hooks

Tommy Keene's 'Behind the Parade' coming on August 30

When you’ve been pursuing your craft for the better part of 30 years and approximately a dozen albums without the benefit of universal adulation, you’re either wholly obsessed or doggedly determined. In Tommy Keene’s case, it’s likely a mixture of both. Hailed by some as power pop’s most fervent champion, he has been obsessed with making music for nearly three decades, toiling away with impressive results while winning the respect of a small but loyal group of listeners who hold everything he’s ever offered in the highest esteem. Long before now, Keene should have been welcomed into the pop pantheon, alongside McCartney, Rundgren, Wilson and all the other meticulous musicians long acknowledged for their creativity and consistency. Ask his devotees and they’ll tell you Tommy Keene is the equal of them all.

Behind the Parade, Keene’s latest album and his third release on Second Motion (including last year’s career spanning retrospective You Hear Me), schduled for August 30, 2011 release in three formats (CD, mp3 and limited-edition 180-gram vinyl), provides the latest body of proof. Like its predecessors, the disc affirms his pop proficiency, mastery of his craft and his ability to ensure instant accessibility given the benefit of emphatic hooks, irresistible refrains and the kind of vibrant, jangly melodies that bring to mind a distinctly ’60s sensibility. Keene may once have worshiped at the altar of the Beatles, Byrds and Beach Boys, but his synthesis of sounds transcends these retro references and stirs it into something that’s wholly fresh and exhilarating.

Ranging from the proto-Keene jangle of “Already Made Up Your Mind” and the edgy, power pop (no, he doesn’t mind that description — much) storytelling of “Running For Your Life” and “His Mother’s Son” to the moody, ambient instrumental “La Castana” and the horn-infused opener “Deep Six Saturday,” Behind the Parade finds Tommy ably taking a few risks while managing to play to his considerable strengths. Behind the Parade, along with his recent output, shows Keene is akin to an athlete rediscovering his prime, only in this artist’s case, he never left it.

Back in 1984, a six-song platter of pop perfection titled Places That Are Gone (Dolphin) put Tommy Keene onto the CMJ charts and atop the Village Voice EP of the Year poll. Blatantly romantic, unapologetically melodic, bittersweet but absolutely invigorating, it still stands as a powerful statement, not only establishing Keene as a unique singer-songwriter, but also as a guitarist with a sound as distinctive as Pete Townshend or Johnny Marr.

Keene made enough noise in the early ’80s to get the majors involved, and in 1986 he released Songs From the Film on Geffen. Produced by Beatles engineer Geoff Emerick, the album featured two MTV videos, “Listen to Me” and a re-recording of Places That Are Gone’s title track, and spent 12 weeks on Billboard’s Top 200. The 1998 CD reissue of Songs also includes one of the all-time great Keene rockers, “Run Now,” with inspired rhythm section work from drummer Doug Tull and bassist Ted Niceley, plus a terrific extended guitar solo. The singer as well as the song appeared in the Anthony Michael Hall movie Out of Bounds.


After releasing the Run Now EP in 1986, the original Tommy Keene group, which also included guitarist Billy Connelly, disbanded. Keene headed down to Ardent Studios in Memphis to record with producers John Hampton and Joe Hardy. The result was Based on Happy Times (Geffen, 1989). The ironically titled disc is the darkest album in the Keene catalog. Although his best material has always been infused with melancholia, Happy Times’ tracks like “The Biggest Conflict” and “A Way Out” reveal a more fatalistic outlook. The guitars are heavier, there is less jangle, and there aren’t as many hooky vocal harmonies. It is a beautifully crafted, sometimes brooding, arty rock record.

In 1996, Keene released Ten Years After (Matador), his first full-length album of all-new material in seven years. Produced by Keene and recorded by pop music wunderkind Adam Schmitt, the album contains classic pop hooks and the loudest guitars to date. For his next effort, Isolation Party (Matador), Keene recruited an all-star cast, getting some fine instrumental and vocal performances from former Gin Blossom Jesse Valenzuela and Wilco’s Jay Bennett and Jeff Tweedy. A live disc called Showtunes (Parasol), released in 2000, was followed up in 2001 with The Merry-Go-Round Broke Down for the SpinArt label. Tommy used his next effort, Drowning: A Tommy Keene Miscellany (Not Lame), to clean out his closets of 20 years’ worth of rarities, demos and unreleased sessions. One of the best hodgepodge records you’ll ever hear, more than one critic felt Tommy’s spring-cleaning LP bested many greatest hits packages.

Back on the road in 2004, Keene and band joined Guided By Voices on the East and West Coast legs of their farewell tour. Apart from some great gigs, the shows also led to Keene joining Pollard as a member of his post GBV band, The Ascended Masters, for their 2006 U.S. tour and a limited-edition live LP, Moon (Merge). The year also saw the release of Crashing the Ether (Eleven Thirty), which was performed and recorded primarily by Tommy himself at home with drums by John Richardson and contributions from regular Keene band members and friends. Sonically, the album is dazzling, with big drums and open, ringing guitars, and lyrically it was arguably a great leap forward.

