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My Morning Jacket Take Over YouTube’s Homepage

Louisville, Kentucky’s My Morning Jacket take over YouTube today with 4 clips featured on the site’s homepage, including the premiere of the eye-popping, surreal video for “Holdin On To Black Metal.”  The guys gave a early preview of the video  last night when several members posted it on their Google+ accounts, resulting in one of the first music video premieres shared within Google's new social network.

Fans can also check out a special intro to the video, which is also an invite to catch the group live at Lollapalooza this weekend (set time is 8pm EDT this Saturday, August 6th).  Additionally My Morning Jacket have curated a playlist of 18 videos of some of their favorite musical moments by artists like Marvin Gaye, Stevie Nicks, and Loretta Lynn.

The video for “Black Metal” was filmed during whirlwind period shortly before the quintent’s new album, Circuital, was released while the band was getting ready for their big hometown show (filmed by Todd Haynes for AmEx’s Unstaged series.)  The band kept things local by working with the Louisville-based Sole Solution Studio for the clip, and filmed it at the idiosyncratic local watering hole Jim Porter’s Good Time Emporium.  The video also includes footage from the Jacket’s electrifying 2011 Bonnaroo performance.  The guys kick off the next leg of their US tour tonight in St. Louis and will play select dates with Neko Case as the opener during August.

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My Morning Jacket US Tour Dates:

* = w/Neko Case

8/2: St. Louis, MO The Pageant
8/3: Kansas City, MO Uptown Theater
8/4: Denver, CO @ Red Rocks Amphitheatre
8/7: Indianapolis, IN The Lawn at White River State Park*
8/8: Columbus, OH LC Pavilion*
8/10: Pittsburgh, PA Stage AE*
8/12: Columbia, MD Merriweather Post Pavilion*
8/13: Bangor, ME @ The KahBang Festival*
8/14: Boston, MA Bank Of America Pavilion*
8/16: Rochester Hills, MI Meadow Brook*
8/17: Cincinnati, OH PNC Pavilion at Riverbend Music Center*
8/19: Tuscaloosa, AL Tuscaloosa Amphitheater*
8/20: Alpharetta, GA Verizon Wireless Amphitheater*
8/21: Charlotte, NC Time Warner Cable Uptown Amphitheater*
8/23: Philadelphia, PA Mann Center for the Performing Arts*
8/24:  Charlottesville, VA @ nTelos Wireless Pavilion*
9/17: Austin, TX @ Austin City Limits Music Festival

European Tour Dates:

11/2: Gladgow, GB @ ABC
11/3: Birmingham, UK @ Institute
11/5: Leeds, UK @ Academy
11/6: Manchester, GB @ Academy
11/7: London, UK @ Roundhouse
11/8: Bexhill, UK @ De La Warr Pavilion
11/10: Antwerp, BE @ Trix
11/11: Luxembourg, LU @ Den Atelier
11/12: Koln, DE @ Luxor
11/4: Amsterdam, NL @ Paradiso
11/16: Berlin, DE @ Festall Kreuuzburg
11/17: Lund, SE @ Mejeriet
11/18: Oslo, NO @ Sentrum Scene
11/19: Stockholm, SE @ Munchem Brewery

Boris Garcia: Today We Sail

Dear Music Friend of mine:

As we all know, bands with genuine musicians have a life cycle. No matter their level of chops, they start as beginners with lots of energy and perhaps less of the subtle judgment skills that great musicians have -- the ability to listen to each other, the ability to know when not to play.

And if they don’t fall into the snares of ego and delusion, they grow. They listen more, both to other music and each other, and they hear more (two different things!), and they reach a higher level.

Boris Garcia is the band that just fell together, and now with Today We Sail, three CDs later, they’re playing at a place that’s ever richer, ever more creative. The simple acoustic feel of their first work has become much more varied: a case in point is “Walking Barefoot,” which begins with a hard-edged rock sound that becomes lovely mandolins and then almost sounds like a full orchestra – an effect they get from just a very few strings (Producer Tim Carbone’s fiddle and Bud Burroughs’ mandolin) – amazing. And Bob Stirner’s lyrics are getting deeper, more evocative: “I’m not indifferent much or maybe, surely, I’ll be on my way, I’ll be on my way/You can’t see Santa if you don’t believe, I’ll be on my way…”

Jeff Otto’s whimsicality maintains its strength here, with “Song Dog” and “Deaf Dumb and Blind” – “But why can’t I see, that love’s for fools and I’m a fool so love’s for me” – but the playing is truly impressive, with piano punctuations sliding against the pedal steel – very hip, very deft. In fact, Chip Desnoyers’ pedal steel (with mandolin in “Song Dog”) is all over Today We Sail, and it’s powerful stuff.

