generation

The Malah Spring & Summer Tour Dates

The three-headed livetronica force The Malah is hitting the road all summer. From club dates along the West Coast with Signal Path, to marquee sets at festivals across the Midwest and up the Atlantic, The Malah will be pushing their genre-defying brand of electronic exploration upon thousands of fans across the country. Known for their stimulating sets fusing the jam and rock aesthetic with electro, trance, and dubstep, The Malah uses the latest music technology to elevate their sound--at once seeming much bigger than a three piece, but having the deft maneuverability of a tight-knit group. Guitarist Brandon Maynard layers intricate melodies on top of the solid groove battery of bassist Elliott Vaughn and drummer Seth Fankhauser. All three move fluidly between the organic and synthetic, triggering samples and tackling complex synth runs. Between their stunning technical ability, and the visceral lighting design, fans are treated to a full-on sensory experience at each and every performance.

The Malah begins its summer run Memorial Day Weekend at Lightning in a Bottle. This eclectic and intimate festival in Silverado, CA has been known for its outlandish productions and act-breaking bills. Throughout June, The Malah will support Signal Path at a string of dates up and down the West Coast, from Oregon and Washington, to the southern tip of California in San Diego. Then it's off to the brand new electronic explosion of The Blastoff in Ohio, before STS9's Re:Generation, The Big Up, Rootwire, and Camp Barefoot. More festival dates are sure to be added, as word of The Malah's prowess spreads from coast to coast.

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May 27 – 30 :: Lightning in a Bottle :: Silverado, CA
w/ Pretty Lights, Thievery Corporation, Bonobo

June 1 :: Neurolux :: Boise, ID
w/ Signal Path

June 2 :: Rotture :: Portland, OR
w/ Signal Path

June 3 :: Sunset Tavern :: Seattle, WA
w/ Signal Path

June 7 :: Caspar Inn :: Caspar, CA
w/ Signal Path

June 8 :: Moe’s Alley :: Santa Cruz, CA
w/ Signal Path

June 9 :: Bottom of the Hill :: San Francisco, CA
w/ Signal Path

June 10 :: The Mint :: Los Angeles, CA
w/ Signal Path

June 11 :: Winston’s Beach Club :: San Diego, CA
w/ Signal Path

June 17 :: Kinetic Playground :: Chicago, IL

June 17 – 19 :: The Blastoff Festival :: Bellefontaine, OH
w/ OTT, Archnemesis….

June 23 – 26 :: Re:Generation Festival @ Horning’s Hideout :: North Plains, OR
w/ STS9, Bassnectar….

Jul 28 – 30 :: The Big Up Festival :: Ghent , NY
w/ EOTO, Big Gigantic

Aug 5 – 7 :: Rootwire Music and Arts Festival :: Logan, OH
w/ Papadosio, Emancipator, Bluetech...

Aug 18-20 :: Camp Barefoot :: Bartow, WV
w/ The New Deal

Additional dates and info tba soon.. Stay tuned

Poly Styrene 1957-2011

We can confirm that the beautiful Poly Styrene, who has been a true fighter,  won her battle on Monday evening (4/25/11)  to go to higher places. Poly Styrene was born Marianne Elliot Said on June 3, 1957. She passed away due to cancer.

Poly Styrene was a punk amongst punks. A groundbreaking presence that left an unrepeatable mark on the musical landscape, she made history the moment she uttered, “Some people think little girls should be seen and not heard but I think oh bondage up yours!” The influence of Poly and X-ray Spex has been felt far and wide ever since. The seminal album Germ Free Adolescents is a landmark work and a primary influence on Britpop and Riot Grrrl. At the center of it was Poly Styrene, a bi-racial feminist punk with the perfect voice to soundtrack rebellion. Poly never sacrificed the intelligence or the fun in her music and style. Her trademark braces and dayglo clothes were a playful rejection of the status quo and of conformity and complacency. She dissected gender politics, consumer culture, and the obsessions of modern life in a way that made us all want sing along with her.

At the core of Poly’s work from Germ Free Adolescents through Generation Indigo, is a revolutionary with a genuine love for this world and the people and things in it. Her indomitable heart is all over the new material from her championing of cruelty free products and as she put it, "being conscious of the slaughterhouse culture" (“I Luv Ur Sneakers”) to giving voice to marginalized poor people worldwide (“No Rockefeller”) to tackling racism (“Colour Blind”). Poly Styrene never stopped exciting us with her incisive world-view, amazing wit, and her adventurous sound. It is impossible to imagine what modern music would be like without her incalculable contributions but it’s probably not worth imagining a world that never had Poly Styrene in it.

A thrilling work from a true pioneer and rebel in every sense, Poly Styrene’s album Generation Indigo is out today through Future Noise Music and was produced by Youth (The Verve, Killing Joke, The Fireman, Edwyn Collins).The album’s fusion of punk spirit, and fresh sounds has already received rave reviews on both sides of the Atlantic from Spin, NPR, NME, MOJO and countless others. The forward looking Generation Indigo showcases Poly’s humorous musings on pop culture, the internet and fashion whilst also tackling heavier subject matter (war and racism) with her politically aware and intelligent lyrics all in the inimitable voice of a genuine icon. Listen to the full Generation Indigo record streaming on AOL Spinner.