Tommy quickly followed up Crashing the Ether with Blues and Boogie Shoes, an LP with Robert Pollard under the Keene Brothers moniker. Although side projects can sometimes be less than wholehearted efforts, tracks such as “The Naked Wall” or “Death of the Party” — as good a song as Keene or Pollard have written together or separately — show that neither artist held anything back.

2009’s In the Late Bright (Second Motion) displayed the full range of Keene’s songcraft over 11 tracks. The album kicked into high gear with “Late Bright,” a minor-key rocker that gets its tense and dramatic work done in two minutes flat. From there on out, the album delivered a fan-friendly collection of melodic hooks, vocal harmonies, inventive chord progressions and great guitar playing.

Keene summed up his solo output to-date with Tommy Keene You Hear Me: A Retrospective 1983-2009 (Second Motion), a two-CD collection holding over 40 of his best tunes (including an unreleased acoustic take of Crashing the Ether’s “Black and White New York”). Even then, fans debated what he included vs. what he left off — further proof of the man’s enduring songwriting prowess.

Allies Release Mixtape w/ Interview, EP Release Show

Allies is thrilled to celebrate the release of the Hour of the Wolf EP with a special EP release show at Le Bain in New York City’s Standard Hotel on March 10th at 9pm.  Having garnered appreciation from DJs all over, Allies’ Brian Suarez had released a DJ Mixtape which premiered on Interview Magazine today.

Allies custom blend of synth-pop and electro is replete with heartbreaking vocal melodies, irresistible rhythms and Brian Suarez’s chimerical voice.  “Oceans” is a tale of love by the sea that will command you to the dance floor. The percolating synths of “Hour of the Wolf” punctuate the anthemic chorus and propulsive hooks. “Ghosts” has a spellbinding electronic rumble and stutter that adds a sinister element to the dreamy vocals. The playful “Springtime (All Over My Face)” is a flirtatious duet about having fun in the warm weather that will make you feel like winter is already over. Allies have created an EP for your headphones and favorite dance floor that is compelling without ever sacrificing the fun melodies.

Release Party w/DJ Alex English @ Le Bain at The Standard NYC, March 10 @ 9PM!

CHARLIE MARS - AUSTIN CITY LIMITS MUSIC FESTIVAL - 10/8/10

Acclaimed singer/songwriter Charlie Mars will be performing at the Austin City Limits Music Festival on Friday, October 8th @ 12:20 PM.  Charlie has been on tour in support of his current CD, "Like A Bird, Like A Plane."

While in town for the festival, he’ll be doing a short live set for KGSR on Thursday, October 7th at Threadgills.  The station will be doing a live broadcast from the venue at 8:30am.  Then he'll perform at the Austin Ventures Stage at ACL on Friday, October 8th at 12:20pm, followed by a Waterloo Records signing.  Charlie will then be doing a solo show from 3:15pm to 3:30pm on the Austin Kiddie Limits Stage. And on Saturday, October 9th, he'll  top it off with a show at Threadgills at 10pm.

Mars is known for his compelling live performances.  “When he’s onstage, songs with deep grooves get some breathing room, and his lush choruses inevitably lead to raucous audience sing-alongs,” said Esquire.

Mars recorded the album in Austin with drummer J.J. Johnson (John Mayer), keyboardist John Ginty (Citizen Cope) and bass players George Reiff (Jakob Dylan) and Dave Monzie (Fiona Apple). The video for lead single “Listen to the Darkside” (a nod to Pink Floyd) featured “Weeds” star Mary Louise Parker and was directed by Danny Clinch.

"Like A Bird, Like A Plane," was praised by The Washington Post for its "lush musical vignettes" while Jambase called it "a fine addition to the canon of one of the South's most under appreciated songwriters." "Charlie's sultry alternative-southern-soul mastery sounds like what the lead singers for Coldplay or The Verve might sound like if they grew up in the south listening to REM and Nick Drake," said Jackson Free Press and the Pittsburgh Tribune called the album "mesmerizing."  "Mars combines the lyrical, melodic, and rhythmic gifts of Paul Simon with the dark, rootsy quality of Bruce Springsteen," said Berkshire Living.

Born in Arkansas and raised in Mississippi, Mars released three independent albums before signing with V2. His self-titled, 2004 major label debut was hailed by Rolling Stone as "Big emotional rock from Mississippi with a knack for hooks, and the hooks here have real barbs: They tug at you and just might draw some blood." High profile tours with artists such as R.E.M., KT Tunstall, Citizen Cope, John Butler Trio and Bob Schneider followed. When V2 folded, Mars returned to his independent roots, financing "Like A Bird, Like A Plane" himself, and releasing it on Rockingham Records in conjunction with the Nashville-based Thirty Tigers.