined an agoraphobic who sees a beautiful girl in that studio and fantasizes about being freed by her." Miller's portraits of love and loneliness are paired with some of the sharpest music the band has ever produced, from the propulsive celebration of "Every Night Is Friday Night (Without You)" to the manic (and almost panicked) energy of "The Dance Class."

More Info / Buy Tickets

The Dresden Dolls Announce First Tour in 3 Years

After a long hiatus, The Dresden Dolls are thrilled to announce their first live tour in 3 years! The pioneering and influential "punk cabaret" duo comprised of Amanda Palmer (piano, vocals) and Brian Viglione (drums, guitar, bass) will be kicking off a few weeks of dates starting on Halloween at Irving Plaza in NYC. The date marks the exact 10th anniversary of the birth of the band (Viglione met Palmer on Halloween night of 2000, at an art/salon party at Palmer's house, at which she was playing her solo songs on piano.) "Amanda's songwriting was so brilliant and raw, I couldn't have designed a more perfectly suited counterpart. I knew then I'd found my musical accomplice.", says Viglione. They will also make a stop in New Orleans for a special gulf oil spill relief-benefit for BTNEP, an organization that is working to preserve, protect, and restore the Barataria and Terrebonne estuaries of Louisiana.

Since The Dolls' last performance (which was at Rock The Vote in DC on the Inauguration Day of President Obama), Palmer has been tirelessly busy building her solo career and online empire, centered around the 2008 release of her Ben Folds-Produced solo album "Who Killed Amanda Palmer". The album was accompanied by a hardback-book of the same name and included a collection of dead photographs of Palmer and short stores by author Neil Gaiman (to whom Palmer recently became engaged). Palmer also recently released a donation-based Radiohead covers ukulele EP titled "Amanda Palmer Performs the Popular Hits of Radiohead on Her Magical Ukulele", setting the tech community abuzz about how a donation-based model can earn a mid-level artist a living wage.  Before they embark on tour, Palmer will be starring as the Emcee in the American Repertory Theater’s production of Kander & Ebb's dark weimar musical "Cabaret". The production opened August 31, 2010 and runs through October 29. Many of the dates are already sold out. More information can be found HERE on A.R.T.'s site.

"The time apart has done nothing but given both of us an appreciation of how incredibly special and powerful our band is," says Palmer. "Our live musical chemistry is completely unique, almost magical, and we don't take that for granted. I can't wait to get on a stage with Brian again. Nobody hits the drums like that man - he's in a class all his own. And when we play together live, we create an entire world we can't otherwise create."

Meanwhile, drummer/producer and talented musical jack-of-all-trades Brian Viglione has appeared on 30 albums since 2008, most notably, Nine Inch Nails' "Ghosts I–IV". Viglione's latest hard-hitting album, "Face Of The Sun", which he produced and co-wrote, is available digitally via Bandcamp and will be featured on his new website , www.brianviglione.com. Amidst the busy recording and teaching schedule, he's toured internationally with The World/Inferno Friendship Society, Franz Nicolay, Black Tape For A Blue Girl, Martin Bisi, Botanica, and The Cliks.  "A great strength of the band has always been that we've always given each other time to explore creative areas outside The Dresden Dolls, then bring what we've learned back to the table. Our love for the music and playing together is mirrored by the continual support of our fans, and we're more than ready to deliver the goods to them."

The current wave of theatrical artists are citing The Dolls and their flamboyant emotional and theatrical antics as an inspiration, from up-and-coming theatrical-pop artist and Dolls’ fan Marina & The Diamonds to Lady Gaga (who lists The Dresden Dolls as an influence on her MySpace).

"It's been really inspiring to see an evolution towards theatrical freedom among indie bands over the last ten years", says Palmer. "When we were starting out in 2000, we were surrounded by the likes of The Vines and The Strokes. People often wrote us off as a gimmick because of our weird theatrical bent. Now we're surrounded by comrades...Antony, The Scissor Sisters, The Decembrists, Arcade Fire, CocoRosie, the list goes on and on. People aren't as afraid take risks onstage. It's inspiring, and I'm proud we've played our little part in the continuum of empowered freaky people."

Dates Are As Follows:

Oct 31 - NEW YORK CITY, NY@ Irving Plaza (w/ Surprise Guests)

Nov 12 - NEW ORLEANS, LA@ Tipitina's (w/ Jason Webley)

Nov 13 - ATLANTA, GA@ The Buckhead Theatre (w/ Lille)

Nov 14 - LEXINGTON, KY@ Buster's Billiards & Backroom (w/ Chico Fellini)

Nov 16 - ST. LOUIS, MO@ The Pageant (w/ Sleepy Kitty)

Nov 17 - CHICAGO, IL@ The Vic Theatre (w/ Mucca Pazza)

Nov 19th - DALLAS, TX@ Granada Theatre (w/ Girl In A Coma)

Nov 20 - HOUSTON, TX@ Fitzgerald's (w/ Girl In A Coma)

Nov 21 - AUSTIN, TX@ La Zona Rosa (w/ Girl In A Coma)