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Adrian Belew Power Trio ft. members of King Crimson at Boulder Theater

Boulder Weekly is proud to present Adrian Belew Power Trio with Stickmen featuring Tony Levin and Pat Mastelotto from King Crimson at the Boulder Theater on Tuesday, October 11th, 2011.  Tickets go on sale Friday, June 24th for $25 General Admission, $30 Reserved and $40 Gold Circle.

“2 of a Perfect Trio” Tour

King Crimson players Adrian Belew, Tony Levin and Pat Mastelotto keep very busy individually when Crimson's not active, but now, a historic joint tour: Adrian Belew Power Trio will headline the bill, with Stick Men (featuring Tony and Pat) opening.

And of course, how could they resist joining together for a Crim-centric extended encore - after their respective sets we'll see them reconfigure as Ade/Tony/Pat trio, morphing into the double trio lineup like King Crimson featured in the 90's.

The tour name, 2 of a Perfect Trio, harkens to the King Crimson song "3 of a Perfect Pair"

Adrian Belew's trio features the amazing bassist Julie Slick, and NYC drummer Tobias Ralph - perfect complements to Belew's extraordinary guitar playing and singing.

Stick Men presents Tony Levin's virtuosic playing on the Chapman Stick, with Pat Mastelotto giving his unique progressive drumming on both acoustic and electronic drums. Markus Reuter rounds out the band, playing his self-designed touch style guitar.

For more information please visit www.adrianbelew.net

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Adrian Belew Power Trio

with Stickmen ft. Tony Levin & Pat Mastelotto from King Crimson

Boulder Theater

Tuesday, October 11th, 2011

Doors:  6:30 pm

Show Time:  7:30 pm

My Suitcase Is Always Packed | Red Stick Ramblers | Streets 5.19

red-stick-ramblersThe Red Stick Ramblers return on May 19th with My Suitcase Is Always Packed, their fifth album and second for Sugar Hill Records. That rare young roots band that both embodies and transcends their influences, The Red Stick Ramblers continue to hone their unique hybrid of Cajun, honky-tonk, and swing (Western and otherwise) on their most visceral, personal album yet. The eleven new originals (in both English and Cajun French) are structurally daring and lyrically evocative, while still resounding proudly with the echoes of the traditions that inspired them. A pair of vintage Cajun numbers cement the band's undeniable affection for and mastery of classic Louisiana music.

 Featuring the twin-fiddle frontline of Kevin Wimmer and Linzay Young backed by the versatile rhythm section of Chas Justus (guitar), Eric Frey (bass), and Glenn Fields (drums), The Red Stick Ramblers have been astonishing audiences at dancehalls, festivals, and concert halls around the world since 2002, when they first emerged from Baton Rouge, Louisiana. My Suitcase Is Always Packed, produced by the band with Grammy-winner Gary Paczosa and Brandon Bell, is their most wide ranging album yet - from the surging Cajun opener "Je T'aime Pas Mieux" and the haunting banjo and triangle driven "Nonc' Yorick" to the almost casually ingenious, charismatic swing of "Doggone My Time" and the title track. Brilliantly balancing the hard-driving and the heart-breaking, My Suitcase Is Always Packed is the sound of The Red Stick Ramblers in full flight, at once achingly familiar and infectiously surprising.

 

 

"Like all great bands," reflects fellow musician Dirk Powell in his powerful liner notes, "The Ramblers have grown over the years, grown together, grown individually, raised the stakes time and again. This time, they've dug deeper and reached further than ever."

Hey Barry Bonds, I cannot stick up for you any longer..

Barry Bonds hits one out of Pac Bell- for the Grateful Web

Dear Barry Bonds:

Like many people in my generation (I am 34), you have been the greatest baseball player I have known.  Since the mid 70's as a kid in New Jersey watching & attending Yankee games, I have watched great players come and go, including Nolan Ryan, Don Mattingly, Reggie Jackson, and so many other great ball players, but in the last five years or so, you have made many of their accomplishments seem less extraordinary.  I remember Reggie hitting three homers in the 78 World Series, I remember Bucky Dent hitting his pinch hit homer to beat Boston. I remember the Mets winning in 1986; I have so many great memories from baseball.

Until now, I have been naive over steroid use.  Now, I remember when you first came into the league in the late 80's, hell I even remember watching you in the College World Series.  In spite of knowing how thin you were, I refused to believe your gigantic increase in size in your mid 30's was simply a result of your work-out regiment.  My dad, himself a huge baseball fan, has been turned off from baseball in the last 10 years, mostly because of how many balls leaving the ballpark.  I told him it's because guys are bigger and stronger nowadays, Dad.  However, he said there's a lot more to do that that, including bringing the ballparks in (Yankee Stadium is a perfect example), pitching is not what it used to be (Allie Reynolds is an example my dad gives), etc.  Regardless, in 2001, when Barry hit his 73 dingers, according to my perception, it was simply the most amazing season Barry or anyone other slugger has ever had and my Dad should accept it. I, like many other baseball fans were watching with excitement as Barry belted shot after shot. I told my dad, before Marris hit 61, nobody believed someone who hit more than the Babe did when he hit 60. It's just an evolution of the sport because of bigger and stronger ballplayers. Well, I was wrong. It's not some amazing work-out routine making modern day ballplayers bigger and stronger, its steroids.  Barry never hit more than 50 dingers in his life before that 2001 season. What's worse, now that we know you did take steroids; you're trying to tell us you didn't know what you were taking!? C'mon, Barry, we've been duped long enough.  100 years from now, when kids talk about Barry Bonds like we talk about the Babe now, or Mickey Mantle, or some real legend, I just hope the kids also say, 'oh, yea he hit a lot of homers, but he took steroids to enhance his performance,' whereas the Babe or Hank Aaron never did.  You always have an asterisk next to your name, *Barry.

Regrettably,

Mike Moran, Grateful Web