Boris’ songs range from the power rock chords of “Mighty High,” which comes across as almost Springsteenish to me, to “Long Black Hair,” which takes me to “Long Black Veil,” to “Good Home,” which is a sweet love song that opens into a grand psychedelic guitar jam. And lots more.

They’re all over the musical map, but in this case it’s a good thing.

My, how the kids have grown.

Press: D. McNally, dennismcnally@mac.com

Today We Sail is available from www.borisgarcia.com or www.amazon.com

The Warner Brothers Studio Albums + Dead.net exclusive

What a long, strange trip it's been! In celebration of the 40th Anniversary of Workingman's Dead and American Beauty, we proudly present THE WARNER BROS. STUDIO ALBUMS, a five-LP boxed set commemorating those tremendous and transformative early years. Due September 21st, the collection contains The Grateful Dead (1967), Workingman's Dead, and American Beauty (1970), plus the original mixes for Anthem Of The Sun (1968) and Aoxomoxoa (1969), available on vinyl for the first time in nearly 40 years!

This stunning set also features detailed replicas of the original albums housed in a hard-shell case with an accompanying 12" x 12" book containing unpublished photos and new liner notes by our friend Blair Jackson. And as always, we've ensured the highest degree of quality - these albums were pressed on 180-gram vinyl at RTI using lacquers cut from the original analog masters. Now all you've got to do is gently place the needle on the record and slip into auditory bliss!

Order from Dead.net and receive an exclusive reproduction of a rare 1968 7" single (in a picture sleeve) that features the studio version of "Dark Star" (b/w "Born Cross-Eyed"), clocking in at a concise 2:38. You'll also receive a reproduction of a rare 1967 promotional poster from the Warner Bros. Records archive. The 7" and poster are yours only when you place your order at Dead.net.

Jakob Dylan & Three Legs ft: Neko Case & Kelly Hogan

Live radio show with Nick and Helen Forster featuring music and conversation with the Jakob Dylan & Three Legs (ft: Neko Case, Kelly Hogan, Paul Rigby, Jon Rauhouse, Tom Ray & Barry Mirochnick). Being the son of one of the most influential, innovative, eccentric, and unique songwriters in the history of Western pop music probably opened some doors for Jakob Dylan when he started his own musical career, but being Bob Dylan's son was just as likely a heavy load to carry as well, and the good news is that the younger Dylan has handled the pressure with relative élan.
He studied at private schools in L.A. and New York, and eased into the music business in the late '80s when he formed the Wallflowers with guitarist Tobi Miller, keyboard player Rami Jaffee, bassist Barrie Maguire, and drummer Peter Yanowitz. Featuring a classic heartland sound that was closer to Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers or John Mellencamp than it was to anything Bob Dylan recorded, the band signed to Virgin and released a self-titled debut album in 1992, but it sold poorly and Virgin dropped the band.
Dylan assembled a second version of the Wallflowers -- guitarist Michael Ward, bassist Greg Richling, and drummer Mario Calire -- keeping only Jaffee. The "new" group signed to Interscope Records and recorded its second album with producer (and Dylan family friend) T Bone Burnett. Bringing Down the Horse was released in 1996, producing the alternative radio hit "6th Avenue Heartache." A second single from the album, "One Headlight," followed later in the year, and by the spring of 1997 it had become a Top Ten hit, firmly establishing the Wallflowers as a legitimate commercial band, and while the media naturally played up Dylan's connection to his iconic father, the Wallflowers had their own sound and Jakob's similarities to his dad as both a singer and a songwriter were only occasional at best. A third single from Bringing Down the Horse, "The Difference," was issued in 1997, and the album hung on as a big seller throughout 1997, and in 1998 "One Headlight" won Grammys for Best Rock Song and Best Rock Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal.
The obvious next move would have been to rush out a third album, but Dylan and the Wallflowers instead took a long four-year break from recording, returning in October 2000 to release Breach. The album, although quite impressive, went largely ignored. The more mainstream Red Letter Days appeared a year later in 2001, and following a two-year hiatus, Rebel, Sweetheart was issued in 2003, closing out the band's deal with Interscope. Dylan signed a solo contract with Columbia Records, his dad's longtime label, in 2006, and issued the acoustic-based Seeing Things, produced by Rick Rubin and recorded at Rubin's Hollywood Hills studio, under his own name in 2008, leaving the status of the Wallflowers up in the air. Jakob's new record, "Women & Country" will drop April 6, 2010.
In 2006, SPIN Magazine called Neko Case "one of pop music's best" voices, and Interview Magazine hailed her album Fox Confessor Brings The Flood as "one of the most original, beguiling, honest records of the year." The album also earned Case Female Artist of the Year honors from the PLUG Independent Music Awards, and a Top 10 placement in the Village Voice's annual Pazz and Jop Critics Poll of the year's best releases. Fox Confessor was Case's first album to debut in the Billboard Top 100, and has sold nearly 200,000 copies in the U.S. alone.