Marianne Faithful to Release Horses and High Heels

Marianne Faithful will release her 23rd album, Horse and High Heels, in the US  on June 28th via Naïve Records.  The collection of songs consists of four originals and eight covers ranging from Carol King’s “Going Back” to Greg Dulli & Mark Lanegan’s “The Stations.”  Four of the tracks feature virtuosic guitarist John Porter (Eric Clapton, The Smiths) while Lou Reed and Dr. John/MC5’s Wayne Kramer each make cameos on multiple songs.

Iconic, influential, and inimitable, Marianne has been an entrancing and creative musical presence for the past 47 years.  Beginning with her debut single, “As Tears Go By” (1964, the first song ever written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards), Marianne has created an enduring legacy with her distinct, emotive, and truly haunting voice.   She has also established herself as a powerful songwriter with a gift for crafting visceral melodies and deeply resonant lyrics.  Her artistic fearlessness has led her to sing with legends like David Bowie and Metallica, and collaborate with a younger generation of musicians she influenced such as Beck, Morrissey, Billy Corgan and Blur.

Horses and High Heels was recorded in New Orleans and features a core of masterful local musicians.  It was produced by Hal Willner (Laurie Anderson, Allen Ginsberg), who also helmed Marianne’s critically-acclaimed 2009 collection of covers and duets: Easy Come, Easy Go. The songs touch on everything from soul, blues, folk, country, jazz-pop perkiness, and beguiling guitar-rock.  Much like the rest of her career, the only consistent theme or style of the album is Marianne herself.  Click HERE to listen to the original new song, “Why Did We Have To Part?”

Juan-Carlos Formell @ Zinc Bar | NYC

Grammy-nominated Cuban guitarist/composer/vocalist Juan-Carlos Formell re-ignites the connections between Cuban music and jazz with his explosive new project "Johnny's Dream Club". Named for a legendary Havana jazz cabaret, "Johnny's Dream Club" represents a place outside time - the vortex between New Orleans and Havana, where the parallel lines of Cuban music and American jazz converge. It's a new dimension of latin jazz --intense, lyrical, dangerously dream-like. Formell and his all-star quartet map this territory in a delirious sequence of juxtapositions: "Ciudad" ("City"), evoking the nightmare of an urban apocalypse, flows into a  jazz ballad about an elusive love ("Siempre que te vas"); songs about being lost at sea ("Las islas son malvadas", "Cuando hable de la noche") and the bloody history of the Caribbean ("Yanbando") are set against haunting, mystical love songs ("Sotavento", "Fuego de Amor") inspired by Havana's "Feeling" movement.

A precursor to - and influence upon - bossa nova, Feeling emerged from the Bohemian enclaves of Centro Habana in the late 1940s. Feeling's free-style guitar, with progressive harmonies, diminished chords and bittersweet texts of disillusioned love reflected the sophisticated after-hours atmosphere of Havana's bohemian AfroCuban musicians: composer/guitarists Jose Antonio Mendez and Cesar Portillo de la Luz; singers Elena Burke and Omara Portuondo; pianists Bebo Valdes and Peruchin.

Feeling was also the starting point of Juan-Carlos Formell's biography. Born in Havana in 1964, a fourth generation Cuban musician, he learned the technique of the Feeling guitar from the creators of the genre: Mendez, Froilan, Guyun.  He began composing in his teens, and studied bass with Andres Escalona, the first bassist of the Havana Symphony Orchestra. After completing his studies Juan-Carlos became the bassist for the jazz pianist Emiliano Salvador.

As a classically trained bassist, virtuoso guitarist, and composer gifted with a groundbreaking and powerful writing style, Juan-Carlos had all the elements to become a voice of his generation - but instead, was prevented from performing or recording his own work by Cuba's government-controlled music industry because his music didn't fit into any official category. In 1993, after touring Mexico as a replacement for bassist Cachaito Lopez, Juan-Carlos fled to the United State to realize his mission of creating a new wave of Cuban music. He settled in New York City and soon started his own band. His years of struggle were vindicated when he was signed to a major record label in 1999 and his debut album, "Songs from a Little Blue House" was nominated for a Grammy. Part prophet, part poet, in exile Juan-Carlos has forged a post-modern identity for AfroCuban music that has been hailed as "musical magic realism". His five albums constitute an epic poem of Antillean mytho-history, with songs ranging from a paen to the flora and fauna of his native country, a personal invocation to an AfroCuban deity, an ode to a sacred river or a hymn to the "divine light" that brings us to a union with our higher selves. Juan-Carlos describes his new project as "a reflection of our culture today -- in the post-modern landscape, we are all refugees from the broken city, haunted, adrift at sea, in danger of losing our true reference points and losing our way forever. I keep returning to New Orleans for inspiration because I believe that there, at the crossroads of the Caribbean, it's possible to create music that embraces the past while gazing at the future -- a new music without genres and categories."

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Juan-Carlos Formell @ Zinc Bar | NYC  -- November 10th, 2010

ZINC BAR 82 West 3rd St (btw Sullivan & Thompson)
sets: 9:30 PM, 11:30 PM & 1:00 AM