Kelly's Hogan's voice is so versatile it can wrap itself around any song, in any style, be it torchy jazz, country weepers, soul-fueled bump and grinders or long-lost pop nuggets, and transform them into something all her own. Hogan began to hone her mellifluously spooky welter of torch songs and honky tonk anthems when she fronted the legendary peg-legged cabaret quartet, The Jody Grind, and then fanned the flames of her bummer-rock fixation while playing guitar for Orbisonic southern gothic punks, The Rock*A*Teens. She has also kept her bad self busy with appearances on some clever and popular Bloodshot compilations, and she did a split single with Neko Case. The past few years has seen Kelly singing with fellow Georgians the Drive By Truckers, the kiddie-punk ensemble Wee Hairy Beasties, the hopped up jazz combo The Wooden Leg and recording and touring with Neko Case as her back up singer.
Sunday March 28, 8pm
97.3 KBCO presents
e-TOWN: Jakob Dylan & Three Legs
ft: Neko Case & Kelly Hogan
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Tickets are on sale through the Boulder Theater box office | Internet 24-7 at www.bouldertheater.com | Phone: During box office hours 303-786-7030

MEDICAL MARIJUANA CASE UP NEXT FOR COURT

NORML supports the right of adults to use marijuana responsibly, whether for medical or personal purposes - for the Grateful Web

The marijuana she smokes every two waking hours makes life bearable for Angel Raich.  It eases the pain from an inoperable brain tumor, scoliosis and several other permanent disabilities.  It's the only thing her doctors will prescribe, because she has severe allergies that cause violent reactions to traditional medicine.

 

In Oakland, Calif., where Raich lives, that's no problem.  A 1996 state law permits patients to grow and smoke marijuana on doctors' recommendations.

 

But on Monday, the U.S.  Supreme Court will hear arguments in a case that's likely to settle a conflict between that California law and a 1970 federal ban on illegal drugs.

 

The Justice Department says federal authority is supreme in this matter, and the Drug Enforcement Administration already has raided one California patient's house and destroyed her cannabis plants.  If the court favors the government's view, more raids would follow in the 11 mostly Western states that have legalized medical marijuana.

 

Anti-drug groups support the federal government, saying approving medical marijuana could boost support for the recreational use of drugs.

 

Raich and her supporters say medical marijuana is a matter for the states to decide, and for doctors to decide for their patients.

 

"Without cannabis, my life would be a death sentence," Raich, 39, says on a Web site about her struggle.  "Cannabis was responsible for getting me out of my wheelchair and restoring mobility on the whole right side of my body.  For years I felt as if I were suffering in hell.  I will not go back to hell for anyone or anything."

The case is one of the most watched on the Supreme Court's docket this term, one that involves the justices in a high-profile social issue and tests court conservatives' commitment to a line of decisions that restrain federal intrusion into state matters.

It began in California in 2002, when DEA officers raided the Oroville home of Diane Monson, who was growing marijuana in her garden to ease back pain.  The raid at Monson's home - and several others - was tied to a crackdown on medical marijuana inspired in part by the war on terrorism.  President Bush has said the illegal drug trade helps finance terrorists.

Under Chief Justice William H.  Rehnquist, the high court generally has favored state authority over federal influence, establishing a long line of cases that have reduced Congress' authority to regulate interstate commerce.

But the Supreme Court took a stab at curbing marijuana use in 2001 when it ruled against clubs that distributed medical marijuana, which the clubs had deemed a "medical necessity." The ruling forced Raich's supplier to close but left unsettled whether federal authorities could block states from permitting marijuana to be used for medical reasons.